Emmert once again suggests paying players would doom college sports

11 Comments

NCAA President Mark Emmert took the stand as a witness in the Ed O’Bannon antitrust lawsuit Thursday in one of the more anticipated days of witness questioning in some time for college sports fans. While on the stand Emmert had his moments he would likely wish to have back, but the statements made by the president of the NCAA, an organization that has been under attack from all angles in recent years, are now officially on the record and are fair to analyze.

One of the more notable statements from Emmert, aside form suggesting players should not be paid for playing or for their likenesses, was regurgitating the idea that paying college players would destroy college sports. It is an idea that has been flying around for a while, but few seem to take it too seriously as a threat to the pillars of college football, basketball and so on.

“To convert college sports into professional sports would be tantamount to converting it into minor league sports,” Emmert said, according to the Associated Press. “And we know that in the U.S. minor league sports aren’t very successful either for fan support or for the fan experience.”

Honestly, that last statement likely varies by organization or franchise, but so does attendance at college football games.

“It’s one of the most fundamental principles of the NCAA and intercollegiate athletics,” Emmert said. “They have always seen and assumed that intercollegiate athletics is about the notion that these are members of the student body. They’re not hired employees conducting games for entertainment. They’re not a random group of folks that just come together to play sports.”

One of the flaws in Emmert’s logic is a failure to recognize the NCAA of 2014 is not the same NCAA that was needed 20 or 50 years ago. Perhaps the NCAA as a whole has failed to evolve and keep pace with the changing landscape in collegiate sports. The student-athletes are more in view than ever before, and the TV money that flows as a result has grown exponentially over the years as well. Meanwhile, the NCAA’s logic appears to say if it was good enough in 1950, then it should be good enough now. That just cannot be the case.

Whether you believe players should be paid or not, the one thing that appears to be something everybody can agree on is the NCAA is in dire need of adapting to a new world. It is an organization that has shown its cracks, but it is not beyond being repairable. The NCAA can still play a role in college sports today, and it should remain a fixture in the sports scene. Changes are already in the works, and that could be a good thing. Emmert even deflected some questions about the NCAA’s role when asked about bowl games. The NCAA does not run bowl games, but with conferences beginning to take larger roles in organizing bowl games, even that statement can be put under some scrutiny.

The world is changing, but the NCAA and Emmert are not keeping up. That was put under a microscope on the witness stand Thursday.

Former Texas DT Jordan Elliott headed to Mizzou

Leave a comment

Former Texas defensive tackle Jordan Elliott will now be a Missouri Tiger, he announced on Friday.

Elliott chose Missouri to follow Brick Haley, his defensive line coach in Austin that landed at Mizzou after Charlie Strong‘s firing.

“They’re a program that’s on the come up, SEC ball is the highest level,” Elliott said in an interview with Power Mizzou. “Coach Haley is one of the best D-Line coaches out there. Missouri’s a powerhouse for defensive linemen. They’re coming and going first round every year. That’s real appealing to me.

“I talked to coach Haley and got it rolling.”

Elliott was a Signing Day addition to Strong’s 2016 class who was committed to Michigan before his late flip. He said that his one season in Austin amounted to a year-long version of buyer’s remorse.

“There’s a lot of speculation going around, but at the end of the day I just wasn’t happy there,” he said. “It’s nothing against the coaches at Texas, they’re great coaches. It’s a great program and I really learned a lot of things, but I just never really enjoyed Texas since I first got there.”

Elliott posted eight tackles and 1.5 TFLs in six appearances as a true freshman last season before suffering a torn MCL against Iowa State in October.

He would have been in line for starter’s snaps had he remained on Tom Herman‘s squad this fall. Instead, Elliott will sit out the 2017 campaign and have three years remaining to compete as a Tiger beginning in ’18.

 

WATCH: FCS player paralyzed in 2015 game vs. Georgia walks

Getty Images
Leave a comment

Tired of the continuous stream of negative college football news? Here ya go.

During a September 2015 game against Georgia, Southern wide receiver Devon Gales sustained a severe spinal injury that left him paralyzed and hospitalized for five months. This week, Gales used Twitter to offer up a very encouraging and inspiring update — the former wide receiver, with the assist of a couple of physical therapists, taking a dozen steps.

On the way indeed.

In February, Georgia announced that it was launching “Drive to Build a Dawg House” for Gales and his family.

Nebraska WR Stanley Morgan avoids felony pot possession charge

Getty Images
2 Comments

One of the top playmakers in Nebraska’s passing game has avoided what was originally a serious legal charge.

According to KETV-TV in Omaha, Stanley Morgan was arrested following a traffic stop May 6 in Port Orange, Fla., for possession of 21.4 grams of marijuana; according to the penal code in the state of Florida, possession of more than 20 grams of weed is considered a felony.  However, the television station wrote, “prosecutors charged the case as ‘possession of cannabis not more than 20 grams,’ making it a misdemeanor.”

Why the the charge against Morgan went from a potential felony to a misdemeanor — or reduced as the Associated Press reported — wasn’t detailed.  A misdemeanor possession of paraphernalia charge was dropped as well.

Cornhuskers defensive back Antonio Reed was also in the vehicle that was driven by his teammate and was charged with misdemeanor pot possession as well.

“Head Coach Mike Riley and the Athletics Department are aware of a recent incident in Florida involving Stanley Morgan Jr.,” a statement from the university began. “We will have no additional comment until we have all information regarding this matter.”

Morgan’s 33 receptions for 453 yards were second on the team last season.  With Jordan Westerkamp‘s departure, the junior is the Cornhuskers’ leading returning receiver.

Also a junior, Reed played in 22 games last season.  He was credited with 22 tackles.

Ex- Utah DB Jordan Fogal tweets he’s transferring to Colorado State

Getty Images
Leave a comment

Last month, Jordan Fogal used Twitter to announce his decision to transfer from Utah. This month, he’s taken to the same social media website to reveal his new college football home.

In a tweet, Fogal acknowledged that he be enrolling in a Masters program at Colorado State and will be playing football for the Rams. While the school has yet to confirm the safety’s move, he is now being followed on Twitter by head coach Mike Bobo.

As a grad transfer, Fogal will be eligible to play immediately in 2017 at CSU.

After spending two seasons at the junior college level, Fogal played in 11 games the past two years. Fogal’s two interceptions last season were tied for fourth on the team.

The defensive back’s 2015 season came to a premature end after three games because of an injury. He then played in eight games in 2016 for the Utes.