North Carolina Tar Heels

ATLANTA, GA - OCTOBER 24: Josh Sweat #9 of the Florida State Seminoles runs with a first half interception against the Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets at Bobby Dodd Stadium on October 24, 2015 in Atlanta, Georgia. Photo by Scott Cunningham/Getty Images)
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Florida State DE Josh Sweat to miss USF game after surgery to repair meniscus tear

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The hits just keep coming for the Florida State defense.

Head coach Jimbo Fisher announced after Thursday’s practice that starting defensive end Josh Sweat would be out for this week’s game against South Florida and possibly longer after undergoing surgery to repair a torn meniscus.

“He tried to go for a day or two, and it swelled [again],” Fisher said, according to the Orlando Sentinel.“He had a little piece of cartilage in there that they clipped out. It was very clean… He wanted to play with it, and couldn’t do it so we went to clean it out.”

Sweat originally suffered the injury during practice prior to the team’s blowout loss to Louisville last week but did play a role during the game. Junior Jacob Pugh and freshman Brian Burns will take over Sweat’s place on the depth chart until he’s cleared to return.

In addition to missing FSU’s game against in-state rival USF this week, it’s possible the former top recruit and long time starter could be unavailable for ACC clashes with North Carolina and perhaps even Miami over the next two weeks. The Seminoles are already missing the service of safety Derwin James, one of the best defensive players in the country, who also underwent surgery to repair a knee injury.

Fisher told reporters that Sweat’s injury was different from that of James’ and was hopeful that the defensive end could return to action quickly. Either way, Florida State is suddenly much thinner on defense than their head coach had hoped to be after the first month of the season thanks to the latest injury news.

As a result of HB2, ACC yanking football title game from Charlotte

JACKSONVILLE, FL - DECEMBER 1: The Virginia Tech Hokies celebrate a trip to the Orange Bowl after play against the Boston College Eagles in the ACC Championship Game at Jacksonville Municipal Stadium on December 1, 2007 in Jacksonville, Florida.  The Hokies won the title 30 - 16.  (Photo by Al Messerschmidt/Getty Images) *** Local Caption ***
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Well that certainly didn’t take long.

The NCAA announced Monday night that it is pulling seven of its championships from the state of North Carolina because of the controversial House Bill 2 (HB2), a law which some claim fosters discrimination against members of the LGBT communities.  While president Mark Emmert stated that The Association would not push for the ACC to move its football championship game from Charlotte, the conference’s commissioner, John Swofford, heavily intimated that a move could happen.

Wednesday afternoon, that move became official as the ACC announced that  the league “will relocate all neutral site championships for the 2016-17 academic year.”  Included in that number is the football title game, which had been scheduled to be played at Bank of America Stadium through the 2019 season.

The other sports impacted are:

Women’s Soccer
Men’s and Women’s Swimming and Diving
Women’s Basketball
Men’s and Women’s Tennis
Women’s Golf
Men’s Golf
Baseball

This year’s football title game at the site that’s been its home for six years had been scheduled for Dec. 3 at the home of the NFL’s Carolina Panthers.  Tampa (the Buccaneers are on the road that weekend) and Miami (same for Dolphins) have already been mentioned as possibilities for this year’s game.  Orlando would have been an obvious choice, but the Citrus Bowl is hosting a pair of high school football championship games that same day.  Another potential temporary home, Jacksonville, likely won’t be in play this year as the NFL’s Jaguars have a home game the first weekend of December.

FedEx Field in Landover, Maryland, could be a consideration as well as the Redskins play away from their home.  The NFL stadium has played host to a number of college football games the past few years, although whether the weather that time of year would be a concern to the ACC remains to be seen.

Charlotte has played host to the ACC football championship game since 2010. Prior to 2010, the first three were played in Jacksonville and the next two in Tampa.

Below are the statements on the relocation by league officials.

Statement from the ACC Council of Presidents:
“As members of the Atlantic Coast Conference, the ACC Council of Presidents reaffirmed our collective commitment to uphold the values of equality, diversity, inclusion and non-discrimination. Every one of our 15 universities is strongly committed to these values and therefore, we will continue to host ACC Championships at campus sites. We believe North Carolina House Bill 2 is inconsistent with these values, and as a result, we will relocate all neutral site championships for the 2016-17 academic year. All locations will be announced in the future from the conference office.”

Statement from Clemson University President James P. Clements, chair of the ACC Council of Presidents:
“The ACC presidents engaged in a constructive, wide-ranging and vigorous discussion of this complex issue over the past two days. The decision to move the neutral site championships out of North Carolina while HB 2 remains the law was not an easy one but it is consistent with the shared values of inclusion and non-discrimination at all of our institutions.”

Statement from ACC Commissioner John Swofford:
“The ACC Council of Presidents made it clear that the core values of this league are of the utmost importance, and the opposition to any form of discrimination is paramount. Today’s decision is one of principle, and while this decision is the right one, we recognize there will be individuals and communities that are supportive of our values as well as our championship sites that will be negatively affected. Hopefully, there will be opportunities beyond 2016-17 for North Carolina neutral sites to be awarded championships.

 

North Carolina indefinitely suspends LB accused of rape

CHAPEL HILL, NC - NOVEMBER 14:  Head coach Larry Fedora of the North Carolina Tar Heels directs his team during their game against the Miami Hurricanes at Kenan Stadium on November 14, 2015 in Chapel Hill, North Carolina.  (Photo by Grant Halverson/Getty Images)
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North Carolina has indefinitely suspended one of its football players who has been accused of raping a UNC student this past Valentine’s Day, the school confirmed late Tuesday night.

A UNC student, sophomore Delaney Robinson, alleged in both a statement and press conference Tuesday that she was raped by a current Tar Heel seven months ago. That player was subsequently identified as Allen Artis, who has been indefinitely suspended by the university.

The suspension came shortly after charges of sexual battery and assault had been filed against Artis. Robinson pursued the filing of misdemeanor charges after prosecutors had determined that felony charges weren’t warranted.

A warrant has been issued for Artis’ arrest on the misdemeanor charges, although he’s yet to turn himself in.

Robinson and her lawyer have accused the university as well as prosecutors of dragging their collective feet on her allegations, which is why they have gone public with her explosive claims.

According to Robinson, she reported the alleged rape to university police as well as the university’s Title IX office. Additionally, she went to a local hospital after the alleged rape, where evidence was collected in a rape kit. Robinson’s father said his daughter, who has acknowledged drinking that night, immediately reported the alleged sexual assault.

“We are aware of the misdemeanor charges against Allen Artis,” a statement from head coach Larry Fedora began. “I cannot comment on either the allegation or the investigative process. We take these matters very seriously and are fully cooperating with the appropriate authorities.”

The past two seasons, Artis played in 25 games for the Tar Heels.  He had played in both games to start the 2016 season.

UNC student accuses current Tar Heel football player of Valentine’s Day rape

CHAPEL HILL, NC - OCTOBER 9:  A view of two North Carolina Tar Heels helmets during the game against the North Carolina State Wolfpack on October 9, 2004 at Kenan Stadium Stadium in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. North Carolina defeated North Carolina State 30-24. (Photo By Grant Halverson/Getty Images)
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An ugly and disturbing situation is developing in Chapel Hill.

North Carolina student Delaney Robinson claimed in both a statement and press conference held after the release of a statement that she was raped by a current Tar Heels football player  Valentine’s Day earlier this year.  It was subsequently reported that player is junior linebacker Allen Artis.

According to Robinson, she reported the alleged rape to university police as well as the university’s Title IX office.  Additionally, she went to a local hospital after the alleged rape, where evidence was collected in a rape kit.  Robinson’s father said his daughter, who has acknowledged drinking that night, immediately reported the alleged sexual assault.

Robinson and her lawyer are accusing the university as well as prosecutors of dragging their collective feet on her allegations, which is why they have gone public with her explosive claims.

“For more than six months we have asked the University and the Orange County District Attorney’s office to hold Delaney’s rapist accountable for his actions,” Robinson’s attorney, Denise W. Branch, said in a statement. “At every turn we have been met with discouragement and delay.”

Orange County DA Jim Woodall told ABC11‘s website Tuesday that the case was “investigated thoroughly.”  Artis has not been charged, nor has any punishment, at least publicly, been meted out by the football program or school.

UNC athletic director Bubba Cunningham told the Raleigh News & Observer‘s Andrew Carter “in a text that athletic department is not involved in ‘university processes.” regarding sexual assault cases.”

These allegations are the latest sexual assault complaints that have the university bracing for additional federal backlash.  From the News & Observer:

UNC faces a pending federal complaint by former students and a former administrator who said the university mishandled sexual assault cases and the reporting of sex crimes.

Below is the complete text of Robinson’s initial statement:

When I entered Carolina as a freshman a little over a year ago, I was excited about new experiences, new friends, great faculty and classes. That all changed in February when I was assaulted and raped on campus.

I did not realize that rather than receiving support and concern from the University, I would only be further victimized by the people who should be working to keep us safe.

Yes, I was drinking that night on Valentine’s Day. I’m under age, and I take responsibility for that. But that doesn’t give anyone the right to violate me. I did not deserve to be raped.

My life has changed forever, while the person who assaulted me continues as a student and a football player on this campus.

After I was raped, I went to the hospital and gave an account of what I could remember to the sexual assault nurse. Then I was again quizzed by the DPS investigators, who consistently asked humiliating and accusatory questions. What was I wearing? What was I drinking? How much did I drink? How much did I eat that day? Did I lead him on? Have I hooked up with him before? Do I often have one night stands? Did I even say no? What is my sexual history? How many men have I slept with? I was treated like a suspect.

My humiliation turned to anger when I listened to the recorded interviews of my rapist by DPS. Rather than accusing him of anything, the investigators spoke to him with a tone of [sic] comradery. They provided reassurances to him when he became upset. They even laughed with him when he told them how many girls’ phone numbers he had managed to get on the same night he raped me. They told him, “don’t sweat it, just keep on living your life and playing football.”

This man raped me and the police told him not to sweat it. How can this happen? Where’s the protection for students? Why does the University not care that this rapist is free and could possibly harm another student?

And if this happened to me, who else has been hurt and been too scared to come forward? And what other cases are being swept under the rug by the University?

I did everything a rape victim is supposed to do. I reported it. I allowed the rape kit to be taken. I gave a statement. I cooperated with law enforcement and the Title IX office. But six months later the University has done nothing.

I’m taking this public stand not for me, but for the other students on campus who are not protected, despite what the University tells us. I love this University. It’s my home. I plan on graduating. But I expect the University to fulfill its promises to me and to all students.

NCAA won’t push ACC to move football title game from Charlotte

NCAA Men's Final Four - Practice
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Charlotte may end up losing the ACC championship game, but it won’t be at the behest of the NCAA.

The NCAA announced Monday night that it is pulling seven of its championships from the state of North Carolina because of the controversial House Bill 2 (HB2), a law which some claim fosters discrimination against members of the LGBT communities.  The highest-profile events to be moved out of the state are the men’s basketball first- and second-round games that had been scheduled to be played next March in Greensboro.

When it comes to comes to the ACC’s football championship game held annually in Charlotte, that will be left up to the conference’s discretion.

Based on a strongly-worded statement from the league’s commissioner last night, however, the title game might not be long for the North Carolina city as long as HB2 remains in effect.

“The decision by the NCAA Board of Governors to relocate all current, and not award any future, NCAA Championship sites in the state of North Carolina continues to build upon the negative impact this bill has already had on the state,” John Swofford’s statement began. “HB2 was previously scheduled to be thoroughly discussed at this week’s ACC Council of Presidents meeting, so it would be premature to make any decisions or announcements regarding ACC Championships until our membership is able to discuss. The league’s longstanding commitment to equality, diversity and inclusion will continue to be a central theme to our discussions.

“On a personal note, it’s time for this bill to be repealed as it’s counter to basic human rights.”

Charlotte has played host to the ACC football championship game since 2010, and is contractually tied to the conference through the 2019 season. Prior to 2010, the first three were played in Jacksonville and the next two in Tampa.

Orlando and Atlanta were also considered as options to host the title game.