Wyoming v Boise State

Concern over losing top talent grows for non power conferences


The push for autonomy for the power conferences is about to leave its mark on the world of college football. The ability to provide more to student-athletes in the ACC, Big 12, Big Ten, Pac-12 and SEC is likely to be a true line between the haves and the have-nots in the sport, and that is starting to have some schools left behind growing with concern over losing the top players from their respective programs.

One thing likely to change with new rules and regulations down the pipeline is the transfer rules. As suggested by the Associated Press, coaches may lose the power to limit where players transferring out will or will not be able to move. Coaches listing any number of schools a player may not transfer to has long been a problem. Afterall, if this is all about giving student-athletes the best chance to succeed academically and get the most out of college, why would a football coach be able to tell a kid he cannot go to State U. just because they are a conference rival or they happen to appear on the upcoming football schedule two years down the road? The good news is that power appears to be fading with new rules. The flip side of that though is now there may be opportunities for some of the top players in the American Athletic Conference, Conference USA, the MAC, Mountain West Conference and Sun Belt Conference may now have an opportunity to transfer to a power conference program, where the benefits to players will be significantly greater.

Programs like Alabama, Florida State, Ohio State and Oregon may not be the programs the likes of Boise State, Cincinnati and UCF may have to worry about, but now the attraction of playing for a program like California, Purdue or Kentucky may start to become more enticing with greater benefits to be made available. Need an example to work with? Sun Belt commissioner Karl Benson has one ready for you.

Per the Associated Press;

”The example that I used is Kellen Moore at Boise State,” Sun Belt Commissioner Karl Benson said of the former star quarterback. ”He came in as an un-recruited player and by the time he was into his junior year he showed he had some unbelievable talent.

”If the transfer rules are eliminated and there’s free movement, does that allow that type of a player to quote ‘go up’ without any type of sitting out?”

It’s a pretty fascinating scenario that needs to be discussed before any vote takes place. Moore continued to become a household name the longer he was at Boise State. Would he have been a missing part for any team at a power conference school that could have put them over the edge by the time he was a senior?

Conferences also must know exactly what they can and cannot do with extended powers. Fortunately, these conferences have been preparing for what to do with the extra powers granted through autonomy, but nobody really knows what details will come until a vote by the 65 member schools of the ACC, Big 12, Big Ten, Pac-12 and SEC is held, and passed. Some around the country are still left wondering what will happen.

”I still haven’t gotten a good answer as to why transfer rules have been included in the autonomy bucket,” said SMU athletic director Rick Hart told the AP. ”I’m hopeful that will remain something that is voted upon by the entire membership.”

The new rules may not go into effect until 2015, but as it plays out every school will be looking to be prepared for whatever is coming our way.

Colorado loses starting LB Kenneth Olugbode for 4-6 weeks

during the Rocky Mountain Showdown at Sports Authority Field at Mile High on September 19, 2015 in Denver, Colorado.
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Colorado had already lost one starting inside linebacker to injury.  Now, the Buffs have lost another.

Kenneth Olugbode sustained an unspecified leg injury in the Week 5 loss to Oregon. As a result, Olugbode will miss 4-6 weeks.

At minimum, Olugbode will miss games against Arizona State, Arizona, Oregon State and UCLA, possibly returning for the Nov. 7 game against Stanford. Missing six weeks would see him miss the Stanford and USC games, returning, Nov. 21 vs. Washington State.

It’s going to be a big loss,” defensive tackle Justin Solis said according to the Denver Post. “It starts up front with us, the D-line. Not having K.O. out there is a huge loss, but it’s definitely something we accept as a challenge as a D-line. We’re going to step it up while he’s out.”

Olugbode had started all five games this season after starting all 12 games as a sophomore last season. Ryan Severson is expected to take his place in the starting lineup.

Dismissed Wolverine Logan Tuley-Tillman charged with three felonies

Logan Tuley-Tillman
Michigan Athletics

Back on September 10, it was announced that Jim Harbaugh had dismissed Logan Tuley-Tillman for “conduct unacceptable for a Michigan student-athlete.”  Now we know what that unacceptable conduct was.  Allegedly.

Wednesday morning, mlive.com is reporting, Tuley-Tillman was charged with three felonies stemming from a Sept. 4 incident in which he’s accused of filming a sex act with a woman without her knowledge. Tuley-Tillman was officially charged with two counts of capturing/distributing an image of an unclothed person and one count of using a computer to commit a crime.

From the report:

Capturing/distributing an image of an unclothed person is punishable by up to two years in prison, a fine of no more than $2,000, or both. Using a computer to commit a crime, in this case, would be punishable by up to 10 years in prison, a fine of no more than $5,000, or both.

The incident occurred in the 300 block of Catherine Street Sept. 4. Tuley-Tillman is accused of filming a portion of a sexual encounter with a woman without her knowledge and then transmitting it to his personal device without her permission, according to Ann Arbor police.

Tuley-Tillman was a four-star member of Brady Hoke‘s second-to-last UM recruiting class, rated as the No. 24 offensive tackle in the country and the No. 7 player at any position in the state of Illinois.  He played in one game as a redshirt freshman last season, the season opener against Appalachian State.

This season, he had been listed as the No. 2 left tackle and played in the 2015 opener.