Auburn OC steps in it by tossing “what if…” card at FSU loss


With nothing but a couple of spring games — we see you Oregon, Oregon State, Miami (OH) out there straggling — standing between us and a football-less abyss the next three months, one of Gus Malzahn‘s coordinators has added a little sizzle to what’s soon to be a lack of substance.

For those who have forgotten already, Auburn had jumped out to a 21-3 lead on favored Florida State late in the second quarter of the BCS title game this past January.  However, five straight non-scoring possessions — four punts followed by an interception — allowed the Seminoles to close the gap to 21-13 heading into the fourth quarter, with that closing stanza finding FSU closing out a 34-31 win with a trio of touchdowns.

It was that drought after halftime that had AU offensive coordinator Rhett Lashlee lamenting what could’ve been — and what will likely leave people buzzing over the coordinator playing that particular card.

From Brandon Marcello of

“We could’ve executed much better and really named our score in that game, and we didn’t,” Lashlee said. “We let them hang around and we ended up losing the football game. …

“From an offensive standpoint, if we would’ve executed at a higher level, there were plays here or there that maybe even the average fan doesn’t see that, if we just executed, we stay on the field on third down, or it’s not a bust and a sack or a throw-away, it’s a touchdown. That could have blown the thing open.”

Just a couple of things.

One, the Seminoles could, if they so desired, rue similar missed opportunities early on that allowed the Tigers to jump out to that double-digit lead to begin with. In between a field goal on its opening drive and a Devonta Freeman three-yard touchdown run with five minutes left in the first half, the ‘Noles ran 14 plays and netted just 28 yards on four straight possessions. I’m quite certain that the FSU coaching staff could focus on just executing to “stay on the field on third down” or not busting a protection that results in a sack or a throwaway or any other lament instead of, ya know, giving credit to the defense — especially a defense as talented and dominant as FSU’s was a year ago.

Secondly, does an assistant whose squad was perilously close to 9-3 or 8-4 or worse in the regular season — “Kick-Six” or “War Damn Miracle!” ring a bell? Wins over Ole Miss, Mississippi State and Texas A&M by a combined 16 points, the latter two after trailing in the fourth quarter? — really want to toss about the “what if…” card so flippantly, when all signs point to that squad being a bounce or two away from watching the Seminoles from home instead of the sidelines?

I’d think not but, hey, at least we have a little fodder heading into the really dark recesses of the college football offseason.

NCAA grants South Alabama TE Andrew Reinkemeyer a sixth season

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South Alabama recently received some positive news on the personnel front.

A USA spokesperson (for the university, not the country) confirmed to that Andrew Reinkemeyer has been granted a sixth season of eligibility by the NCAA. The tight end will use that additional season of eligibility, his last, to play for the Jaguars in 2018.

The decision to grant Reinkemeyer an extra season of eligibility was seemingly a no-brainer.

As a true sophomore at a Kansas junior college, Reinkemeyer suffered an injury in the 2015 season opener and didn’t play again that year. After transferring to USA, Reinkemeyer missed the entire 2016 season because of the torn Achilles tendon that cost him most of the previous season at the JUCO.

Finally healthy last season, Reinkemeyer caught 10 passes for 75 yards for the Sun Belt Conference program. He was the leading receiver amongst Jaguars tight ends in 2017.

North Carolina formally announces hiring of ex-Tennessee RBs coach Robert Gillespie

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The latest addition to Larry Fedora‘s North Carolina coaching staff has been confirmed.

Following up on reports that surfaced earlier this month. UNC announced Wednesday that Fedora has hired Robert Gillespie. While not confirmed by the football program in the release, it’s expected Gillespie will serve as the Tar Heels running backs coach, a position he’s held for most of his coaching career.

“We are excited to welcome Robert and his family to Chapel Hill,” Fedora said in a statement. “He has a well-earned reputation as a great offensive coach and recruiter, and he has a wealth of experience working with running backs at a very high level. We are happy to have him join our staff as we get into the bulk of spring practice.”

Gillespie fills the hole created by the departure of Gunter Brewer, who left as the Tar Heels’ wide receivers coach for a job with the Philadelphia Eagles earlier this month. It’s expected that Luke Paschall, currently the running backs coach, will assume Brewer’s role with receivers.

Gillespie, a former Florida running back, spent the past five seasons as the running backs coach at Tennessee. He was originally retained by new UT head coach Jeremy Pruitt before parting ways with the football program shortly after National Signing Day.

In addition to UT, Gillespie has spent time on coaching staffs at South Carolina (2006-08), Oklahoma State (2009-10) and West Virginia (2011-12). He was the running backs coach at each of those stops.

Report: Alabama QB Tua Tagovailoa’s thumb injury ‘just a sprain’

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It appears Alabama can breathe a sigh of relief on the injury front.

Tuesday, after the reigning national champions had put the finishing touches on its first practice of the spring, Nick Saban confirmed that quarterback Tua Tagovailoa had suffered an unspecified injury to the thumb on his LEFT (throwing) hand.  It was expected that the quarterback would travel to Birmingham for further evaluation of the injury.

While there’s been nothing official yet from the football program or head coach,, citing unnamed sources, writes that the injury “is believed to just be a sprain and he should be able to return to practice in at least a limited capacity at some point soon.”

Until then, Jalen Hurts will take the majority of the reps as the Crimson Tide continues its march through their 15 spring practice sessions.

The rising true junior Hurts, who has started every game but one the past two seasons, and the rising true sophomore Tagovailoa, the national championship game hero who replaced Hurts at halftime of the overtime win, are engaged in a competition for the starting job that, barring a post-spring transfer, is expected to extend into summer camp.  That said, most observers outside of the UA football program fully expect Tagovailoa, because of his proficiency in the passing game relative to Hurts, to earn the job at some point before the Tide opens the defense of their title against Louisville in Orlando Sept. 1.

John Calipari takes page out of Nick Saban’s playbook by warning of (rat) poison

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One’s a dot, two’s a line and three’s a trend as the old adage go and it appears rat poison for college players is now a burgeoning trend.

Speaking to reporters on Wednesday ahead of Kentucky’s NCAA tournament game against Kansas State, Wildcats coach John Calipari took a page straight out of Nick Saban and Lane Kiffin’s playbook by warning his team of drinking the media “poison” the past few days.

“My challenge is making sure these kids don’t drink that poison. That poison being we have an easy road. There are no easy roads in this tournament,” said Calipari. “If they drink that poison, we’ll be done Thursday. If they don’t drink the poison, it’ll be a dog fight Thursday — let’s see what happens. Sometimes you wonder why they’re (the media) trying to paint that picture with my team — probably because they’re young and they know they don’t know better.”

Ok then.

At least the term Calipari is using isn’t out of thin air given that Saban infamously ranted on his team buying into the media’s discussion of being a good team as “rat poison” last season. For the record though, the rant by the basketball coach was prompted by a question that didn’t at all involve Kentucky having an easy path to the Final Four but was rather about team and individual goals.

It’s not often you think of Saban as a trendsetter but it seems he was certainly ahead of the curve when it came to labeling media talk as poison.