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Ex-K-State WR involved in release imbroglio transfers to Appalachian State

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After public pressure helped get him out of the Little Apple, Corey Sutton is going to resume his collegiate playing career on the East Coast.

On his personal Twitter account Friday night, Sutton (pictured, No. 12) announced that he is “[b]lessed to say I will be continuing my collegiate career at Appalachian State University.” The rising sophomore will have to sit out the 2017 season because of arcane and one-sided NCAA transfer rules.

Beginning in 2018, he’ll have three seasons of eligibility remaining.

The move comes three weeks or so after a very noisy exit from his first college football home.

In early June, the transferring wide receiver revealed in an interview that Kansas State had denied a release to all 35 schools he requested, including FCS and Div. II programs.  Bill Snyder both confirmed the accuracy of Sutton’s accounting of events and defended his decision, then inexplicably ratcheted up the public rhetoric by revealing Sutton had failed a pair of drug tests.

Facing a maelstrom of criticism, Snyder subsequently apologized publicly while the football program granted Sutton a “full release” from his scholarship that still restricted him from transferring to any Big 12 school or one that’s on K-State’s future schedule while he still has eligibility. It’s unclear if the Sun Belt Mountaineers were on Sutton’s original list of 35 schools that was denied by the university.

In his lone season with the Wildcats, Sutton played in 11 games, catching four passes for 54 yards. Sutton came to K-State as a three-star 2016 signee after playing his high school football in North Carolina.

K-State grants WR Corey Sutton full release from scholarship, Bill Snyder apologizes

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Finally, some sanity has made an appearance in the Little Apple.

Corey Sutton (pictured, No. 12) kicked up quite the spitstorm earlier this week when, during an interview, the transferring wide receiver revealed that Kansas State had denied a release to all 35 schools he requested, including FCS and Div. II programs.  Bill Snyder both confirmed the accuracy of Sutton’s accounting of events and defended his decision, then inexplicably ratcheted up the public rhetoric by revealing Sutton had failed a pair of drug tests.

Friday, in a belated attempt to cram the toothpaste back in the tube, K-State announced that Sutton has been granted a full release from his scholarship and is, per the school, “permitted to transfer and be eligible at any of the institutions to which he requested.” While the university used the term “full release,” Sutton will still not be permitted to transfer to any Big 12 school or one that’s on K-State’s future schedule while he still has eligibility.

“After having further dialogue with Coach Snyder and the Sutton family, we believe that it is in everyone’s best interest to grant Corey his full release,” athletic director Gene Taylor said in a statement. “We wish Corey the best as he continues his athletic and academic career.”

The player also received a public apology from his now-former head coach.

“I would like to apologize to Corey and his family for my remarks last night which included sensitive and private information,” Snyder aid in his statement. “I spoke out of line and for that I express a sincere regret for my comments.”

In his lone season with the Wildcats, Sutton played in 11 games, catching four passes for 54 yards.  Sutton came to Manhattan as a three-star 2016 signee.

The identities of the 35 schools to which Sutton requested a transfer haven’t been revealed.

Big 12 to distribute nearly $35 million in revenue per school

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While the perception is that the Big 12 is lagging behind on the field, the conference and its membership is doing just fine at the bank, thank you very much.

Friday afternoon, commissioner Bob Bowlsby announced that nine of the 10 schools in the conference will each receive a revenue payout of $34.8 million.  And what of the 10th?  In early February of this year, the Big 12 announced that it will withhold 25 percent of future revenue payments to Baylor, only releasing the monies to the scandal-plagued university “pending the outcome of third-party verification review of required changes to Baylor’s athletics procedures and to institutional governance of its intercollegiate athletics programs, among other matters.”

Thus far, Bowlsby said, that total is in the neighborhood of $6 million.

As for the other members, the windfall represents a 15-percent increase from a year ago.  In 2016, each school received in the neighborhood of $30.4 million, which was a 20-percent increase from 2015.

When Tier Three revenue is taken into account, Texas will pull in nearly $50 million in revenue while Red River rival Oklahoma’s number is around $42 million.

Bill Snyder publicly talks about transferring K-State WR failing two drug tests

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The Kansas State football program under Bill Snyder has officially gone off the rails and is careening toward an unseemly end for an otherwise classy head coach.

Earlier this week, Corey Sutton, who decided in early May to transfer from K-State, revealed in an interview that the athletic department in general and Snyder specifically had banned him from transferring to any of the 35 schools on a list he had submitted.  After filing an appeal, the university upheld the initial banning.

A day later, the Wildcats head coach essentially confirmed Sutton’s side of the story with some convoluted logic in a radio interview.  Later that day, the head coach added to the burgeoning controversy by publicly revealing that the wide receiver had twice failed drug tests ahead of his transfer.

“He’s a young man who’s been in trouble twice, tested positive twice,” the 77-year-old coach said. “Ya know, I’ve never kept a player in our program who’s tested positive two times… drug tested, but we have some rules in the athletic department that allowed that to happen this time.”

Unacceptable and appalling.

It’s wholly unacceptable that, for whatever reason, Snyder is petty enough to deny a transfer to nearly three dozen football programs — some of whom compete at the FCS and Div. II level, and none of whom are members of the Big 12 or on K-State’s schedule this season.

It’s utterly appalling that Snyder inexplicably decided to publicly air such private information.

It’s also confusing and baffling as to why Snyder would want a player who (allegedly) twice tested dirty to remain on his football team. What’s Snyder’s end-game with this tack? Sully a player’s reputation so that he’s not welcome elsewhere, or sully it so that he’s not welcome in his own program?

Regardless of how this situation ultimately plays out, Snyder’s legacy has been irreversibly tainted. And that’s just sad, on multiple levels.

Bill Snyder confirms, defends decision to limit transferring WR’s options

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Corey Sutton wants to transfer from Kansas State, but he says his head coach Bill Snyder is making that significantly more difficult for him.

Snyder’s response? “Yeah, pretty much.”

Snyder appeared on WHB-AM radio in Kansas City (via Yahoo) to defend his move to limit Sutton’s transfer by stating, essentially, that he doesn’t believe in transferring.

“It’s my commitment that once we have signed the youngster, that we’re committed to him as long as he behaves himself. I accept a youngster that comes into our program as making a similar commitment with a handshake and obviously a signed piece of paper. I’ve always said a youngster is free to leave, but I’m not going to release the youngster.

“It doesn’t mean he can’t go someplace else and play, he can certainly do that. He wouldn’t be on athletic scholarship for a year’s period of time, but could still go and play and then go on scholarship after that. That’s a choice they have to make. I’ve told the young man, and have told him all along, we’d love for him to stay in the program. Anyways, at the end of the day, that’s always been my policy, as I said. There’s a lot of things being said out there, some of them that I’m not even aware of.”

It’s a bit hypocritical — okay, it’s more than a bit hypocritical — that Snyder limits players from transferring while freely hiring coaches who are under contract elsewhere.

But, still, Snyder has the power to limit Sutton’s transfer and he’s standing behind his decision to do just that.