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SEC announces scheduling rotation for next dozen years

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With the SEC deciding earlier this month to remain at an eight-game conference schedule, the league has gotten around to detailing its future schedule rotation starting this season and going through the 2025 season.

Every season, SEC teams will play six games against divisional foes, one permanent annual rival and one non-division crossover game.  The permanent opponents, as previously reported, are as follows:

— Alabama-Tennessee
— Auburn-Georgia
— Arkansas Missouri
— Florida-LSU
— Kentucky-Mississippi State
— Ole Miss-Vanderbilt
— South Carolina-Texas A&M

Announced today, the following are the rotating opponents for SEC schools from 2014-25 (“vs.” indicates a home game and “at” indicates an away game):

ALABAMA – 2014 vs. Florida; 2015 at Georgia; 2016 vs. Kentucky; 2017 at Vanderbilt; 2018 vs. Missouri; 2019 at South Carolina; 2020 vs. Georgia; 2021 at Florida; 2022 vs. Vanderbilt; 2023 at Kentucky; 2024 vs. South Carolina; 2025 at Missouri.
(Permanent opponents in 2014: Home – Auburn, Mississippi State, Texas A&M; Away – Arkansas, LSU, Ole Miss, Tennessee. Sites alternate home and away through 2025.)

ARKANSAS – 2014 vs. Georgia; 2015 at Tennessee; 2016 vs. Florida; 2017 at South Carolina; 2018 vs. Vanderbilt; 2019 at Kentucky; 2020 vs. Tennessee; 2021 at Georgia; 2022 vs. South Carolina; 2023 at Florida; 2024 vs. Kentucky, 2025 at Vanderbilt.
(Permanent opponents in 2014: Home – Alabama, LSU, Ole Miss; Away – Auburn, Mississippi State, Texas A&M, Missouri. Sites alternate home and away through 2025.)

AUBURN – 2014 vs. South Carolina; 2015 at Kentucky; 2016 vs. Vanderbilt; 2017 at Missouri; 2018 vs. Tennessee; 2019 at Florida; 2020 vs. Kentucky; 2021 at South Carolina; 2022 vs. Missouri; 2023 at Vanderbilt; 2024 vs. Florida; 2025 at Tennessee.
(Permanent opponents in 2014: Home – Arkansas, LSU, Texas A&M; Away – Alabama, Ole Miss, Mississippi State, Georgia. Sites alternate home and away through 2025.)

FLORIDA – 2014 at Alabama; 2015 vs. Ole Miss; 2016 at Arkansas; 2017 vs. Texas A&M; 2018 at Mississippi State; 2019 vs. Auburn; 2020 at Ole Miss; 2021 vs. Alabama; 2022 at Texas A&M; 2023 vs. Arkansas; 2024 at Auburn; 2025 vs. Mississippi State.
(Permanent opponents in 2014: Home – Kentucky, Missouri, South Carolina, LSU; Away – Georgia, Tennessee, Vanderbilt. Sites alternate home and away through 2025.)

GEORGIA – 2014 at Arkansas; 2015 vs. Alabama; 2016 at Ole Miss; 2017 vs. Mississippi State; 2018 at LSU; 2019 vs. Texas A&M; 2020 at Alabama; 2021 vs. Arkansas; 2022 at Mississippi State; 2023 vs. Ole Miss; 2024 at Texas A&M; 2025 vs. LSU.
(Permanent opponents in 2014: Home – Florida, Tennessee, Vanderbilt, Auburn; Away – Kentucky, Missouri, South Carolina. Sites alternate home and away through 2025.)

KENTUCKY – 2014 at LSU; 2015 vs. Auburn; 2016 at Alabama; 2017 vs. Ole Miss; 2018 at Texas A&M; 2019 vs. Arkansas; 2020 at Auburn; 2021 vs. LSU; 2022 at Ole Miss; 2023 vs. Alabama; 2024 at Arkansas; 2025 vs. Texas A&M.
(Permanent opponents in 2014: Home – Georgia, South Carolina, Vanderbilt, Mississippi State; Away – Florida, Missouri, Tennessee. Sites alternate home and away through 2025.)

LSU – 2014 vs. Kentucky; 2015 at South Carolina; 2016 vs. Missouri; 2017 at Tennessee; 2018 vs. Georgia; 2019 at Vanderbilt; 2020 vs. South Carolina; 2021 at Kentucky; 2022 vs. Tennessee; 2023 at Missouri; 2024 vs. Vanderbilt; 2025 at Georgia.
(Permanent opponents in 2014: Home – Alabama, Ole Miss, Mississippi State; Away – Arkansas, Auburn, Texas A&M, Florida. Sites alternate home and away through 2025.)

OLE MISS – 2014 vs. Tennessee; 2015 at Florida; 2016 vs. Georgia; 2017 at Kentucky; 2018 vs. South Carolina; 2019 at Missouri; 2020 vs. Florida; 2021 at Tennessee; 2022 vs. Kentucky; 2023 at Georgia; 2024 vs. Missouri; 2025 at South Carolina.
(Permanent opponents in 2014: Home – Alabama, Auburn, Mississippi State; Away – Arkansas, LSU, Texas A&M, Vanderbilt. Sites alternate home and away through 2025.)

MISSISSIPPI STATE – 2014 vs. Vanderbilt; 2015 at Missouri; 2016 vs. South Carolina; 2017 at Georgia; 2018 vs. Florida; 2019 at Tennessee; 2020 vs. Missouri; 2021 at Vanderbilt; 2022 vs. Georgia; 2023 at South Carolina; 2024 vs. Tennessee; 2025 at Florida.
(Permanent opponents in 2014: Home – Arkansas, Auburn, Texas A&M; Away – Alabama, LSU, Ole Miss, Kentucky. Sites alternate home and away through 2025.)

MISSOURI – 2014 at Texas A&M; 2015 vs. Mississippi State; 2016 at LSU; 2017 vs. Auburn; 2018 at Alabama; 2019 vs. Ole Miss; 2020 at Mississippi State; 2021 vs. Texas A&M; 2022 at Auburn; 2023 vs. LSU; 2024 at Ole Miss; 2025 vs. Alabama.
(Permanent opponents in 2014: Home – Georgia, Kentucky, Vanderbilt, Arkansas; Away – Florida, South Carolina, Tennessee. Sites alternate home and away through 2025.)

SOUTH CAROLINA – 2014 at Auburn; 2015 vs. LSU; 2016 at Mississippi State; 2017 vs. Arkansas; 2018 at Ole Miss; 2019 vs. Alabama; 2020 at LSU; 2021 vs. Auburn; 2022 at Arkansas; 2023 vs. Mississippi State; 2024 at Alabama; 2025 vs. Ole Miss.
(Permanent opponents in 2014: Home – Georgia, Missouri, Tennessee, Texas A&M; Away – Florida, Kentucky, Vanderbilt. Sites alternate home and away through 2025.)

TEXAS A&M – 2014 vs. Missouri; 2015 at Vanderbilt; 2016 vs. Tennessee; 2017 at Florida; 2018 vs. Kentucky; 2019 at Georgia; 2020 vs. Vanderbilt; 2021 at Missouri; 2022 vs. Florida; 2023 at Tennessee; 2024 vs. Georgia; 2025 at Kentucky.
(Permanent opponents in 2014: Home – Arkansas, LSU, Ole Miss; Away – Alabama, Auburn, Mississippi State, South Carolina. Sites alternate home and away through 2025.)

TENNESSEE – 2014 at Ole Miss; 2015 vs. Arkansas; 2016 at Texas A&M; 2017 vs. LSU; 2018 at Auburn; 2019 vs. Mississippi State; 2020 at Arkansas; 2021 vs. Ole Miss; 2022 at LSU; 2023 vs. Texas A&M; 2024 at Mississippi State; 2025 vs. Auburn.
(Permanent opponents in 2014: Home – Florida, Kentucky, Missouri, Alabama; Away – Georgia, South Carolina, Vanderbilt. Sites alternate home and away through 2025.)

VANDERBILT – 2014 at Mississippi State; 2015 vs. Texas A&M; 2016 at Auburn; 2017 vs. Alabama; 2018 at Arkansas; 2019 vs. LSU; 2020 at Texas A&M; 2021 vs. Mississippi State; 2022 at Alabama; 2023 vs. Auburn; 2024 at LSU; 2025 vs. Arkansas.

Just a couple of notes:

  • Tennessee will play LSU in Baton Rouge in 2022, 12 years after the Vols last trip to Death Valley.
  • When the 2019 Auburn-Florida game is played, it will have been eight years since the last matchup between the two storied football programs.  The next AU game against another longtime rival, Tennessee, won’t be until 2018.
  • Alabama last played Florida in Gainesville in 2011.  The Tide won’t do so again until 2022.  UA will go nine regular seasons  between matchups with South Carolina, the next one not coming until 2019.
  • Missouri will face Mississippi State for the first time as conference foes in 2020, eight years after the Tigers joined the SEC.
  • Texas A&M will face Georgia for the first time as conference foes in 2019, seven years after the Aggies joined the SEC.

Report: Ole Miss reportedly tried to bring Mississippi State down with it in NCAA probe

STARKVILLE, MS - NOVEMBER 28:  Damore'ea Stringfellow #3 of the Mississippi Rebels is pursued by Mark McLaurin #41 of the Mississippi State Bulldogs during the second quarter of a game at Davis Wade Stadium on November 28, 2015 in Starkville, Mississippi.  (Photo by Stacy Revere/Getty Images)
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Ah, rivalries. The sibling-like struggle across the sport is what makes the college football world spin, and we got a great example of that in a report detailing Ole Miss’s response to its impending charges.

As we know, a key charge against Ole Miss was the Rebels’ attempted payment of a sum between $13,000 and $15,000 to a recruit that ultimately signed with Mississippi State, and the Rebels’ response was to turn around and bring their Egg Bowl rivals down with them.

According to Neal McCready’s inside-the-program accounting of the process for Rebel Grove, Ole Miss has a recording of Leo Lewis‘s mother asking other programs for money:

Ole Miss, per multiple sources, possesses a recording, and has given the SEC a copy, of Lewis’ mother asking Ole Miss for money and detailing incentives she received from other programs, including Mississippi State.

Considering the sourcing on this one, the phrase “including Mississippi State” is anything but an accident. It’s the college football version defense of the “Yes, Mom, I may have taken the booze from the cabinet, but Little Brother drank some of it, too!” defense.

To which the NCAA will likely respond: “But I haven’t spent four years investigating him.”

While the “they cheated too” last gasp of a defense likely won’t extend Ole Miss a stay of execution, you have to at least respect the Rebels for trying it.

Kliff Kingsbury completes Texas Tech staff with D-line hire

FORT WORTH, TX - OCTOBER 29:  Head coach Kliff Kingsbury of the Texas Tech Red Raiders in the first half at Amon G. Carter Stadium on October 29, 2016 in Fort Worth, Texas.  (Photo by Ronald Martinez/Getty Images)
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Less than two weeks after a hole was created on his Texas Tech coaching staff, Kliff Kingsbury has made a move to fill it.

Tech confirmed early Thursday afternoon that Kingsbury has added Terrance Jamison as a Red Raiders assistant.  Specifically, Jamison will serve as the team’s defensive line coach.

Jamison replaces Kevin Patrick, who left earlier this month for the same job at North Carolina State after one season in Lubbock.

“We’re looking forward to adding Coach Jamison to our staff,” a statement from Kingsbury began. “He is someone that has built a strong reputation in the coaching community. He will be a tremendous asset on our defensive staff as well as in recruiting.”

The past three seasons, Jamison was the line coach at Florida Atlantic.  That was his first on-field job at the FBS level.

He’s also been a graduate assistant or quality control coach at Cal and alma mater Wisconsin.

“My family and I are grateful for the opportunity to join Coach Kingsbury’s staff,” Jamison said. “I’m excited about the potential of the defensive line group and working with (defensive coordinator David) Gibbs. I look forward to jumping right in and getting started with spring practices next week.”

Tennessee adds future home-and-home with BYU

KNOXVILLE, TN - NOVEMBER 10: Rajion Neal #20 of the Tennessee Volunteers runs into the end zone with an eight-yard touchdown reception in the first overtime against the Missouri Tigers at Neyland Stadium on November 10, 2012 in Knoxville, Tennessee. Missouri won 51-48 in four overtimes. (Photo by Joe Robbins/Getty Images)
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At the moment, BYU is looking at one hellacious start to the 2019 season.

Thursday afternoon, BYU announced tat it has added a future home-and-home series with Tennessee.  The Volunteers will serve as the host for a Sept. 7, 2019, matchup at Neyland Stadium in Knoxville, with the second game set for Sept. 1 or 2, 2023, at LaVell Edwards Stadium in Provo.

The 2019 game will mark the first-ever meeting between the two football programs.

“There’s something about those orange and white checkerboard end zones that shouts ‘Tradition!’,” BYU athletic director Tom Holmoe said in a statement. “When the opportunity to play a series with Tennessee presented itself, we didn’t blink. They’re a storied football program with a winning tradition, national championships, a classic stadium, incredible fans and hall of fame coaches.

“It will be a great experience to visit SEC country and play in Neyland Stadium, and later host Tennessee in Provo.”

BYU will kick off the 2019 season against Utah, followed by games against Tennessee, USC and Washington the next three weeks.  They also have a pair of mid-October games against Washington State and Boise State.

UT’s other non-conference games that season include Georgia State, Chattanooga and UAB.

Fighting Illini live up to nickname as Lovie Smith calls early end to practice amidst fisticuffs

LINCOLN, NE - OCTOBER 01: Head coach Lovie Smith of the Illinois Fighting Illini looks over the field against the Nebraska Cornhuskers at Memorial Stadium on October 1, 2016 in Lincoln, Nebraska. Nebraska defeated Illinois 31-16. (Photo by Steven Branscombe/Getty Images)
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Lovie Smith is not a big fan of fighting amongst his Illinois players, a lesson he shared with his aptly nicknamed Fighting Illini squad Wednesday evening.

According to the Decatur Herald & Review, Illinois’ spring practice session yesterday came to an abrupt and premature end after a fight between players broke out.  The names of those involved in the fisticuffs are not known as the media hadn’t been permitted to view practice.

From the Herald & Review‘s report:

…a source said Smith wanted to send a strong message about how he hates fighting and considers it an inexcusable transgression that robs the rest of the team of a chance to concentrate on getting better.

The field was cleared at about 5:35 p.m., nearly an hour before practice was scheduled to end. The players were sent to the locker room and the field was quickly cleared of equipment. Reporters were told there would be no interviews and were told to vacate the Memorial Stadium facility.

The Illini, which finished 3-9 in their first season under Smith last year, kicked off spring practice feb. 14 and will conclude it March 10 with the annual spring game.