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SEC announces scheduling rotation for next dozen years

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With the SEC deciding earlier this month to remain at an eight-game conference schedule, the league has gotten around to detailing its future schedule rotation starting this season and going through the 2025 season.

Every season, SEC teams will play six games against divisional foes, one permanent annual rival and one non-division crossover game.  The permanent opponents, as previously reported, are as follows:

— Alabama-Tennessee
— Auburn-Georgia
— Arkansas Missouri
— Florida-LSU
— Kentucky-Mississippi State
— Ole Miss-Vanderbilt
— South Carolina-Texas A&M

Announced today, the following are the rotating opponents for SEC schools from 2014-25 (“vs.” indicates a home game and “at” indicates an away game):

ALABAMA – 2014 vs. Florida; 2015 at Georgia; 2016 vs. Kentucky; 2017 at Vanderbilt; 2018 vs. Missouri; 2019 at South Carolina; 2020 vs. Georgia; 2021 at Florida; 2022 vs. Vanderbilt; 2023 at Kentucky; 2024 vs. South Carolina; 2025 at Missouri.
(Permanent opponents in 2014: Home – Auburn, Mississippi State, Texas A&M; Away – Arkansas, LSU, Ole Miss, Tennessee. Sites alternate home and away through 2025.)

ARKANSAS – 2014 vs. Georgia; 2015 at Tennessee; 2016 vs. Florida; 2017 at South Carolina; 2018 vs. Vanderbilt; 2019 at Kentucky; 2020 vs. Tennessee; 2021 at Georgia; 2022 vs. South Carolina; 2023 at Florida; 2024 vs. Kentucky, 2025 at Vanderbilt.
(Permanent opponents in 2014: Home – Alabama, LSU, Ole Miss; Away – Auburn, Mississippi State, Texas A&M, Missouri. Sites alternate home and away through 2025.)

AUBURN – 2014 vs. South Carolina; 2015 at Kentucky; 2016 vs. Vanderbilt; 2017 at Missouri; 2018 vs. Tennessee; 2019 at Florida; 2020 vs. Kentucky; 2021 at South Carolina; 2022 vs. Missouri; 2023 at Vanderbilt; 2024 vs. Florida; 2025 at Tennessee.
(Permanent opponents in 2014: Home – Arkansas, LSU, Texas A&M; Away – Alabama, Ole Miss, Mississippi State, Georgia. Sites alternate home and away through 2025.)

FLORIDA – 2014 at Alabama; 2015 vs. Ole Miss; 2016 at Arkansas; 2017 vs. Texas A&M; 2018 at Mississippi State; 2019 vs. Auburn; 2020 at Ole Miss; 2021 vs. Alabama; 2022 at Texas A&M; 2023 vs. Arkansas; 2024 at Auburn; 2025 vs. Mississippi State.
(Permanent opponents in 2014: Home – Kentucky, Missouri, South Carolina, LSU; Away – Georgia, Tennessee, Vanderbilt. Sites alternate home and away through 2025.)

GEORGIA – 2014 at Arkansas; 2015 vs. Alabama; 2016 at Ole Miss; 2017 vs. Mississippi State; 2018 at LSU; 2019 vs. Texas A&M; 2020 at Alabama; 2021 vs. Arkansas; 2022 at Mississippi State; 2023 vs. Ole Miss; 2024 at Texas A&M; 2025 vs. LSU.
(Permanent opponents in 2014: Home – Florida, Tennessee, Vanderbilt, Auburn; Away – Kentucky, Missouri, South Carolina. Sites alternate home and away through 2025.)

KENTUCKY – 2014 at LSU; 2015 vs. Auburn; 2016 at Alabama; 2017 vs. Ole Miss; 2018 at Texas A&M; 2019 vs. Arkansas; 2020 at Auburn; 2021 vs. LSU; 2022 at Ole Miss; 2023 vs. Alabama; 2024 at Arkansas; 2025 vs. Texas A&M.
(Permanent opponents in 2014: Home – Georgia, South Carolina, Vanderbilt, Mississippi State; Away – Florida, Missouri, Tennessee. Sites alternate home and away through 2025.)

LSU – 2014 vs. Kentucky; 2015 at South Carolina; 2016 vs. Missouri; 2017 at Tennessee; 2018 vs. Georgia; 2019 at Vanderbilt; 2020 vs. South Carolina; 2021 at Kentucky; 2022 vs. Tennessee; 2023 at Missouri; 2024 vs. Vanderbilt; 2025 at Georgia.
(Permanent opponents in 2014: Home – Alabama, Ole Miss, Mississippi State; Away – Arkansas, Auburn, Texas A&M, Florida. Sites alternate home and away through 2025.)

OLE MISS – 2014 vs. Tennessee; 2015 at Florida; 2016 vs. Georgia; 2017 at Kentucky; 2018 vs. South Carolina; 2019 at Missouri; 2020 vs. Florida; 2021 at Tennessee; 2022 vs. Kentucky; 2023 at Georgia; 2024 vs. Missouri; 2025 at South Carolina.
(Permanent opponents in 2014: Home – Alabama, Auburn, Mississippi State; Away – Arkansas, LSU, Texas A&M, Vanderbilt. Sites alternate home and away through 2025.)

MISSISSIPPI STATE – 2014 vs. Vanderbilt; 2015 at Missouri; 2016 vs. South Carolina; 2017 at Georgia; 2018 vs. Florida; 2019 at Tennessee; 2020 vs. Missouri; 2021 at Vanderbilt; 2022 vs. Georgia; 2023 at South Carolina; 2024 vs. Tennessee; 2025 at Florida.
(Permanent opponents in 2014: Home – Arkansas, Auburn, Texas A&M; Away – Alabama, LSU, Ole Miss, Kentucky. Sites alternate home and away through 2025.)

MISSOURI – 2014 at Texas A&M; 2015 vs. Mississippi State; 2016 at LSU; 2017 vs. Auburn; 2018 at Alabama; 2019 vs. Ole Miss; 2020 at Mississippi State; 2021 vs. Texas A&M; 2022 at Auburn; 2023 vs. LSU; 2024 at Ole Miss; 2025 vs. Alabama.
(Permanent opponents in 2014: Home – Georgia, Kentucky, Vanderbilt, Arkansas; Away – Florida, South Carolina, Tennessee. Sites alternate home and away through 2025.)

SOUTH CAROLINA – 2014 at Auburn; 2015 vs. LSU; 2016 at Mississippi State; 2017 vs. Arkansas; 2018 at Ole Miss; 2019 vs. Alabama; 2020 at LSU; 2021 vs. Auburn; 2022 at Arkansas; 2023 vs. Mississippi State; 2024 at Alabama; 2025 vs. Ole Miss.
(Permanent opponents in 2014: Home – Georgia, Missouri, Tennessee, Texas A&M; Away – Florida, Kentucky, Vanderbilt. Sites alternate home and away through 2025.)

TEXAS A&M – 2014 vs. Missouri; 2015 at Vanderbilt; 2016 vs. Tennessee; 2017 at Florida; 2018 vs. Kentucky; 2019 at Georgia; 2020 vs. Vanderbilt; 2021 at Missouri; 2022 vs. Florida; 2023 at Tennessee; 2024 vs. Georgia; 2025 at Kentucky.
(Permanent opponents in 2014: Home – Arkansas, LSU, Ole Miss; Away – Alabama, Auburn, Mississippi State, South Carolina. Sites alternate home and away through 2025.)

TENNESSEE – 2014 at Ole Miss; 2015 vs. Arkansas; 2016 at Texas A&M; 2017 vs. LSU; 2018 at Auburn; 2019 vs. Mississippi State; 2020 at Arkansas; 2021 vs. Ole Miss; 2022 at LSU; 2023 vs. Texas A&M; 2024 at Mississippi State; 2025 vs. Auburn.
(Permanent opponents in 2014: Home – Florida, Kentucky, Missouri, Alabama; Away – Georgia, South Carolina, Vanderbilt. Sites alternate home and away through 2025.)

VANDERBILT – 2014 at Mississippi State; 2015 vs. Texas A&M; 2016 at Auburn; 2017 vs. Alabama; 2018 at Arkansas; 2019 vs. LSU; 2020 at Texas A&M; 2021 vs. Mississippi State; 2022 at Alabama; 2023 vs. Auburn; 2024 at LSU; 2025 vs. Arkansas.

Just a couple of notes:

  • Tennessee will play LSU in Baton Rouge in 2022, 12 years after the Vols last trip to Death Valley.
  • When the 2019 Auburn-Florida game is played, it will have been eight years since the last matchup between the two storied football programs.  The next AU game against another longtime rival, Tennessee, won’t be until 2018.
  • Alabama last played Florida in Gainesville in 2011.  The Tide won’t do so again until 2022.  UA will go nine regular seasons  between matchups with South Carolina, the next one not coming until 2019.
  • Missouri will face Mississippi State for the first time as conference foes in 2020, eight years after the Tigers joined the SEC.
  • Texas A&M will face Georgia for the first time as conference foes in 2019, seven years after the Aggies joined the SEC.

Reports say Rutgers to face Maryland at Yankee Stadium in 2017

NEW YORK, NY - MAY 23:  General view as CC Sabathia #52 of the New York Yankees delivers a pitch to Adam Rosales #9 of the Texas Rangers in the second inning on May 23, 2015 at Yankee Stadium in the Bronx borough of New York City.  (Photo by Elsa/Getty Images)
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The goal of adding Rutgers to the Big Ten was to extend the conference’s brand into New York. So it would be nice to have the Big Ten’s “New York team” actually play in New York every so often.

On that front, Rutgers has lined up a game with Maryland at Yankee Stadium on Nov. 4, 2017, according to multiple reports.

Dan Duggan of NJ.com reported former Knights AD Julie Hermann originally agreed to move a game to the House That Jeter Built for the 2017 season.

“There were discussions by the previous administration with the Yankees and an agreement in principle was reached,” Rutgers AD Pat Hobbs told the site on Friday. “I’m reviewing those terms and we’ll announce our intention in due course.”

Rutgers brass appeared at a Yankees game on Tuesday to promote the budding relationship between the two entities.

“(The Yankees) want to work more closely with us,” Hobbs told NJ.com Tuesday. “We want to look at maybe bringing a game here and announcing that sometime down the road. I guess the Yankees see Rutgers is starting to move forward and is a good story so they want to be part of it, too.”

Scarlet Knights head coach Chris Ash threw out the first pitch before the pinstripers’ game earlier this week.

“They kind of explained the configuration of the stadium for a football game and it looked like it would be a really neat set-up,” Ash said. “It looks like from the suite anyway, if you were in cold weather in the fall or in December, that would be a pretty good place to watch a game.”

Yankee Stadium hosted a Notre Dame-Army game in 2010, and the New Era Pinstripe Bowl (with which the Big Ten is affiliated) has been a post-Christmas bowl week staple since that same season.

Hobbs said a game at Yankee Stadium will help toward the Rutgers-Yankees relationship he’s been hoping to build, which makes perfect sense when you’re Rutgers and they’re the Yankees.

“There are a tremendous amount of Rutgers alums who work here in the city, so it’s really important,” Hobbs said. “It’s important for our relationship if we can be with an iconic organization like the Yankees. They have a lot of the history that we would like to start building at Rutgers.”

Ole Miss to suspend assistants, reduce scholarships in response to NCAA Notice of Allegations

BATON ROUGE, LA - OCTOBER 25:  Head coach Hugh Freeze of the Mississippi Rebels reacts to a call during the game against the LSU Tigers at Tiger Stadium on October 25, 2014 in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.  (Photo by Chris Graythen/Getty Images)
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A day after Baylor fired Art Briles and a day before Memorial Day weekend, Ole Miss has released its long-awaited response to the NCAA’s Notice of Allegations.

The 52-page document details the breadth and nature of violations committed by the Rebels’ football program. A sizable chunk of the 13 violations pertaining to football occurred under the four-year watch of current head coach Hugh Freeze.

Current assistant coaches Chris Kiffin (defensive line), Derrick Nix (running backs), Maurice Harris (tight ends) and Matt Luke (offensive line) were named in the report. Most of the violations come in the forms of paid cell phone bills, comped hotel stays, paid ACT prep courses and free loaner vehicles.

Many of the violations are downright silly.

The most serious allegation comes from the Houston Nutt era, when assistant coach Chris Vaughn and operations assistant David Saunders arranged for three future Rebels to commit ACT fraud. Vaughn was fired from his assistant coaching job at Texas due to his involvement in this case.

Ole Miss requested to exclude the Laremy Tunsil NFL Draft night fiasco from this summer’s report since those allegations are still being investigated, and the NCAA granted that request.

Ole Miss has released this graphic detailing the scope and timeline of the case. The Rebels submitted its NOA response on April 21, and the NCAA has 60 days to submit its rebuttal. The two parties will then appear before the Committee on Infractions, who will then have around six weeks to release their verdict. A rough timeline would have the case wrapped up in full by October.

Ole Miss graphic

Ole Miss has also self-imposed the following penalties, plus a fine of nearly $160,000:

Those sanctions are just a baseline punishment. The NCAA can — and likely will — argue to increase them during the Committee on Infractions hearing later this year.

Ole Miss has suspended two unnamed assistants from recruiting.

Art Briles’ daughter calls firing ‘outrageous’ and ‘disgusting’ in Facebook post

WACO, TX - SEPTEMBER 06:  Head coach Art Briles of the Baylor Bears during play against the Northwestern State Demons at McLane Stadium on September 6, 2014 in Waco, Texas.  (Photo by Ronald Martinez/Getty Images)
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In times like these, you can’t expect the family members of coaches fired at the end of a whirlwind scandal to remain impartial. But you can hope they at least stay off social media.

Alas, Staley Lebby could not do that. Lebby is doubly affected by today’s news that Baylor has fired head coach Art Briles as Briles’ daughter and wife of the Bears’ running backs coach Jeff Lebby.

In a Facebook diatribe, Lebby called the firing “outrageous” and “the most disgusting thing I’ve ever seen.”

She writes:

I just stop crying long enough to be able to write this but this is all I will say on this outrageous situation – anyone who knows my dad knows he is a man of incredible character & Faith. He is one of the most giving & unselfish people I’ve ever been around.

He has been through so much in his life and has always been a fighter – he’s done everything the right way & for the right reasons. He has always wanted to take over programs that were suffering, like he once did, to take them to the top, which he has done at multiple places.

He wanted to be successful for his parents and make them proud. He has worked his ass off in his 40 years of coaching to get where he is today. He has NEVER been fired, his character has NEVER been questioned and he has NEVER been going to do anything unethically. 

He has always been a players coach & wanted nothing but the best for every single one of them.  He has only kept coaching as long as he has to build a sturdy foundation for his kids & grandkids.  

I guess a man that has resurrected your program and made you a top 10 program wasn’t worth fighting for or defending. The easy way out was taken. He will get to tell his side of the story to gain his name back –  the truth will be told and he will keep fighting the good fight. We aren’t backing down & throwing in the towel. When times are tough the tough will survive. Thanks for all the messages and texts and support – means a lot to us all. 

I will never wear a Baylor tshirt.

Georgia raises ticket prices following Kirby Smart hire

ATHENS, GA - SEPTEMBER 28: A general view of the Sanford Stadium before the game between the Georgia Bulldogs and the LSU Tigers on September 28, 2013 in Athens, Georgia. (Photo by Scott Cunningham/Getty Images)
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Running a college athletics department is only getting more expensive, so attending a college football game will only get more expensive. Or, at least attending a Georgia game will.

Bulldogs president Jere Morehead and athletics director Greg McGarity revealed Thursday per-seat donations would rise an average of 17 percent for priority season ticket holders beginning in the 2017 season.

“It’s in anticipation of things that are ahead,” McGarity told the Athens Banner-Herald.

Cost-of-attendance scholarships bumped that line item up $766,000, and other costs across the department added an additional $5.3 million to the budget. All this while Georgia is building a new indoor facility and replacing Mark Richt and his staff while hiring Kirby Smart and his new staff.

“Those projects are going to be expensive,” Morehead said. “The cost of operating our athletic program each year continues to rise particularly as you look at the enhancements that are being provided to our student-athletes and to the support that we’re providing our student-athletes.”

The bump in prices will raise an extra $2.5 million for Georgia, and represents the first time Bulldogs fans have been asked to ante up since 2005.

“We wanted to be respectable in the increase to not price people out of a certain area but we did feel like we needed to make an adjustment,” said McGarity. “We want to continue to encourage people to come to games. We’ve got our work cut out to make sure (that happens).”