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Jim Delany the doomsday prepper

Jim Delany

Big Ten commissioner Jim Delany is one of the most powerful people in college sports, so when he makes statements suggesting the possible implosion of the college sports scene, people will listen to what he has to say. Delany may be a wise person who understands the inner workings of the game today than some might ever be able to comprehend, but he seemed to go to a wild extreme while testifying as a witness in the Ed O’Bannon antitrust trial in California on Friday.

Delany suggested the Rose Bowl would actually be in jeopardy if players were being paid to play football. For the Big Ten, the loss of the Rose Bowl would be as close to doomsday as it could get given the conference’s dedication to the storied bowl game, its tradition and long-standing relationship between the Big Ten, Pac-12 and the Rose Bowl.

“There wouldn’t be a Rose Bowl if either [the Pac-12] or [the Big Ten] were operating in a very different wavelength in terms of paying players,” Delany said Friday while on the witness stand. Delany was suggesting the game would be at risk if one conference was paying players while the other was not.

Of course, if both conferences allowed for paying players, perhaps Delany’s tune would change. While the antitrust lawsuit is not specifically about directly paying players to pay, the topic continues to be a boiling point for the trial and was one that was discussed at great length on Thursday and Friday with Delany and NCAA president Mark Emmert taking the witness stand.

“These games are owned by the institution, and the notion of paying athletes for participation in these games is foreign to the notion of amateurism,” Delany said.

Delany echoed some of the same thoughts expressed by Emmert when discussing amateurism. To paraphrase, the two believe that the amateurism model set up decades ago, in a different era, should be good enough to fit in with today’s world. Delany is quite the visionary, and his testimony overall may have done more damage than good for the NCAA’s case, but what these two sometimes fail to see is today’s college sports scene is not comparable to what existed in previous decades. Adapting is the key. Delany knows that, as evidenced by Big Ten moves since he has been named commissioner of the conference. The Big Ten has added four schools and started the first truly successful conference-specific cable network under his watch.

Would the Rose Bowl, the granddaddy of them all and the true crown jewel of the Big Ten (and Pac-12) really be in much jeopardy of players were being paid? If the day does come, expect Delany to have his shelter to be stocked with nothing but the finest preserved foods and supplies and a direct feed to the Big Ten Network running day and night.

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24 Responses to “Jim Delany the doomsday prepper”
  1. thekatman says: Jun 21, 2014 2:21 PM

    The sky is falling rhetoric is a diversion from the fact that the NCAA and the universities are making millions of the back of these kids, and yes the kids get a full ride schollie but that schollie in no way matches what non schollie students have to pay to thrive in a college setting. And using the likeness of a student athletes to make money without a percentage going to the SA is criminal. Always had been but no one male a car or if it. Now there’s a case for it.

  2. huck222 says: Jun 21, 2014 2:26 PM

    Thank u!

  3. thekatman says: Jun 21, 2014 2:29 PM

    No one made a case for it….

  4. Scott Hevel says: Jun 21, 2014 2:30 PM

    College football as we know it will be over if they go to a pay for play model. End of story.

  5. corvusrex96 says: Jun 21, 2014 2:45 PM

    Everyone is so obsessed with the possible wrecking of the current inequitable system rather than starting from the point that the people who do the work should be paid . It is really that simple , on some level the NCAA sounds like people in the 1860s arguing if you outlawed slavery it would wreck the economy of the south

  6. wolfman55h says: Jun 21, 2014 2:48 PM

    End the hypocrisy. Eliminate scholarships. Let the NFL foot the bill for a farm team system. I’d still go watch my alma mater play even if the quality of play is depleted. That’s the sacred cow nobody wants to slaughter. In college the game is about allegiance not athleticism.

  7. huck222 says: Jun 21, 2014 3:02 PM

    Not everyone is going tithe NFL, so they shouldn’t fit the bill… But what needs to be realized is that NCAA has a “College Footall & Basketball” partnership in making revenue with its players! White America always trying to justify free labor for no compensation! A scholarship should be the starting point after that it should “Communism” as the system….. There is no one way of thinking! You have to implement all to make sense of shit….. We all in this together! Think folks…. :-)

  8. longtallsam says: Jun 21, 2014 4:02 PM

    Justify free labor??? There is nothing free about it! A D-1 football player on full scholarship is making anywhere from $25,000 to $60.000 per year, depending of the school they attend. Not bad for a high school graduate. Plus, if they are from a low income family, they can get up to $5500 per year in Pell grant money. These players are well compensated!

  9. ruggyup says: Jun 21, 2014 4:43 PM

    Uh, longtallsam, it is also worth noting that many of these full scholarship players have difficulty even showing up for classes in subjects no one else has heard of and occupy a special place in society being nearly exempt from punishment for misdemeanors, assaults, felonies, etc. How about a simple government solution, quadruple their Pell grant monies and waive any repayment requirement.

  10. gbrglax says: Jun 21, 2014 6:08 PM

    Why not take a step back to the D-III model? Problem solved.
    Ok, it would never occur because of the money involved with ABC, CBS, ESPN, and your cable company! That is to whom we are now beholden for these issues, not the players.
    Ultimately, if you have the networks and NCAA set up a fund for players, allocating a portion of each contract to a fund which is accessible upon graduation from a D-1 university, the costs will only get passed back to us thru higher cable rates.

  11. 4thqtrsaint says: Jun 21, 2014 6:32 PM

    Please, college players aren’t asking to be paid like NFL players. No school is going to go broke if you paid each player $5k/season even.
    Maybe some of these coaches and athletic directors could take less so players can have some living money. They make enough money anyway.
    Funny how colleges seem to find money to throw at head coaches.

  12. bigdinla says: Jun 21, 2014 7:07 PM

    Ok firsts off, any one throwing out the slavery angle needs to stop. It’s pure hyperbole and just ridiculous. The problem with pay for play is the inequity between the big 5 and the rest. Also you forget about title nine. If they pay the football players they will have to pay females as well. As well as all the other sports. This isn’t the matter of just paying 85 players per school. It’s more like paying 500 players per school. That would cripple all but the most profitable schools.

  13. 4thqtrsaint says: Jun 21, 2014 7:44 PM

    Doesn’t matter about Big 5, little vs big school. We’re not talking NFL money. An extra $5k per player, per season for every college football program in the country. Make the players financially qualify first. Player assistance program.
    $5k is a random number, I’m just giving an example. The Colleges have to decide on what that would be. It wouldn’t even have to cost the schools anything extra, if it came out of the AD’s pay.

  14. mulder1127mulder1127 says: Jun 21, 2014 8:26 PM

    Who cares, the Rose Bowl and all other bowls are exhibition games that don’t mean anything. Now that there is a playoff we can determine on the field who is Champion.

  15. thraiderskin says: Jun 21, 2014 10:26 PM

    What has changed over the decades that makes it a good idea to pay college athletes? I think something people are missing here as well, while the NFL is able to set a salary cap, the teams are forbidden for setting a hard cap on individual players, its called collusion. So exactly what would stop one college from offering up more than the 5k some of you think it will take to end this issue? It will start with a couple grand, but it wont stay there for long. This is one Pandora’s Box that should absolutely remain closed.

  16. joejacks says: Jun 22, 2014 7:07 AM

    Delany is being payed by the colleges making billions off exposing athletes playing this game. It’s time for the NCAA to pay up to these players in the form of a true free ride and paid expenses. That is the very least.

  17. pawloosa says: Jun 22, 2014 8:51 AM

    Joejacks….
    Athletes already get a true free ride… And what exactly are “paid expenses”???

  18. dmarado says: Jun 22, 2014 10:14 AM

    What has changed over the decades that makes it a good idea to pay college athletes? I think something people are missing here as well, while the NFL is able to set a salary cap, the teams are forbidden for setting a hard cap on individual players, its called collusion. So exactly what would stop one college from offering up more than the 5k some of you think it will take to end this issue? It will start with a couple grand, but it wont stay there for long. This is one Pandora’s Box that should absolutely remain closed.

    ——–
    What has changed, IMO is that sports is no longer a diversion but a career option for D1 athletes and a massive revenue generator for schools, conferences, and networks. I can think of no other pursuit except sex workers where those doing the work get less of the profit. Couple that with, and lets not kid ourselves, the fact that many D1 athletes aren’t prepare for the education they are given and you have the most exploitive system in America that remains legal.

  19. packhawk04 says: Jun 22, 2014 12:49 PM

    Everyone needs to understand that you would need to pay 500-600 athletes. If you pay each one 5k like that person keeps suggesting, and just simply “take it out of the ads pay”, then we should do some research and see how many ads make 2.5 million a year. Instead of doing that work, cant we just eliminate every athletic program at non power conference schools? That is going to eventually happen anyway you do it, so why not start there?

  20. brownsmakemecrazy says: Jun 22, 2014 9:34 PM

    Delaney is a damn crook. If you think this is all about amateurish dbag then why do the corrupt schools in your corrupt conferences charge 250 bucks per ticket on Avg to go watch your crappy teams play boring football. This guy is a scumbag and a liar.

    Good take your ball and go home scammer. I will be glad when your joke of a conference is off of my TV. YOU can’t hang with the SEC or any good teams for that matter. You and Emmert are an embarrassment to honesty and integrity

  21. ytownjoe says: Jun 22, 2014 11:06 PM

    Not one word about coaches being paid $3 million a year?

  22. bubblehead22 says: Jun 23, 2014 12:12 AM

    The notion that college athletes are not being paid is ridiculous. Over a trillion dollars, yes a trillion in this country none of which is paid by student athletes.

    If we want yo discuss what public institutions do with the profits of college athletics that’s fine. Those profits are not justification to falsely say student athletes are not paid.

  23. outlaw53 says: Jun 23, 2014 4:37 PM

    Jim Delany is a prime example of what is wrong with college athletics. The issue with him isn’t paying college players…but rather having them unseat his overwhelming power over the college game. During the Ohio State scandal, Mr. Delany did everything in his power to circumvent the NCAA investigation into that school…even throwing his support in the corner of the incomparable (liar) Ole Sweater Vest himself. I’m not in favor of paying college athletes…but I’m not in favor of Jim Delany either.

  24. packergator says: Jun 24, 2014 1:53 PM

    Jim Delany – the ultimate tool of the NCAA.

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