Urban Meyer wants to duplicate culture of Popovich’s Spurs

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Good coaches often take notes and cues from other good coaches. If imitation is the cheapest form of flattery, then Ohio State head coach Urban Meyer is getting a bargain by observing what makes the San Antonio Spurs head coach Gregg Popovich tick. Popovich has led the Spurs to five NBA championships, the fifth coming last week against LeBron James and the two-time defending NBA champion Miami Heat. The Spurs not only won that series, but they were in firm control of the series from start to finish, winning in five games.

What is it about the Spurs that has led to so much success? As Meyer suggests, it is the culture around the franchise.

“[Popovich] talks about the culture, and if you don’t fit in the culture, you’ve got to go,” Meyer said in a Q&A with The Columbus Dispatch. “Now, it’s easier when you’re talking about six or 10 guys (on a basketball team) instead of 120 (on a football team). But that’s what I got out of it.”

Basketball fans and analysts will say something similar. The Spurs lack the true icons of the game that generate buzz the way LeBron, Kobe Bryant or Michael Jordan ever have, but the Spurs buy into a different philosophy, one that is unselfish in style. That same philosophy can translate to any sport and can often be found somewhere on any championship team. That is what Meyer hopes to be able to develop in Columbus.

“We really study the NBA,” Meyer said when asked how much he pays attention to the pro basketball league. “This is exactly what we’re trying to get done here — culture, culture, culture.”

Ohio State is coming off a season that ended with a two-game losing streak in postseason play. After winning the first 24 games since Meyer was introduced as head coach, Ohio State was upended by Michigan State in the Big Ten championship game and then taken out by Clemson in the Orange Bowl. The Buckeyes are among the top favorites in the Big Ten once again in 2014 and are considered a strong candidate to land one of the four playoff spots in the new College Football Playoff.

If the Buckeyes are to get over what happened last season, embracing that Spurs-like culture will be a good starting point. In fact, the Spurs would be a good example for almost any team out there, regardless of sport.

2017 College Football Bowl Projections after Week 12

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Sad as it is to say but we’ve got only one week left in the regular season for nearly everybody in the Power Five conferences and are just two weeks out from the all important Selection Sunday. The College Football Playoff race has turned into a modified eight team playoff with all of the conference title games going on and the continued jockeying for a New Year’s Six bid and other major bowl berths is filtering down to teams far and wide.

With all that in mind, CFTalk decided to peer into our crystal ball and take a look at the postseason picture — figuring out which teams wind up in certain bowl games prior to the official announcement. Running through all the scenarios, here’s how the bowl picture could play out from the final four to the very first one on December 16th:

College Football Playoff

Bowl Teams
Rose Bowl No. 2 Clemson No. 3 Oklahoma
Sugar Bowl No. 1 Alabama No. 4 Ohio State

New Year’s Six

Bowl Teams
Peach Bowl UCF TCU
Fiesta Bowl USC Wisconsin
Orange Bowl Miami Georgia
Cotton Bowl Notre Dame Penn State

2016 FBS Bowl Games

Bowl Teams
New Mexico Bowl Colorado State North Texas
Las Vegas Bowl Oregon Boise State
Cure Bowl UTSA Georgia State
Camellia Bowl Arkansas State Akron
New Orleans Bowl Southern Miss Troy
Boca Raton Bowl Temple Marshall
Frisco Bowl Houston Central Michigan
Gasparilla Bowl USF Florida Atlantic
Bahamas Bowl Florida International Northern Illinois
Famous Idaho Potato Bowl Wyoming Ohio
Birmingham Bowl UTSA Memphis
Armed Forces Bowl Army* UAB
Dollar General Bowl Toledo App. State
Hawaii Bowl Fresno State SMU
Cactus Bowl Kansas State Utah
Quick Lane Bowl Western Michigan UNLV
Heart of Dallas Bowl Western Kentucky UCLA
Independence Bowl Florida State Arizona State
Pinstripe Bowl Boston College Purdue
Texas Bowl Iowa State Missouri
Foster Farms Bowl Stanford Iowa
Military Bowl Virginia Navy
Camping World Bowl Virginia Tech Oklahoma State
Alamo Bowl Texas Washington State
Holiday Bowl Washington San Diego State
Belk Bowl Wake Forest South Carolina
Sun Bowl Louisville Arizona
Music City Bowl Kentucky Northwestern
TaxSlayer Bowl N.C. State LSU
Liberty Bowl West Virginia Texas A&M
Arizona Bowl Utah State N.M. State
Outback Bowl Mississippi State Michigan
Citrus Bowl Michigan State Auburn

*Accepted bowl invite

Coaches poll sees minimal movement after routine weekend

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Without much drama around the country this weekend in college football, there were very few changes seen in this week’s updated Amway Coaches Poll. While three teams dropped out to make some room for some fresh faces at the bottom of the poll, the top 12 remained unchanged from last week. No. 1 Alabama remains atop the coaches poll with all 64 first-place votes cast in their favor.

A few schools making some movement of note this week included No. 17 Mississippi State and No. 18 LSU moving up two and three spots, respectively. No. 20 Stanford also moved up three places this week. The biggest drop within the top 25 this week was taken by No. 21 Oklahoma State, with the Cowboys falling eight spots after a home loss to Kansas State. The Wildcats remain unranked in this week’s coaches poll.

Michigan, NC State, and West Virginia each fell out of the top 25 this week following their respective losses. That made room for No. 23 Northwestern, No. 24 Boise State, and No. 25 Virginia Tech.

Here is this week’s full coaches poll:

  1. Alabama (64 first-place votes)
  2. Miami
  3. Clemson
  4. Wisconsin
  5. Oklahoma
  6. Auburn
  7. Georgia
  8. Ohio State
  9. Notre Dame
  10. USC
  11. Penn State
  12. UCF
  13. TCU
  14. Washington
  15. Washington State
  16. Memphis
  17. Mississippi State
  18. LSU
  19. USF
  20. Stanford
  21. Oklahoma State
  22. Michigan State
  23. Northwestern
  24. Boise State
  25. Virginia Tech

Defending national champion James Madison takes No. 1 seed in FCS playoffs

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Last week the playoff field for Division 2 and Division 3 was set, and we are still two weeks away from learning what four teams will compete in the fourth College Football Playoff. Today it was the FCS playoff field that was unveiled for the first time. Not surprisingly, defending national champion James Madison, the top-ranked team in FCS, took the top spot in the 24-team field.

At 11-0, it was expected the Dukes would be the number one overall seed. The Colonial Athletic Association champions are in the FCS playoffs for a fourth-straight season. The number two seed is a familiar name to those following FCS football. North Dakota State (10-1) took the second overall seed in the playoff field. The five-time national champs remains a force to reckon with once again and will hope to get a shot at playoff revenge against James Madison in this year’s championship game. It was James Madison that eliminated the Bison from the postseason last year with a 27-17 upset in the semifinals.

JMU went on to top Bo Pelini and Youngstown State in the championship game after the unseeded Penguins went on a miraculous run to the championship game. Youngstown State had taken out the No. 3 seed Jacksonville State (40-24) and No. 2 seed Eastern Washington (40-38) before falling against the No. 4 seeded Dukes. Youngstown State did not reach the postseason this year.

Jacksonville State takes the three-seed, followed by Central Arkansas, South Dakota State, Sam Houston State, Wofford and Southern Utah. Other automatic entrants through conference championship automatic qualifiers include Kennesaw State, Central Connecticut State, Lehigh, and San Diego. At-large teams making the field include Northern Arizona, Weber State, Monmouth, Elon, New Hampshire, Stony Brook, South Dakota, Northern Iowa, Western Illinois, Furman, Samford, and Nicholls State.

You can view the full bracket HERE.

Kyle Whittingham attempts to defend bizarre timeout decision that doomed Utes vs. Washington

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If you went to bed a little early on Saturday night then the chances are pretty good you missed one of the more baffling coaching decisions of the season. With Washington and Utah tied at 30-30 after the Huskies battled back in the second half, Washington received the football with under a minute to play. Washington seemed to be playing for overtime with a short run to keep the clock rolling when Utah head coach Kyle Whittingham called a timeout. This gave Washington head coach Chris Petersen a chance to change the mindset on his sideline and go for the win before overtime, and it led to a game-winning field goal as time expired.

Whittingham essentially gave Washington a chance to win the Huskies had no intention of playing for in regulation, and it may end up costing Utah a spot in a postseason bowl game. After the game, Whittingham defended his decision-making by saying he was attempting to be aggressive, suggesting that if Washington really was playing for overtime, they would have taken a knee.

“You’d have to ask Chris that. But if they were not being aggressive they would have taken a knee,” Whittingham explained. “What’s the point in running a play if they’re not going to try to at least maneuver into field goal range. So we called timeout, had them in decent field position, second and eight or second and nine, and one incomplete pass and another timeout if they decide to run the ball. So it was a long shot, but we’re just trying to win and it obviously didn’t work out.

Here’s the play where Utah called the timeout. It sure seemed as though Washington had no real intention of playing for a field goal unless Utah made a huge mistake, which as it turned out they did,

Whittingham had no legitimate reason to call for the timeout and admitted it was a decision he would take back given the hindsight of knowing how the game would eventually end.

“In hindsight, I probably wouldn’t have called the timeout,” Whittingham said. “But at the time, we were just trying to be aggressive and get the ball back to a guy who has about a sixty-yard range field goal wise.”

Petersen said after the game they were merely trying to run Myles Gaskin to see if there would be a crack or a big play. That never developed, but the timeout changed the situation for Washington. Petersen, not one to go out and trash an opposing coach over a questionable decision that benefits him, said he understood what Whittingham was trying to do.

“We wanted to run the ball and see if we could pop through with Myles and maybe get a 10-yard run,” Petersen said. “I get what Kyle was trying to do. You have to play aggressive in these situations.”

No, you do not.

There is a time to play with aggression, but this was not the time. Washington was settling on playing overtime, and Whittingham overthought the situation and got burned by it.