Mike Slive

SEC spring meetings get underway this week

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The SEC spring meetings get underway this week in Destin, Florida. This means there should be some interesting quotes filtering out as the conference superpower discusses the potential future of college football and the conference’s plans to move forward. There will be plenty to discuss.

As previously mentioned, autonomy is expected to be the big topic of conversation. Later this summer the proposed reform measure allowing for autonomy among the power conferences — the ACC (including Notre Dame), Big 12, Big Ten, Pac-12 and SEC — will be put to a vote requiring two-thirds in favor of the proposal from the 65 member institutions within those conferences. With Big 12 commissioner Bob Bowlsby already saying his conference is discussing what to do with the extra powers, expect the SEC to be focusing on much of the same in Destin. With the SEC having more than enough to provide student-athletes more in terms of scholarship value and amenities, what to do with the extra allowances by the NCAA will be quite the talking point.

“Our presidents and chancellors have unanimously supported this effort to create autonomy in these areas that are related to student-athletes, so I anticipate that we will continue to support it,” SEC commissioner Mike Slive told the Associated Press, according to The Tennessean. “And I do anticipate that we will also want to see that the proposed model is modified so that that autonomy really means autonomy, that the five conferences can determine how their own legislative process will work.”

The SEC will also be likely to discuss the plans for the launch of the SEC Network, which will debut later this summer. Getting the network in as many homes is the key of course and there are battles to be had with cable companies in the SEC’s footprint. The Big Ten Network has been a solid model to base a conference network operation off of, but the SEC would be wise to look at the ups and downs the Big Ten and Pac-12 have experienced since launching conference-branded networks and learn from any mistakes those conferences have made before launching the brand new SEC Network.

Even before Kenny Chesney concert trashed it, plan was to replace Jordan-Hare turf

performs onstage during the 4th ACM Party For A Cause Festival at the Las Vegas Festival Grounds on April 3, 2016 in Las Vegas, Nevada.
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On April 23, country music star Kenny Chesney performed at Auburn’s Jordan-Hare Stadium — and it’s fair to say that he tore the place up. Chesney and various guests performed at the “Music and Miracles Festival,” one of the first concerts ever at Jordan-Hare. The goal was to raise a million dollars to fight hunger and cancer. And it was a party. More than 50,000 people were there.

“Sometimes,” Chesney said after it was over, “you feel the energy long before you hit the stage.”

With all that energy, yeah, the field took a significant beating.

Jordan-Hare

The Auburn grounds crew then announced via Twitter that they would resod the field at the end of May and get things back to normal in plenty of time for football. The story could have died there.

But, of course, stories don’t really die too quickly these days. I mean: Look at that field. First came the comments and the talk about how the flooring was kept down the whole time. Then came the backlash toward Chesney. There’s no need to explain just how holy the Jordan-Hare Stadium field is to Auburn football fans. When people saw the after photos — even though it is months until the season opener against Clemson — well let’s just say things were said.

Chesney, a big football fan who wrote the song “The Boys of Fall” about high school football in his town, was pretty troubled by the whole thing. See, Auburn had always planned on resodding the field after the concert. That was obviously the strategy after inviting Chesney to perform in the first place.

“The plan to host Kenny Chesney at Jordan-Hare Stadium always included a full field replacement following the event,” Auburn associate AD for Operation Jeremy Roberts said. “And the field cover strategy we approved took this into consideration.”

“The plan the school had in place,” concert production manager Ed Wannebo says, “had nothing to do with this concert … the sod was being torn out regardless.”

Ah well, what is it that Chesney sings in “The Boys of Fall?”

It’s knockin’ heads and talkin’ trash
It’s slingin’ mud and dirt and grass

Utah State dismisses starting guard Tyshon Mosley

Tyshon Mosley
Utah State athletics
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Expected to compete for All-Mountain West honors this season, Tyshon Mosley will instead be searching for a new college football home.

In a press release, Utah State announced that Mosley has been dismissed from the Aggies football program.  The only reason given was the standard violation of unspecified team rules.

In early August of last year, USU announced that Mosley was one of three players who had been suspended for the first two games of the 2015 season.  He returned from that suspension to start nine games at left guard.  At the end of last season, he was named honorable mention All-MWC.

After redshirting as a true freshman in 2013, Mosley started 11 of 14 games at left guard in 2014.

Abner Logan, projected starting LB, announces departure from Terps

Abner Logan
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Not long after putting spring practice 2016 to bed, Maryland’s linebacking corps has taken a significant and unexpected hit.

On Instagram over the weekend, Abner Logan announced that he has decided to transfer out of the Terrapins football program.  As Logan will be leaving the Terps as a graduate transfer, he would be eligible to play immediately in 2016 if his next destination is at the FBS level.

After tearing his ACL in August of last year, Logan missed the entire 2015 season.  He was projected as a starter at linebacker under first-year head coach D.J. Durkin.

Logan was suspended for the first six games of the 2014 season by the university for unspecified reasons.  He came back to play the final seven games of the year.

In 2013 as a redshirt freshman, he started four of the 12 games in which he played.

Mark Dantonio ‘disappointed’ watching Connor Cook’s draft free fall

EAST LANSING, MI - NOVEMBER 14: Head coach Mark Dantonio and Connor Cook #18 of the Michigan State Spartans look on during the game against the Maryland Terrapins at Spartan Stadium on November 14, 2015 in East Lansing, Michigan. Michigan State defeated Maryland 24-7. (Photo by Joe Robbins/Getty Images)
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Every year a player falls unexpectedly in the draft, and this year’s poster boy, aside from Laremy Tunsil‘s gas mask bong and Confederate flag imbroglio, on that front was Connor Cook.

The former Michigan State quarterback was thought by some to have a chance at landing toward the end of the first round, with most seeing him scooped up before the end of the second round. Instead, Cook watched as 99 other players, including six fellow quarterbacks, were selected before hearing his name called by the Oakland Raiders in the fourth round.

It was a mighty tumble for a prospect whose biggest flaw, according to draftniks, was leadership — he famously wasn’t elected as a captain of the Spartans in the preseason, which some considered quite revealing, and damning, for a three-year starter at quarterback.

As hard as it was on Cook, it was just as hard on his former head coach. After watching Cook lead his Spartans to a 34-5 record as a starter the last three years, Mark Dantonio found it difficult to digest his former player’s free fall.

“I was probably living through the entire thing, as well, watched the entire draft,” Dantonio said by way of mlive.com. “I was disappointed. I think that Connor is an excellent football player. He’s done a tremendous job for us here and for his football team, and a lot of that success that we’ve had can be credited to his play and his leadership on our football team. …

“I think it did wear on him as time went on, but he tried to continue to stay above it. I remember when Kirk Cousins was drafted and he was really disappointed in the fact that he had gone in the fourth round and they had drafted a guy in the second round and the first round, and what did that do for his future.”

Speaking of Cousins, the Washington Redskins quarterback who supplanted former Heisman winner Robert Griffin III as the starter, he offered up some encouragement to his fellow Spartan.