Rod Smith, Ray Bush

Ohio politicians striking early in college union debate with state budget proposal


Student-athletes in the state of Ohio will not be allowed to be viewed as employees of their respective universities if some politicians in the state have their say about it. A proposal to the state’s budget review submitted Monday would prevent student-athletes from being considered employees if the proposal is passed. This is far from a certainty, but it is also a reminder that the influence from the recent ruling by the National Labor Relations Board in Chicago has opened eyes around the country, and not just those of football players and university officials.

“I think this is a statement of what we all thought is obvious, and that is athletes are not employees of their university,” said House Appropriations Committee Chairman Ron Amstutz, a Wooster Republican, according to

It will be interesting to see if this proposal passes in the state of Ohio. We knew the college players union conversation was going to develop (or devolve) in to a political game, and now it has taken that next step in becoming a political hot button issue. If Ohio passes this proposal, similar proposals in other states surely will not be far behind as the battle continues to rage.

Ohio is a good state to test these waters as well, considering the number of division one programs within the borders. In addition to Ohio State and Cincinnati, Ohio is home FBS programs at Akron, Bowling Green, Kent State, Miami, Ohio, and Toledo. And we have not even mentioned the FCS programs (Youngstown State) and other programs that play division one basketball (Dayton).

As a reminder, the ruling made by the NLRB currently only pertains to private institutions, but it opens the door for progress at public institutions if Northwestern football players succeed in forming the first recognized union of collegiate players.

Dismissed by ‘Cuse, Ashton Broyld lands at West Georgia

Ashton Broyld, Steele Divitto
Associated Press
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A little over two months after getting the boot from Syracuse, Ashton Broyld has found himself a new college football home.

Multiple outlets have picked up on the fact that Broyld is now playing for Div. II West Georgia.  Broyld left the Orange listed as a running back, but is playing wide receiver according to the team’s official roster.

There was already a familiar face in the locker room upon Broyld’s arrival as Wayne Williams is playing defensive tackle for the Wolves.  Williams announced in late June that he had decided to transfer out of Scott Shafer‘s ‘Cuse program.

I checked in on them,” Shafer said of his two former players Thursday. “I’m happy to see those guys are still playing football.”

In 2013, Broyld led the team in both receptions (52) and receiving yards (452). Broyld was the Orange’s leading receiver through the first three games last season before a lower-leg injury caused him to miss eight of the last nine games.

In late July, Broyld was dismissed for violating unspecified team rules.

Vols ‘very confident there was no inappropriate conduct’ between Butch Jones, player

KNOXVILLE, TN - OCTOBER 11:  Head coach Butch Jones of the Tennessee Volunteers watches the action during a game against the Chattanooga Mocs at Neyland Stadium on October 11, 2014 in Knoxville, Tennessee.  (Photo by Stacy Revere/Getty Images)
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In the midst of reports that he had a physical altercation with one of his Tennessee players during summer camp this year, Butch Jones labeled the speculation “absolutely ridiculous.”

Apparently, his bosses agree with the head coach.

At a board meeting Thursday, UT-Knoxville chancellor Jimmy Cheek stated that he and athletic director Dave Hart had done their “due diligence” in investigating the accusations that Jones and senior offensive lineman Mack Crowder were involved in some type of physical skirmish during practice this past August.  The end result of interviews with Jones, coaches and players was the conclusion that there was nothing to the reports and message-board rumors.

“There’s been a lot of rumor and misinformation on social media and message boards about an alleged incident during football practice,” Cheek said according to‘s Wes Rucker. “It’s not our practice to respond to rumors, but I thought it was important to let you know that we’ve done our due diligence and Dave Hart and I are very confident there was no inappropriate conduct with any players or coaches.”

Shortly after Cheek spoke at the board meeting, Crowder took to Twitter with a series of missives that speaks around the issue.