Skip to content

D3 school sued by former player over lack of concussion care

Never before has there been so much awareness about head trauma in sports, especially football. Concussions put careers in danger and now there seems to be more caution regarding the injuries than any past generation received. Sometimes though there are shortcomings with troubling consequences later on in life.

Alex Isaac, a former football player at Division 3 Baldwin Wallace University in Ohio has filed a lawsuit against the school, accusing the school of failing to recognize, diagnose, test or treat him for symptoms of a concussion, as reported by USA Today. According to the report, Isaac states he was allowed to play in full-contact activity without receiving the proper evaluations for head trauma. Isaac claims to have reported symptoms that went untreated.

The NCAA and school each have standard procedures in place for head trauma care, although ultimately the decision on how to determine when players may return to the field is in the hands of each individual school. It is Isaac’s claim these were ignored in order to rush him back to the field.

“Not only did Baldwin Wallace medical staff ignore the signs and symptoms of Isaac’s clear concussion, but they did so repeatedly and in the face of NCAA and college-wide protocols set in place to keep student-athletes safe,”said Steve Berman, an attorney representing Isaac in the lawsuit. “Isaac clearly identified his symptoms to medical staff, and Hagens Berman [the law firm filing the lawsuit] finds it deeply disturbing that he was encouraged to continue participating in games and practices.”

On a somewhat related note, on Tuesday Utah announced quarterback Travis Wilson was given medical clearance to return to football activities after seeing his 2013 season end short due to head trauma.

Permalink 5 Comments Feed for comments Latest Stories in: Rumor Mill, Top Posts
5 Responses to “D3 school sued by former player over lack of concussion care”
  1. icallbs81 says: Jun 25, 2014 3:20 PM

    Dear NCAA

    Please create a waiver of some kind so that every player and their mother can not sue schools for reasons state above. Stop playing football if you are worried about concussions. There are plenty of other sports to play.

    I think everyone who has ever played and watched football knows there are some kind of dangers. It isn’t rocket science.

  2. psly2124 says: Jun 25, 2014 6:12 PM

    Have these kids ever heard if getting a second opinion. I guess the lack of education by them and there parents expect the government to make every decision for them.

  3. forwarduntotang says: Jun 26, 2014 1:35 PM

    I smell lots of ignorance in both the previously posted comments. If you were aware at all, sports doctors are now considering any and all head injuries sustained with *any* number of 28 or so symptoms. Doctors have known this, and they often do not relay information well to high schools and universities until some time after they learn it (simply poor communication). In the last two years, with concussions becoming a hot topic, they have made them a priority to assess and track them, but head injuries are all too often brushed under the rug by players, and more importantly, by staff, which is important to note in this situation. Coaches KNOW it is one of their duties to handle these situations, it is a responsibility of theirs to tend to this, just like it is a responsibility of the training/medical staff. Any and all symptoms should have been treated on the spot, like mine were. I saw doctors every few weeks for more than 7 months over my symptoms and situation, and any teammates of mine that also suffered concussions saw the same treatment. Just because Alex Isaac suffered his a year or two sooner, does he deserve to face a compromised lifestyle without proper help? We as athletes in a contact sport all know we take major risks when we step onto the field, but we had no idea, until just recently, just how severe concussions be. The medical community here is aware, and if they can not be proactive, they should at least be reactive and do the best they can to make up for it. As collegiate student-athletes we are provided a secondary insurance by the school, and that quickly disappears once you are no longer with the program, even if the injury is prolonged. The insurance policy should still cover those sustained injuries until the injury is fully taken care of, or at least until graduation if you quit the sport before leaving the school at the D-III level, where budgets are tighter. And for the record we do pay a fee for the insurance individually, it isn’t handed to us on a silver platter. So, he may not deserve a million dollar compensation settlement for his troubles, but he deserves the treatment that later classes received.

    Source: Former college football player, sustained four concussions and worked with one of the most prominent sports concussion specialists at the Cleveland Clinic as well as other doctors, in addition to multiple research papers I have personally done on the topic of concussions and their newly discovered implications.

  4. forwarduntotang says: Jun 26, 2014 1:36 PM

    If you two commenters were aware at all, sports doctors are now considering any and all head injuries sustained with *any* number of 28 or so symptoms. Doctors have known this, and they often do not relay information well to high schools and universities until some time after they learn it (simply poor communication). In the last two years, with concussions becoming a hot topic, they have made them a priority to assess and track them, but head injuries are all too often brushed under the rug by players, and more importantly, by staff, which is important to note in this situation. Coaches KNOW it is one of their duties to handle these situations, it is a responsibility of theirs to tend to this, just like it is a responsibility of the training/medical staff. Any and all symptoms should have been treated on the spot, like mine were. I saw doctors every few weeks for more than 7 months over my symptoms and situation, and any teammates of mine that also suffered concussions saw the same treatment. Just because Alex Isaac suffered his a year or two sooner, does he deserve to face a compromised lifestyle without proper help? We as athletes in a contact sport all know we take major risks when we step onto the field, but we had no idea, until just recently, just how severe concussions be. The medical community here is aware, and if they can not be proactive, they should at least be reactive and do the best they can to make up for it. As collegiate student-athletes we are provided a secondary insurance by the school, and that quickly disappears once you are no longer with the program, even if the injury is prolonged. The insurance policy should still cover those sustained injuries until the injury is fully taken care of, or at least until graduation if you quit the sport before leaving the school at the D-III level, where budgets are tighter. And for the record we do pay a fee for the insurance individually, it isn’t handed to us on a silver platter. So, he may not deserve a million dollar compensation settlement for his troubles, but he deserves the treatment that later classes received.

    Source: Former college football player, sustained four concussions and worked with one of the most prominent sports concussion specialists at the Cleveland Clinic as well as other doctors, in addition to multiple research papers I have personally done on the topic of concussions and their newly discovered implications.

  5. forwarduntotang says: Jun 26, 2014 1:37 PM

    Sorry for the double post, my computer froze after the Internet here flashed.

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to leave a comment. Not a member? Register now!