Report: Air Force’s football and athletics culture requires a deeper investigation


Disturbing findings within the Air Force athletics culture will lead to a more thorough examination of the program, including the football team. An investigative report by The Gazette found Air Force cadet athletes violated the academy’s honor code by committing sexual assaults, drug use, cheating and more. At the same time, an apparent concern over winning football games and raising more money from alumni donors took preference over taking action against the student-athletes. Superintendent Lt. Gen. Michelle Johnson informed The Gazette the Inspector General has been requested to conduct a deeper investigation of the athletic department.

The biggest part of the report centers around a wild party from 2011, which resulted in the probing of 32 cadets. The party reportedly involved to rampant drug use and alleged date rape drinks leading to sexual intercourse. Half of those questioned (16) about the activities at the party were members of the Air Force football team. Three of the 32 questioned cadets would later be court-martialed, sentenced and discharged, including a pair of football players. Two more football players received administrative punishment and were dismissed. Air Force’s athletic director, Hans Mueh, claimed to not know anything about the 2011 investigation conducted by the Office of Special Investigations until after Air Force played in the 2011 Military Bowl in Washington D.C. (a 42-41 loss to Toledo). The football players involved with the questioning in the investigation played in that bowl game.

Another investigation into activities of football players was later labeled a success by OSI. According to the report, OSI special agent Brandon Enos helped lead Operation Gridiron at the United States Air Force Academy, which identified and removed a total of 18 football players from the program as a result of their involvement in various drug-related use and distribution and sexual assaults.

The damage does not end there for Air Force, at least as far as football is concerned. More details from the investigative report suggest Air Force allowed students to enroll at the academy that did not meet the honor code, many coming after 2008 following the hiring of head coach Troy Calhoun. Calhoun is among the highest paid employee at Air Force. Mueh again falls under scrutiny for allowing standards to be lowered in athletics with regard to the honor code.

There is also the connection to Lt. General Mike Gould, who was in his position during the time of much of the reported misconduct at Air Force. According to the report, Gould emailed instructions to someone tied to a raid on Air Force dorms for suspected drug use demanding a short report lacking enough details to avoid an increased concern to the Pentagon. Why is this rather significant?

And now the College Football Playoff has its first scandal in need of addressing. That is important on a smaller scale though, of course. For now, the concern needs to be placed on the Air Force athletics department. This comes at a time when the actions within the nation’s military has fallen under tighter scrutiny in recent years with issues like hazing and sexual assault. All services and academies continue to face their issues and sometimes ripping off the band-aid is what is needed for sweeping changes to be made.

You can read the entire investigative report for more information and details regarding various concerns within the Air Force athletics community.

Dalvin Cook returns to practice for FSU

TALLAHASSEE, FL - SEPTEMBER 12: Dalvin Cook #4 of the Florida State Seminoles runs the ball against the South Florida Bulls in the second half at Doak Campbell Stadium on September 12, 2015 in Tallahassee, Florida. Florida State defeated South Florida 34-14 as Cook rushed for 266 yards and three touchdowns. (Photo by Joe Robbins/Getty Images)
Getty Images
Leave a comment

With each passing day, it appears Miami won’t be able to avoid one of the most talented and productive running backs in the country.

Thursday, Dalvin Cook returned to practice for the first time this week.  Cook suffered a hamstring injury in the first quarter of Florida State’s win over Wake Forest this past Saturday, and had spent the previous two days of practice riding a bicycle while the rest of his teammates prepped for the in-state and conference rivalry game against The U this Saturday.

The Palm Beach Post wrote that Cook showed “no signs” of the hamstring injury that had some worried about his availability in Week 6.

Head coach Jimbo Fisher, who said Wednesday he doesn’t “ever count Dalvin out” because of his healing ability, will meet with reporters later this evening and could address Cook’s status for the weekend then.  Or, he could play to keep the Hurricanes guessing, even as most assume the All-ACC back will be on the field.

Cook is far and away FSU’s leading rusher, with his 142.5 yards per game good for eight in the country and his six rushing touchdowns tied for 20th.

Gophers down eight starters for game vs. Boilermakers

EVANSTON, IL - OCTOBER 03: at Ryan Field on October 3, 2015 in Evanston, Illinois. Northwestern defeated Minnesota 27-0. (Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images)
Getty Images
1 Comment

It would be an understatement of significant proportions to say that the Minnesota football team is banged up.

How banged up?  On his radio show Thursday, head coach Jerry Kill, the St. Paul Pioneer Press reported, revealed his team will be down a whopping eight starters for Saturday’s game against Purdue.

Kill’s revelation comes one day after he confirmed a total of 20 players donned non-contact jerseys in practice earlier in the day.

The coach didn’t specifically identify which starters would be sidelined, with the Pioneer Press writing “[t]he known injuries to starters include safety Damarius Travis (hamstring), cornerback Briean Boddy-Calhoun (knee), tight end Lincoln Plsek (back) and tackle Ben Lauer (knee/hand).”

One injured starter who will play, Kill confirmed, is quarterback Mitch Leidner. While not detailing any specific injury, Kill said Wednesday that Leidner “hasn’t been healthy. He’s been beat up.”

Overall, though, the Gophers’ health, or lack thereof, is bordering on historic.

“I’ve never seen anything like this in my 32 years in coaching,” Kill said yesterday. “The toughest thing for me right now is all of these kids that work so hard, and when they get hurt, it kills me. … We are running out of people.”

Coming off an 8-5 season last year, the Gophers are struggling. While they stand at 3-2 after five games, the three wins came by a total of nine points over the likes of Colorado State, Kent State and Ohio. Their second loss — the first was by six to TCU in the opener — was a 27-0 shutout at the hands of Northwestern in the Big Ten opener last weekend.