Bobby Hauck

UNLV banned from 2014 postseason after appeal is shot down

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The worst fears of the UNLV football, rising a mini-wave of momentum from 2013, have been realized.

Late last month it was reported that, because of low scores on the NCAA’s Academic Progress Report (APR), UNLV was facing the loss of scholarships or even a bowl ban.  While the school stated at the time that it was “engaged in the APR process ahead of the June release,” that proved to be a fruitless endeavor as UNLV announced Thursday that its appeal to the NCAA on its bowl ban has been denied.

As a result, and because it failed to reach the minimum APR score, the Rebels football program will be banned from participating in the 2014 postseason. That ban would include the Mountain West Conference championship game should the Rebels qualify.

Last season was the first time the Rebels had participated in a bowl game since 2000.

“I am disappointed for the vast majority of our football players who understand the importance of academics and who embrace and meet their responsibilities,” athletic director Tina Kunzer-Murphy said in a statement. “In fact, 96 percent of the football players on our current roster have never cost UNLV an APR point – so clearly, the overwhelming majority of our student-athletes understand that their first priority must be academics.”

“I am also extremely encouraged and optimistic due to the response I have seen since I started here from our student-athletes, our coaches, our athletic department personnel and our University leadership. In particular, I want to thank our President, Don Snyder, and our Provost, John White, for all of their support in addressing this problem. Everyone associated with UNLV Football recognizes what the expectations are in terms of academic performance and everyone involved has shown a genuine commitment to getting these numbers where they need to be. We are taking a number of significant steps to improve the level of academic support.”

While scholarship losses were not a part of the punishment, further punitive measures will include “[r]eplacing four hours of weekly practice time with four additional hours of academic activities” as well as “[f]ive days of football-related activities per week instead of six.”

In the NCAA system for measuring academic progress, a school’s sports programs must each maintain at least a .930 APR (out of a possible 1.000) over a four-year period in order to maintain eligibility for postseason play in their respective sports.  A two-year score of .940 or above would also allow a program to be eligible for postseason competition.

According to a report from the Las Vegas Sun last month, UNLV’s four-year football APR was .932 last June, just above the threshold that could trigger a bowl ban or scholarship losses.  The football program has already dealt with the latter as the Rebels were docked a total of four scholarships in 2006 and 2007 because of low APR marks.

The APR, the NCAA’s handbook states, is designed to track student-athletes who receive athletics financial aid, with the report based on two factors: eligibility/progress toward graduation and retention. For those wondering how the system works and scores are accumulated, please allow The Association to explain:

During each regular academic term (a semester) of full-time enrollment, a student-athlete can earn a two points towards his/her team’s APR score. Each of the two factors (eligibility and retention) is worth 1 point. A student-athlete will receive 1 point if, at the end of the semester, he/she is academically eligible to compete in the following regular academic term or has graduated. Additionally, a student-athlete can earn 1 point if he/she returns to the institution (retained) as a full-time student in the next regular academic term or graduates. The same point system is applied every semester thereafter. So potentially, in one academic year (fall semester and spring semester) a student-athlete can receive 4 total points.

At the end of each academic year, the score of each student-athlete is added with the scores of his/her teammates. That number is divided by the total number of points that team could have earned. That number is then multiplied by 1,000, giving an individual sport its APR score.

The UNLV football team is still being hurt, the Sun points out, by an .891 APR for the 2011-12 academic year.

Leading returning tackler among three dismissed by Texas Tech

ARLINGTON, TX - OCTOBER 03:  Shock Linwood #32 of the Baylor Bears runs the ball against Dakota Allen #40 of the Texas Tech Red Raiders in the first quarter at AT&T Stadium on October 3, 2015 in Arlington, Texas.  (Photo by Ronald Martinez/Getty Images)
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Not long after wrapping up spring practice, Texas Tech’s defense has a significant body blow.

In a press release, Tech announced that three football players, sophomore offensive lineman Robert Castaneda, redshirt freshman offensive lineman Trace Ellison and sophomore linebacker Dakota Allen, have been dismissed from the football program by head coach Kliff Kingsbury.  The dismissals are “due to a failure to uphold student-athlete expectations.”

The most noteworthy — and damaging — of the trio of dismissals is Allen.

Last season, Allen was the Red Raiders’ second-leading tackler with 87.  With Micah Awe (126 tackles) departed, Allen would’ve been Tech’s leading returning tackler.

Allen, who had six tackles for loss and two interceptions for good measure, started five of the 12 games in which he played last season.

Castaneda played in 13 games last season as a reserve lineman, while Ellison took a redshirt as a true freshman.

A&M assistant throws hissy fit after five-star QB decommits

LONDON - DECEMBER 09:  In this photo illustration a baby suckles a dummy whilst resting in her cot on December 09, 2005 in London, England. A recent US study has shown that cot deaths can be reduced by 90 percent if a baby sleeps with a dummy.  (Photo illustration by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
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Somebody needs a nap.  Or his binky.  Or both.

Quite the imbroglio was kicked up on the recruiting trail late Wednesday night when five-star 2017 quarterback Tate Martell announced that he had decided to decommit from Texas A&M and reopen his recruitment.  Martell, who had once committed to Washington as an eighth grader, made the decision after a recent trip to Ohio State, although he has yet to commit to the Buckeyes or anyone else for that matter.

While big news for A&M and its next recruiting class, Martell’s decommitment likely would’ve been given its 15 minutes of fame and then everyone would’ve moved on… and then Aaron Moorehead happened.

Moorehead is A&M’s wide receivers coach who apparently didn’t appreciate Martell’s “disloyalty” as, six minutes after the quarterback posted his tweet, the assistant threw a Twitter hissy fit.

“Scared for this next group of kids. There is no accountability and no sense of positivity when it comes to adversity. #selfish #allaboutme,” the coach wrote in a tweet that has since been deleted. Moorehead then attempted to cram the toothpaste back into the tube, but stepped even further into it with a subsequent tweet.

“People talk about leadership and this generation flip flops like its nothing. That’s a real issue. My dad would have whipped my ass,” another deleted tweet read.

Loyalty and flip-flop talk from a coach who abruptly left Virginia Tech for the same job at A&M? That’s rich.

They say you reap what you sow, though, and…

That would be Mannie Netherly, a four-star wide receiver who had been committed to the Aggies, with the key word there being “had” as the Texas high school recruit decommitted as well. But wait, there’s more.

“I would like to say thank you to TAMU & fans but due to some tweets subtweeted towards my brother, I will no longer be looking at A&M,” Tyjon Lindsey wrote in a tweet that, yes, has since been deleted. Lindsey is a five-star receiver who had been considering A&M, with the key word there being “had.”  Again.

Reaping and sowing, y’all.  Reaping and sowing.

UPDATED 11:31 p.m. ET: Right around the time I was hitting “publish” on this post, Moorehead posted an apology on his Twitter account.

Last night, I made some impromptu comments on social media out of frustration and out of a true love for Texas A&M Football.  I want to apologize to all of the young men in high school who work so hard to achieve their dreams of playing college football & I wish them all well wherever they end up.  I would also like to apologize to Coach Sumlin and the Aggie Family for not representing our university the right way.  I need to do better & I will.

Former K-State S Kaleb Prewett appears headed to Mizzou

MANHATTAN, KS - NOVEMBER 05:  Wide receiver Jay Lee #4 of the Baylor Bears catches a pass as defensive back Kaleb Prewett #4 of the Kansas State Wildcats defends during the game at Bill Snyder Family Football Stadium on November 5, 2015 in Manhattan, Kansas.  (Photo by Jamie Squire/Getty Images)
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In early February, Bill Snyder confirmed that Kaleb Prewett was no longer a member of the Kansas State football team.  Fastforward three months, and it appears the former Big 12 defensive back has found himself a new home at a former former Big 12 school.

While the school has yet to announce it, Prewett’s Twitter profile now indicates that he is a member of the Missouri Tigers. “Former Kansas State safety. Current Mizzou safety,” the bio now reads.

A couple of tweets from the former Missouri high school player seemed to hint at the development as well.

Prewett started eight of the first nine games at free safety, with the only game he missed being due to a concussion. He lost his job for the final three games, however, and then was kept away from K-State’s bowl game because of an alcohol-related arrest.

Prewett, a three-star 2014 recruit, played in six games as a true freshman.

Barring the unforeseen, Prewett will be forced to sit out the 2016 season to satisfy NCAA transfer rules. The defensive back would then have two years of eligibility remaining beginning in 2017.

Little-used Vols TE Neiko Creamer to transfer, look elsewhere for playing time

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Failing to make much of a dent during his first two-plus years in Knoxville, Neiko Creamer has decided to ply his football wares elsewhere.

Wednesday evening, UT head coach Butch Jones confirmed that Creamer has decided to leave the Volunteers football program and will transfer out.  According to Jones, he and his staff will help the tight end find the right fit at a new home.

No reason was given for Creamer’s decision to look elsewhere, although the opportunity for more playing time would be a good place to start.

A three-star member of UT’s 2014 recruiting class, Creamer, whose father, Andre, played for the Vols in the eighties, was rated as the No. 18 player at any position in the state of Maryland.  After redshirting as a true freshman, and working as both a linebacker and tight end, Creamer played in one game during the 2015 season.