Cardinal Bird, Charlie Strong

A semi-quick guide to 2014’s college football realignment changes


On Tuesday the latest round of conference realignment musical chairs will begin. If you have lost track of where every school is playing, have no worries because you are surely not alone. In an attempt to keep you updated on all of the changes coming your way this week (Tuesday, July 1 is the official realignment day), here is a rundown of all of the changes taking place and which school is moving where this year. For those planning ahead, there is a look at the potential realignment scene to watch for each conference as well.

American Athletic Conference

Adding: Tulane, Tulsa, East Carolina

Losing: Louisville (ACC), Rutgers (Big Ten)

What was once the Big East is now taking on more of a Conference USA 2.0 feel with the additions of Tulane, Tulsa and East Carolina from Conference USA. The conference will lose Louisville to the ACC and Rutgers to the Big Ten, which hurts the conference’s profile from a competitive standpoint as well as a television marketing standpoint. Navy will be coming aboard as a football-only member starting in 2015, which will give the conference a 12-member football conference and allow for the introduction of a conference championship game.

Realignment Watch: The conference could still be at risk of future changes despite feeling comfortable with the situation now. Cincinnati and Connecticut are two programs that could keep a watchful eye on the lookout for potential landing spots in future conference realignment changes. If the conference does lose any other members, could an invite to Army or UMass be inevitable?


Adding: Louisville

Losing: Maryland (Big Ten)

Maryland, a founding member of the ACC will leave the conference in search of bigger paychecks from the Big Ten. The divorce between Maryland and the ACC has been bitter and those hurt feelings could linger for a while until all exit fees are settled. The ACC likely comes out feeling pretty good about the situation though with the addition of Louisville, a school with a tremendous string of success as an athletics program. The ACC stays at 14 members and continues with the football-scheduling partnership with Notre Dame.

Realignment Watch: With 14 members, the ACC looks to be about as stable as it has been in some time. The grant of rights agreement gives each ACC school more comfort in the changing landscape of collegiate athletics and the future could be bright with the possible addition of an ACC network. Unless there is a need for further expansion due to a Division IV split, the ACC is probably in a good situation.

Big Ten

Adding: Maryland, Rutgers

Losing: None

The Big Ten will increase membership from 12 members to 14 with the second conference expansion in four years (Nebraska joined in 2011). The additions of Maryland and Rutgers do little to add to the football profile of the conference, but the goal of gaining exposure in the eastern TV markets is the strategy at play here. The expansion also means the Big Ten has to reshuffle the divisions, which means no more Leaders and Legends (now that you probably just figured it out, or not). Maryland and Rutgers will join Indiana, Michigan, Michigan State, Ohio State and Penn State in the new east division.

Realignment Watch: The Big Ten may have already been in a stable position after adding Nebraska, but at this point the conference has probably reached as far as it will be able to successfully. The risk of losing any members is likely minimal given the resources and money involved with being a part of the Big Ten. The only possible loss the Big Ten would probably see would be Nebraska making a return to the Big 12, but that does not appear to be something to seriously be concerned about. The Big Ten is not likely to expand any more, so we can probably forget about Texas, Oklahoma or even Notre Dame.

Big 12

No changes.

Realignment Watch: The Big 12 has 10 members, and the conference has made it clear it is perfectly fine with that number. The big question to be answered in the coming year or two is what does the impact of a conference championship game carry in the College Football Playoff. If a conference championship game proves to be a difference-maker, the Big 12 might think about acting quickly on getting back to 12 members. That would be good news for a program like BYU, which the Big 12 has avoided time and time again. Cincinnati? UCF and/or USF? Keep an eye on the Big 12, just in case.

Conference USA

Adding: Western Kentucky

Losing: Tulane, Tulsa, East Carolina (all to AAC)

Conference USA is a conference investing in potential growth with smaller and younger programs. Western Kentucky comes aboard this season to keep the conference’s membership at 14. The conference already added a handful of schools last season after losing UCF, Houston, Memphis and SMU, to the American last season, so not much was needed to fill the holes left by these upcoming changes.

Realignment Watch: Conference USA looks to be a conference that will follow in the domino effect of other conference changes. Unless another conference makes any moves, Conference USA looks to be sitting still on changes. No school will be leaving to join the Sun Belt and the MAC doesn’t look to be a threat for poaching any members, so all eyes should remain on any changes that take place in the American. If the AAC needs to fill some holes in membership, Conference USA could be the target.


No changes, although this will be the final season with UMass as an associate member. The Minutemen will leave the conference after this season and continue to weigh options for the football program’s future.

Realignment Watch: With the upcoming loss of UMass, the MAC will return to a 12-member conference. There is no need for any expansion within the MAC, and the conference seems to be perfectly situated with membership. Unless any school made an attempt to flirt with another conference for any reason (American or Conference USA would be only potential conferences to worry about), the MAC looks to be staying put. Not much to worry about here.

Mountain West Conference

No changes.

Realignment Watch: The most likely scenario for the Mountain West Conference might be to welcome back BYU if or when the school decides to abandon football independence. The conference is not likely to lose any other members unless the Big 12 wants to open up discussions about expansion candidates. That seems unlikely, as the Big 12 might be more interested in more eastern programs to accompany West Virginia if the topic comes up. The Mountain West Conference passed on Idaho and New Mexico State while raiding the WAC, and it does not appear there is any reason to change the stance on those programs at this time for the conference.


No changes.

Realignment Watch: The Pac-12 is a conference that actually has an accurate number in the name, and that should remain the case for the time being. Unless there is a need to increase membership in any split from the NCAA, the Pac-12 should be expected to stick with 12 members. Could the rumors of Texas and Oklahoma kick up some dust? Maybe, but there should be nothing to get too excited about. The same goes for BYU. The Pac-12 probably could have had BYU if it wanted. They took Utah and Colorado instead.


No changes.

Realignment Watch: The SEC looks pretty solid right now. The additions of texas A&M and Missouri have gone a little more smoothly than perhaps initially expected and the conference is in a very stable place financially with the addition of the SEC Network later this summer. No school will be leaving the SEC, and the options to add that make any sense are not in place, especially if the ACC is on steady ground.

Sun Belt Conference

Adding: Appalachian State, Georgia Southern, Idaho, New Mexico State

Losing: Western Kentucky

The Sun Belt adds two former FCS powers with Appalachian State and Georgia Southern and the conference will take on two schools left deserted by the implosion of the WAC, Idaho and New Mexico State. The conference also loses Western Kentucky and will continue to evaluate potential expansion plans in a search to get an even football membership.

Realignment Watch: The Sun Belt will be most likely to add football schools from the FCS ranks. There are no realistic options sitting in the FBS at this time to add to the Sun Belt, and the future of associate members Idaho and New Mexico State should be watched carefully as well. Like Conference USA, if a domino effect does take place, the Sun Belt could be at risk of losing another member or more (likely to Conference USA).

No. 1 Ohio State puts sleeper hold on Maryland’s upset bid

Ezekiel Elliott, Kelon Adams
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Doesn’t it feel like we have seen this all before? No. 1 Ohio State, just as defending national champion Florida State did a year ago, has continued to skate by with some closer-than-expected results without falling victim to a loss. That trend continued Saturday afternoon in Columbus, with the Buckeyes improving to 6-0 and 2-0 in the Big Ten after pulling away from Maryland (2-4, 0-2 Big Ten), 49-28. The Terrapins tied Ohio State at 21-21 in the third quarter, but Cardale Jones completed a 48-yard touchdown pass to Jalin Marshall and J.T. Barrett and Ezekiel Elliot each scored on the ground as the Buckeyes finished on a strong note.

This season may not have gone quite to plan for Ohio State, but the Buckeyes continue to win games and shove aside any concerns along the way. Jones completed 20 passes for 279 yards and a pair of touchdowns without an interception. Elliott went over 100 yards and scored twice. Joey Bosa got a chance to do his usual shrug after a big play (Bosa also avoided getting an ejection for targeting after a mandatory instant replay review). Did Ohio State give up some big plays? Yes, they did. The good news is Ohio State makes plays when they need them the most, and ultimately that is what matters most. Ohio State does not need to blow out its opponents by 20 points on a weekly basis as long as it continues to win games. With four playoff spots up for grabs, Ohio State will secure one if it does not lose a game. The margin for error with a loss is an unknown variable, even as the season reaches its midway point.

Halfway through the season, Urban Meyer seems to have enough reason to stick with Jones and bring an end to that question some still have about the offense. Jones is going to be the quarterback, but Barrett will still get some play as well. Ohio State’s success will be determined by Elliott’s abilty to dominate a game.

Next up for Ohio State will be a home game against Penn State. The Nittany Lions took on a banged-up Indiana team in State College this afternoon. The Hoosiers may have taken Ohio State to the limit last week, but Penn State took advantage of a worn out Indiana team in  26-7 victory. Ohio State demolished Ohio State the last time Penn State visited, 63-14 in 2013, but it was the Nittany Lions that gave Ohio State its biggest scare of the season aside from Virginia Tech last year, with the Buckeyes escaping with an overtime victory on the road.

Maryland will head into a bye week, and it remains unconfirmed whether Edsall will be back to coach Maryland’s next game in two weeks. Reports late this week suggested the school will be moving on from Edsall as head coach, which means Maryland could be going with an interim head coach when Maryland takes on Penn State on October 24 in Baltimore’s M&T Bank Stadium.

Not dead yet! Longhorns make statement in upset over No. 10 Oklahoma

Jerrod Heard
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The demise of the Texas Longhorns has, somewhat, been exaggerated. A college football blueblood largely left for dead put the Big 12 on notice Saturday afternoon in Dallas by upsetting No. 10 Oklahoma in the Red River Rivalry, 24-17. After the game the players hoisted head coach Charlie Strong up as if the team had just won a national championship. You know what? Texas deserved that moment to release some tension with a unified show of joy.

After being flattened last week by TCU, Texas was a program in a big mess with players tweeting at halftime and upperclassmen and underclassmen not seeing eye-to-eye. This was also a good Oklahoma team Texas just defeated. The Sooners climbed to a top 10 ranking after flexing some muscle against West Virginia and showing some good things on offense. None of those good things showed up early enough against the Longhorns though.

Texas held Oklahoma to fewer than 100 yards of total offense in the first half. The Sooners converted just three of their 12 third-down plays, while Texas managed to go 9-of-15 on third downs. For Texas, it was all about getting the running game going to take Oklahoma out of it from the start. D’Onta Foreman led all players with 117 yards and quarterback Jerrod Heard added 115 rushing yards to go with his selectively efficient passing performance (8-of-10 for 53 yards and a touchdown). Johnathan Gray also chipped in with 76 rushing yards. Oklahoma’s Samaje Perine carried the football 10 times for just 36 yards and a touchdown. Considering the production Perine showed last season, this was another disappointing result for the Sooners. Perine has rushed for more than 78 yards in a game just once this season (152 yards vs. Tulsa).

This was the first victory in the rivalry game for Strong, and the second win in three years against the rival Sooners for the Longhorns. This season may still be a huge rebuilding year for Texas, but a win against Oklahoma can help the rebuilding process pick up the pace after starting the season with a 1-4 record. There will still be some difficult games ahead for Strong’s Longhorns (Baylor, Oklahoma State, West Virginia), but everybody in Austin deserves at least one day just to celebrate this win few people saw coming.

Texas looks to make it two wins in a row in two weeks when the Longhorns come off a bye week against Kansas State. Oklahoma will take on Kansas State next week in Manhattan.