Cardinal Bird, Charlie Strong

A semi-quick guide to 2014’s college football realignment changes

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On Tuesday the latest round of conference realignment musical chairs will begin. If you have lost track of where every school is playing, have no worries because you are surely not alone. In an attempt to keep you updated on all of the changes coming your way this week (Tuesday, July 1 is the official realignment day), here is a rundown of all of the changes taking place and which school is moving where this year. For those planning ahead, there is a look at the potential realignment scene to watch for each conference as well.

American Athletic Conference

Adding: Tulane, Tulsa, East Carolina

Losing: Louisville (ACC), Rutgers (Big Ten)

What was once the Big East is now taking on more of a Conference USA 2.0 feel with the additions of Tulane, Tulsa and East Carolina from Conference USA. The conference will lose Louisville to the ACC and Rutgers to the Big Ten, which hurts the conference’s profile from a competitive standpoint as well as a television marketing standpoint. Navy will be coming aboard as a football-only member starting in 2015, which will give the conference a 12-member football conference and allow for the introduction of a conference championship game.

Realignment Watch: The conference could still be at risk of future changes despite feeling comfortable with the situation now. Cincinnati and Connecticut are two programs that could keep a watchful eye on the lookout for potential landing spots in future conference realignment changes. If the conference does lose any other members, could an invite to Army or UMass be inevitable?

ACC

Adding: Louisville

Losing: Maryland (Big Ten)

Maryland, a founding member of the ACC will leave the conference in search of bigger paychecks from the Big Ten. The divorce between Maryland and the ACC has been bitter and those hurt feelings could linger for a while until all exit fees are settled. The ACC likely comes out feeling pretty good about the situation though with the addition of Louisville, a school with a tremendous string of success as an athletics program. The ACC stays at 14 members and continues with the football-scheduling partnership with Notre Dame.

Realignment Watch: With 14 members, the ACC looks to be about as stable as it has been in some time. The grant of rights agreement gives each ACC school more comfort in the changing landscape of collegiate athletics and the future could be bright with the possible addition of an ACC network. Unless there is a need for further expansion due to a Division IV split, the ACC is probably in a good situation.

Big Ten

Adding: Maryland, Rutgers

Losing: None

The Big Ten will increase membership from 12 members to 14 with the second conference expansion in four years (Nebraska joined in 2011). The additions of Maryland and Rutgers do little to add to the football profile of the conference, but the goal of gaining exposure in the eastern TV markets is the strategy at play here. The expansion also means the Big Ten has to reshuffle the divisions, which means no more Leaders and Legends (now that you probably just figured it out, or not). Maryland and Rutgers will join Indiana, Michigan, Michigan State, Ohio State and Penn State in the new east division.

Realignment Watch: The Big Ten may have already been in a stable position after adding Nebraska, but at this point the conference has probably reached as far as it will be able to successfully. The risk of losing any members is likely minimal given the resources and money involved with being a part of the Big Ten. The only possible loss the Big Ten would probably see would be Nebraska making a return to the Big 12, but that does not appear to be something to seriously be concerned about. The Big Ten is not likely to expand any more, so we can probably forget about Texas, Oklahoma or even Notre Dame.

Big 12

No changes.

Realignment Watch: The Big 12 has 10 members, and the conference has made it clear it is perfectly fine with that number. The big question to be answered in the coming year or two is what does the impact of a conference championship game carry in the College Football Playoff. If a conference championship game proves to be a difference-maker, the Big 12 might think about acting quickly on getting back to 12 members. That would be good news for a program like BYU, which the Big 12 has avoided time and time again. Cincinnati? UCF and/or USF? Keep an eye on the Big 12, just in case.

Conference USA

Adding: Western Kentucky

Losing: Tulane, Tulsa, East Carolina (all to AAC)

Conference USA is a conference investing in potential growth with smaller and younger programs. Western Kentucky comes aboard this season to keep the conference’s membership at 14. The conference already added a handful of schools last season after losing UCF, Houston, Memphis and SMU, to the American last season, so not much was needed to fill the holes left by these upcoming changes.

Realignment Watch: Conference USA looks to be a conference that will follow in the domino effect of other conference changes. Unless another conference makes any moves, Conference USA looks to be sitting still on changes. No school will be leaving to join the Sun Belt and the MAC doesn’t look to be a threat for poaching any members, so all eyes should remain on any changes that take place in the American. If the AAC needs to fill some holes in membership, Conference USA could be the target.

MAC

No changes, although this will be the final season with UMass as an associate member. The Minutemen will leave the conference after this season and continue to weigh options for the football program’s future.

Realignment Watch: With the upcoming loss of UMass, the MAC will return to a 12-member conference. There is no need for any expansion within the MAC, and the conference seems to be perfectly situated with membership. Unless any school made an attempt to flirt with another conference for any reason (American or Conference USA would be only potential conferences to worry about), the MAC looks to be staying put. Not much to worry about here.

Mountain West Conference

No changes.

Realignment Watch: The most likely scenario for the Mountain West Conference might be to welcome back BYU if or when the school decides to abandon football independence. The conference is not likely to lose any other members unless the Big 12 wants to open up discussions about expansion candidates. That seems unlikely, as the Big 12 might be more interested in more eastern programs to accompany West Virginia if the topic comes up. The Mountain West Conference passed on Idaho and New Mexico State while raiding the WAC, and it does not appear there is any reason to change the stance on those programs at this time for the conference.

Pac-12

No changes.

Realignment Watch: The Pac-12 is a conference that actually has an accurate number in the name, and that should remain the case for the time being. Unless there is a need to increase membership in any split from the NCAA, the Pac-12 should be expected to stick with 12 members. Could the rumors of Texas and Oklahoma kick up some dust? Maybe, but there should be nothing to get too excited about. The same goes for BYU. The Pac-12 probably could have had BYU if it wanted. They took Utah and Colorado instead.

SEC

No changes.

Realignment Watch: The SEC looks pretty solid right now. The additions of texas A&M and Missouri have gone a little more smoothly than perhaps initially expected and the conference is in a very stable place financially with the addition of the SEC Network later this summer. No school will be leaving the SEC, and the options to add that make any sense are not in place, especially if the ACC is on steady ground.

Sun Belt Conference

Adding: Appalachian State, Georgia Southern, Idaho, New Mexico State

Losing: Western Kentucky

The Sun Belt adds two former FCS powers with Appalachian State and Georgia Southern and the conference will take on two schools left deserted by the implosion of the WAC, Idaho and New Mexico State. The conference also loses Western Kentucky and will continue to evaluate potential expansion plans in a search to get an even football membership.

Realignment Watch: The Sun Belt will be most likely to add football schools from the FCS ranks. There are no realistic options sitting in the FBS at this time to add to the Sun Belt, and the future of associate members Idaho and New Mexico State should be watched carefully as well. Like Conference USA, if a domino effect does take place, the Sun Belt could be at risk of losing another member or more (likely to Conference USA).

Coastal Carolina struggling to acquire funding for stadium improvements

COLUMBIA, SC - NOVEMBER 23:  Alex Ross #4 of the Coastal Carolina Chanticleers drops back to pass during their game against the South Carolina Gamecocks at Williams-Brice Stadium on November 23, 2013 in Columbia, South Carolina.  (Photo by Streeter Lecka/Getty Images)
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Coastal Carolina joins the Sun Belt’s football roster in 2017 (every other sport makes the jump this fall), and the Chanticleers would like to make some upgrades to 12-year old Brooks Stadium in advance of their move to college football’s top division.

Only, the school can’t receive approval to acquire the funding necessary to do so.

On Thursday, South Carolina’s Commission on Higher Education rejected by a 9-4 vote the Coastal’s request for $29.9 million to upgrade the stadium. This week’s rejection marked the fourth in three months, as the school has been unable to assuage the CHE’s concerns over how accurately Coastal’s projections forecast the true cost of the project.

The university has dropped its initial request by 21 percent, down from an original $38 million ask.

“We take the responsibility very seriously. This is not an easy decision. We champion everything that you’re about as an institution,” CHE chairman Tim Hofferth said prior to the vote, via Myrtle Beach Online. “ … At the end of the day, I’ve talked to a lot of athletic directors, a lot of presidents throughout the country, to bring it without significant private funding in today’s environment [is risky]. The question is what’s significant? I don’t know. There’s 13 [different] significant answers here. The fact of the matter is it’s very relevant and the thing that I’m afraid of, the costs on the operating side are nowhere near what you anticipate them to be. …

“That’s my greatest concern in this environment. I want to get there. I’m just not there yet.”

The CHE also said it would like to see Coastal raise more private money to fund the project.

“I would ask if it’s within a point of order, can we get some very specific direction as to what is going to be a comfort level for those that are on the commission?” Coastal president Dave DeCenzo said. “You probably can’t do it right now, but I respectfully request that something be given to us because I know there have been some comments at times of ‘Well, why is this new?’ We’ve been playing this ‘Guess what’s on our mind?’ as we get some feedback saying, ‘Well, you’re going to have to lower this, you’re going to have to do that.’ We need some very specific direction.

“Our definition of private money, if that’s unacceptable to you, if your definition of private money is this is a donor writing a check, is it 20 percent, is it 25 percent? Give us some guideline.”

Coastal has stripped down its original blueprint, down from a planned 22,000 capacity to 19,000, while abandoning plans to improve the stadium’s sound system and construct plazas and facades to make the structure more functional.

The NCAA requires FBS programs meet an average attendance of 15,000, which is not currently possible in the 9,214-seat Brooks Stadium.

Coastal Carolina has the opportunity to make a fifth proposal before the CHE next month.

Jay Paterno pens passionate Facebook post defending late father

STATE COLLEGE, PA - JANUARY 26: Jay Paterno, son of Joe Paterno, pauses during his speech during a public memorial for former Penn State Football coach Joe Paterno at the Bryce Jordan Center on the campus of Penn State, January 26, 2012 in State College, Pennsylvania. Paterno, who was 85, died due to complications from lung cancer on January 22, 2012. (Photo by Patrick Smith/Getty Images)
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It’s become crystal clear at this point there is nothing anyone can do, no arranging of words, no stacking of facts, witnesses and testimony, that can change the mind of Joe Paterno‘s supporters. Perhaps a video recording of Paterno admitting he knew of Jerry Sandusky‘s crimes and did nothing to stop them, but maybe not even then.

Leading that pack is the late coach’s family, and chief among them his son and former assistant coach Jay Paterno.

Following new allegations against Penn State uncovered in an insurance suite that came to light on Thursday, the younger Paterno issued a blistering defense of his father. (Hat tip to our own Kevin McGuire for capturing it.)

It’s unclear as of yet how the testimony will affect the insurance suit against Penn State, but one thing that is apparent is the arguing over Paterno’s involvement in the affair and the subsequent affect on his legacy will continue for years to come.

Depositions to begin soon in John Chavis-LSU suit

SEATTLE - SEPTEMBER 5:  Defensive coordinator John Chavis of the LSU Tigers looks on during pre-game warm-up against the Washington Huskies on September 5, 2009 at Husky Stadium in Seattle, Washington. The LSU Tigers defeated the Washington Huskies 31-23. (Photo by Otto Greule Jr/Getty Images)
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LSU got the best of John Chavis on the field in November, but the former Tigers defensive coordinator could gain revenge in the court room.

According to Ross Dellenger of The Advocate, Chavis has turned over phone records from November 2014 through Feb. 13, 2015, the key period in detailing whether Chavis violated his contract agreement with LSU in leaving for a lateral position with Texas A&M. At stake is a $400,000 buyout the school says it is owed.

LSU contends Chavis started working for the Aggies before his contract expired on Jan. 31, 2015, a stance seemingly buoyed by the fact Chavis was photographed in Aggie gear while on recruiting trips with A&M coaches.

Chavis filed a countersuit in Texas alleging the school owes him more than $200,000 in unpaid vacation wages and $400,000 in bonuses. Chavis also accused LSU of altering his contract after he signed it — which the school admitted, though in a “nominal” way.

Should the case go to trial, LSU administrators and coaches could be deposed, which every media member in the country should actively root for. Considering the last such suit led to Charlie Strong forgetting his own quarterback’s name and Texas assistants contradicting each other on the stand during Oklahoma State’s similar suit with its former offensive line coach Joe Wickline, LSU coaches and Chavis hitting the stand could lead to absolute gold.

Ex-Vandy RB Brian Kimbrow now an ex-MTSU RB, too

Brian Kimbrow
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Maybe the third time will be the charm for Brian Kimbrow? Or maybe there’ll be no third time, period?

That appears to be the case Kimbrow confirmed to Rivals.com earlier this week that he has walked away from the Middle Tennessee State football team. Not only that, but the running back has walked away from the sport, period.

“I just didn’t love football like I used to and wanted to focus on school and my forensics career,” Kimbrow told the recruiting website. “Just burned out for real.”

Kimbrow began his collegiate career at Vanderbilt as a four-star recruit in 2012. He ran for 748 yards and six touchdowns his first two seasons with the Commodores before he was indefinitely suspended early on in the 2014 season for conduct detrimental to the team. A month later, the then-junior was dismissed from the Vandy football program.

Kimbrow joined MTSU as a graduate transfer earlier this year and participated in spring practice with his new Blue Raiders teammates.