Iowa State Cyclones

WACO, TX - NOVEMBER 19:  The Baylor Bears take the field before a game against the Kansas State Wildcats at McLane Stadium on November 19, 2016 in Waco, Texas.  (Photo by Ronald Martinez/Getty Images)
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Big 12 to withhold 25 percent of Baylor’s revenue ‘pending third-party verification of changes’

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Baylor’s conference is laying down what could prove to be a very significant financial hammer on the university.  Or a means to change. One of the two.

The Big 12 announced Wednesday that it withhold 25 percent of future revenue payments to BU, only releasing the monies “pending the outcome of third-party verification review of required changes to Baylor’s athletics procedures and to institutional governance of its intercollegiate athletics programs, among other matters.” According to the conference’s release, its board of directors voted unanimously on the measure.

Baylor itself didn’t have a vote in the matter.

“The Board is unified in establishing a process to verify that proper institutional controls are in place and sustainable,” said Oklahoma president and Big 12 board chairman David Boren in a statement. “Effective immediately, the Conference is withholding 25 percent of Baylor’s share of any future revenue distribution until the proper execution of controls is independently verified. By taking these actions the Board desires to ensure that the changes that were promised are actually made and that systems are in place to avoid future problems. The proportional withholding of revenue distribution payments will be in effect until the Board has determined that Baylor is in compliance with Conference bylaws and regulations as well as all components of Title IX.”

The action is in direct response to the sexual assault scandal that enveloped the school last year and resulted in the head football coach, athletic director and president losing their jobs.

On its surface, the measure could cost the university’s athletic department upwards of $8 million annually if the revenue that’s being held doesn’t ultimately find its way to the school. The reality, though, is this is appears to merely be a way for the conference to push one of its members toward enacting changes that are wholly necessary.

In that vein, the university’s acting president, David E. Garland, released a statement shortly after the Big 12’s announcement, highlighting the actions the school has taken in the wake of the scandal.

Upon learning the scope and scale of the troubling incidents that occurred within our campus community through an independent investigation, Baylor University took unprecedented corrective actions that led to leadership changes within the University administration and athletic department and 105 recommendations to strengthen the safety and security of our students. No other university in the country has responded as aggressively and decisively as Baylor regarding incidents of sexual assaults on its campus.

“Under the University’s new leadership, Baylor has demonstrated a firm commitment to athletics compliance and integrity, increased awareness and prevention of sexual assault, implementation of Title IX best practices and providing comprehensive support services for any student in need of them. Baylor already had planned to hire an outside auditor to audit the implementation of our enhanced practices, and we welcome the Big 12 Conference’s request of an independent review. While the withholding of conference distributions is an unexpected financial event, we do not deem these actions to materially impact the overall financial position of the University. We pledge our full cooperation, and we will work with the Big 12 Conference to conduct the audit as expeditiously as possible.

“This third-party review at the request of the Big 12 Conference will provide an opportunity for us to demonstrate our progress to date and our ongoing commitment in establishing Baylor as a leading institution in athletics compliance and governance and for preventing and addressing sexual assaults on college campuses.

Big 12 records worst signing day in conference history

FORT WORTH, TX - OCTOBER 25:  The Big XII logo on a pylon at Amon G. Carter Stadium on October 25, 2014 in Fort Worth, Texas.  (Photo by Ronald Martinez/Getty Images)
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Okay, it’s hard to prove the premise of the article precisely correct considering recruiting information wasn’t readily available (and archived) when the league founded in the mid 1990’s. But, still, it’s hard to imagine the Big 12 having a worse Signing Day than this. Or any major conference, for that matter.

The conference signed only four of the nation’s top 100 players as ranked by the 247Sports Composite rankings — No. 76-ranked guard Jack Anderson (Texas Tech), No. 79-ranked defensive back Justin Broiles (Oklahoma), No. 91-ranked wide receiver Jalen Reagor (TCU) and No. 97-ranked defensive back Robert Barnes (Oklahoma).

By comparison, Alabama signed five of the nation’s top 26 players and Ohio State inked five of the top 24.

The bloodletting started in Texas, the “home” recruiting area to over half the league and the main talent base for the conference. Anderson was the only Texan among 247‘s top dozen players, and only six of the state’s top 20 players elected to stay in the Big 12.

On the team front, Oklahoma pulled its weight, ranking No. 8 in the national ranking. But the next Big 12 team was Texas, all the way down at No. 26. TCU followed at No. 30, with Oklahoma State at No. 38 and Baylor at No. 39.

There are a number of factors for this, of course. Texas has been down for seven years running and just endured a coaching change. Baylor had a bomb go off in its football facility, essentially. But TCU and Oklahoma State are recruiting about as well as one could expect given their respective limitations, and that’s become a theme for this conference in the post-realignment area. The Big 12 is limited not only in total number, but in the number of marquee programs.

It’s also limited in the areas in which it can reliably pull players from. The Lone Star State is open for business now to suitors far and wide, obviously. Oklahoma, Kansas, Iowa and West Virginia offer next to nothing in terms of recruiting. Beyond that, Big 12 teams have to convince California players to leave the coast or kids from the Deep South to bypass the SEC.

That process isn’t going well, obviously, at least among the top-rated players. And until that changes, the chicken-egg scenario of the only conference to miss the College Football Playoff two times in three years will also be the only conference to place one team in the recruiting top 25.

Tom Herman’s return to Ames moved as Texas at Iowa State game shifted to Thursday night

HOUSTON, TX - SEPTEMBER 10: Houston Cougars head coach Tom Herman participates in the Cougar walk before playing against the Lamar Cardinals at TDECU Stadium on September 10, 2016 in Houston, Texas.  (Photo by Thomas B. Shea/Getty Images)
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The Pac-12 and ACC recently released their conference schedules and while the Big 12 did so quite some time ago, the league just announced a shift in one game’s timing for what is likely television purposes.

The Texas at Iowa State contest has been moved from Saturday, September 30th to Thursday, September 28th. The game serves as the conference opener for both teams and will come right after the two programs’ bye weeks.

Interestingly, the Longhorns’ release on the game notes that this will be just the seventh weekday game the school has played since 1963 aside from their typical Thanksgiving dates (most of which involved former rival Texas A&M on turkey day itself).

This will also mark the Big 12 debut for new Texas coach Tom Herman, who perhaps not coincidentally used to coach the Cyclones as offensive coordinator from 2009–2011. While the league may look a little different than it did when he was coaching in Ames, at least the conference schedule makers are letting him start his new tenure in Austin at a familiar place.

Michigan OL David Dawson announces transfer to Iowa State

AMES, IA - Quarterback Joel Lanning #7 of the Iowa State Cyclones high fives head coach Matt Campbell of the Iowa State Cyclones after scoring a touchdown in the first half of play against the Baylor Bears at Jack Trice Stadium on October 1, 2016 in Ames, Iowa. (Photo by David Purdy/Getty Images)
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Michigan offensive lineman David Dawson announced shortly after the Wolverines’ Orange Bowl loss to Florida State he would seek a home elsewhere, and now he has found that home.

Dawson announced Sunday through his Twitter account he will undergo a graduate transfer to Iowa State for the 2017 season.

“I would like to thank God for granting me another opportunity to play the game that I love and also allowing me to meet such a great staff and team at Iowa State!,” he wrote. “I’m proud to announce that I will finish my college career in Ames, IA.”

Dawson was a career reserve in Ann Arbor, logging 12 career games in maize and blue, according to MLive.

The Cyclones can use all the help they can get, though. Iowa State finished 80th nationally in yards per carry and tied for 97th in sacks allowed in 2016, and lose four offensive line starters to graduation.

Former Iowa State K Cole Netten makes highlight reel of tweets from his haters

AMES, IA ? OCTOBER 11: Place kicker Cole Netten #1 of the Iowa State Cyclones celebrates with teammate offensive lineman Wendell Taiese #78 after kicking a field goal in the first half of play against the Toldeo Rockets at Jack Trice Stadium on October 11, 2014 in Ames, Iowa. (Photo by David Purdy/Getty Images)
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Coaches and players often say the, uh, free expression of today’s social media age is one of the hardest things about participating in college football. Not only can anyone who watches a game critique every thing you do, they can let you know they’re critiquing everything you do.

Former Iowa State kicker Cole Netten received his share of negative tweets but he, as the kids say, is letting his haters be his motivators. Netten produced an 81-second video of negative tweets and stories he’s received over the course of his career.

Netten, by the way, concluded his college career by finishing third in college football after knocking in 16-of-17 field goal attempts and 35-of-37 extra point attempts. He was named to the Associated Press’s All-Big 12 first team.