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Iowa State lineman who transferred in from Michigan retires from football

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And now we know a little more of the rest of the story.

Monday, David Dawson along with his head coach, Matt Campbell, indicated that the offensive lineman was no longer a part of the Iowa State football team.  The surprising move came five months after Dawson came to ISU as a graduate transfer from Michigan.

In a text message from Campbell to the Des Moines Register, the coach revealed that Dawson had decided to retire from the sport of football altogether.  Campbell stated “[f]amily reasons played heavy into his retirement,” although he declined to elaborate on the specifics.

As a grad transfer, Dawson would’ve been eligible to play immediately for the Cyclones in 2017.

A four-star 2013 signee, Dawson was rated as the No. 4 guard in the country; the No. 2 player at any position in the state of Michigan; and the No. 95 player overall on 247Sports.com’s composite board.  That stellar recruiting pedigree didn’t transfer to on-field success as Dawson played in just 12 games during his four seasons with the Wolverines.

That said, he was expected to be a significant contributor to the Cyclones’ line this season in what would’ve been his final year of eligibility.

Offensive lineman who transferred from Michigan to Iowa State in January leaves ISU in June

Iowa State coach Matt Campbell
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Never mind, I guess?

In January of this year, David Dawson announced that he would be transferring from Michigan to Iowa State.  Five months later, a tweet from Dawson’s Twitter account that featured a backpack emoji preceded a confirmation to the Des Moines Register from the football program that the offensive lineman is no longer a part of the team.

In a text to the Register, head coach Matt Campbell stated that it’s “[b]etter it happens now than during the season.” The coach also indicated that the decision has been a couple of weeks in the making.

As a graduate transfer, Dawson would’ve been eligible to play immediately for the Cyclones in 2017.  The reason behind this latest departure and what his future plans are when it comes to football are decidedly unknown at this time.

A four-star 2013 signee, Dawson was rated as the No. 4 guard in the country; the No. 2 player at any position in the state of Michigan; and the No. 95 player overall on 247Sports.com’s composite board.  That stellar recruiting pedigree didn’t transfer to on-field success as Dawson played in just 12 games during his four seasons with the Wolverines.

Big 12 to distribute nearly $35 million in revenue per school

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While the perception is that the Big 12 is lagging behind on the field, the conference and its membership is doing just fine at the bank, thank you very much.

Friday afternoon, commissioner Bob Bowlsby announced that nine of the 10 schools in the conference will each receive a revenue payout of $34.8 million.  And what of the 10th?  In early February of this year, the Big 12 announced that it will withhold 25 percent of future revenue payments to Baylor, only releasing the monies to the scandal-plagued university “pending the outcome of third-party verification review of required changes to Baylor’s athletics procedures and to institutional governance of its intercollegiate athletics programs, among other matters.”

Thus far, Bowlsby said, that total is in the neighborhood of $6 million.

As for the other members, the windfall represents a 15-percent increase from a year ago.  In 2016, each school received in the neighborhood of $30.4 million, which was a 20-percent increase from 2015.

When Tier Three revenue is taken into account, Texas will pull in nearly $50 million in revenue while Red River rival Oklahoma’s number is around $42 million.

Report: Big 12 still raking in SEC-level cash

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It’s a bad time for the Big 12. The conference isn’t signing blue chip prospects at the rate of its peers, isn’t producing draft picks at the rate of its peers and isn’t reaching and winning big games at the rate of its peers.

But the Big 12 is still getting paid at the rate of its peers.

The league’s contracts with ESPN and FOX combined with its 10-team set up have allowed the Big 12 to keep pace with the SEC and Big Ten and remain ahead of the ACC and Pac-12 in financial distribution. The Dallas Morning News‘s Big 12 writer Chuck Carlton tweeted on Friday the league’s per-school distribution will again grow 10 percent to more than $33 million in 2017-18.

The SEC distributed just north of $40 million in 2016-17, while the Big Ten was at $33 million by 2014-15.

However, since the Big 12 does not have its own television network, its conference distributions do not include third-tier rights, which its schools keep and sell on their own — like the Longhorn Network. So schools like Texas, Oklahoma and Kansas are likely getting paid equal or above their SEC and Big Ten peers.

Now if only they could start recruiting and winning like them, too.

Rimington watch list details list of returning centers

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It’s the dead time of the college football calendar, which means it’s time for this sport’s oldest, most antiquated tradition: watch lists.

First one in line is the Rimington Trophy, given to the best center in college football. And to help voters narrow down their choice for when voting picks up six months from now, the Rimington has helpfully provided this watch list of essentially every returning starting center in college football.

The 2017 list includes (deep breath):

– Aaron Mitchell, Fresno State
– Alan Knott, South Carolina
– Alac Eberle, Florida State
– Antonyo Woods, Florida Atlantic
– Asotui Eli, Hawaii
– Austin Doan, Central Michigan
– Austin Golson, Auburn
– Austin Schlottmann, TCU
– Billy Price, Ohio State
– Blaise Fountain, New Mexico
– Brad Lundblade, Oklahoma State
– Brad North, Northwestern
– Bradley Bozeman, Alabama
– Brendan Moore, Maryland
– Brian Allen, Michigan State
– Bryce Holland, Army
– Cameron Ruff, South Florida
– Chandler Miller, Tulsa
– Coleman Shelton, Washington
– Colton Prater, Texas A&M
– Danny Godloveske, Miami (Ohio)
– Dennis Edwards, Western Kentucky
– Drew Keyser, Memphis
– Erick Wren, Oklahoma
– Evan Brown, SMU
– Frank Ragnow, Arkansas
– Gabe Mobley, Georgia State
– Garrett McGhin, East Carolina
– Jake Bennett, Colorado State
– Jake Hanson, Oregon
– Jake Pruehs, Ohio
– James Daniels, Iowa
– James O’Hagan, Buffalo
– Jesse Burkett, Stanford
– John Keenoy, Western Michigan
– Jon Baker, Boston College
– Julian Good-Jones, Iowa State
– Keoni Taylor, San Jose State
– LaVonne Gauthney, Akron
– Levi Brown, Marshall
– Luke Shively, Northern Illinois
– Mason Hampton, Boise State
– Matt Hennessy, Temple
– Mesa Ribordy, Kansas
– Michael Deiter, Wisconsin
– Nathan Puthoff, Kent State
– Nick Allegretti, Illinois
– Nick Clarke, Old Dominion
– Reid Najvar, Kansas State
– Ryan Anderson, Wake Forest
– Sam Mustipher, Notre Dame
– Scott Quessenberry, UCLA
– Sean Krepsz, Nevada
– Sean Rawlings, Ole Miss
– Sumner Houston, Oregon State
– T.J. McCoy, Florida
– Tanner Thrift, Baylor
– Tejan Koroma, BYU
– Tim McAullife, Bowling Green
– Trey Martin, Rice
– Will Clapp, LSU
– Will Noble, Houston
– Zach Shackelford, Texas

Exhale.

Got all that?

Ohio State’s Pat Elflein claimed the honor last season.