TCU Horned Frogs

LOUISVILLE, KY - SEPTEMBER 17: Lamar Jackson #8 of the Louisville Cardinals runs with the ball during the game against the Florida State Seminoles at Papa John's Cardinal Stadium on September 17, 2016 in Louisville, Kentucky. (Photo by Bobby Ellis/Getty Images)
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Behold: The full 2016-17 college football bowl schedule is here

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The College Football Playoff and New Year’s Six lineups are set, but there’s much more to bowl season than the top line games. Running 40 games deep and stretching from Dec. 17 to Jan. 9, the 2016-17 bowl schedule came together Sunday afternoon, which we’ve compiled here for your viewing enjoyment.

Let’s dive right in.

Saturday, Dec. 17
Gildan New Mexico Bowl (2 p.m. ET, ESPN): UTSA vs. New Mexico
Las Vegas Bowl presented by Geico (3:30 p.m. ET, ABC): Houston vs. San Diego State
Raycom Media Camelia Bowl (5:30 p.m. ET, ESPN): Appalachian State vs. Toledo
AutoNation Cure Bowl (5:30 p.m. ET, CBS Sports Network): Central Florida vs. Arkansas State
R+L Carriers New Orleans Bowl (9 p.m. ET, ESPN): Lousiana-Lafayette vs. Southern Miss

Monday, Dec. 19
Miami Beach Bowl (2:30 p.m. ET, ESPN): Central Michigan vs. Tulsa

Tuesday, Dec. 20
Boca Raton Bowl (7 p.m. ET, ESPN): Memphis vs. Western Kentucky

Wednesday, Dec. 21
San Diego County Credit Union Poinsettia Bowl (9 p.m. ET, ESPN): BYU vs. Wyoming

Thursday, Dec. 22
Famous Idaho Potato Bowl (7 p.m. ET, ESPN): Idaho vs. Colorado State

Friday, Dec. 23
Popeyes Bahamas Bowl (1 p.m. ET, ESPN): Old Dominion vs. Eastern Michigan
Lockheed Martin Armed Forces Bowl (4:30 p.m. ET, ESPN): Louisiana Tech vs. No. 25 Navy
Dollar General Bowl (8 p.m. ET, ESPN): Ohio vs. Troy

Saturday, Dec. 24
Hawai’i Bowl (8 p.m. ET, ESPN): Hawaii vs. Middle Tennessee

Monday, Dec. 26
St. Petersburg Bowl (11 a.m. ET, ESPN): Mississippi State vs. Miami (Ohio)
Quick Lane Bowl (2:30 p.m. ET, ESPN): Boston College vs. Maryland
Camping World Independence Bowl (5 p.m. ET, ESPN2): NC State vs. Vanderbilt

Tuesday, Dec. 27
Zaxby’s Heart of Dallas Bowl (noon ET, ESPN): Army vs. North Texas
Military Bowl presented by Northrop Grumman (3:30 p.m. ET, ESPN): No. 24 Temple vs. Wake Forest
National Funding Holiday Bowl (7 p.m. ET, ESPN): Washington State vs. Minnesota
Motel 6 Cactus Bowl (10:15 p.m. ET, ESPN): Boise State vs. Baylor

Wednesday, Dec. 28
New Era Pinstripe Bowl (2 p.m. ET, ESPN): No. 23 Pittsburgh vs. Northwestern
Russell Athletic Bowl (5:30 p.m. ET, ESPN): No. 16 West Virginia vs. Miami
Foster Farms Bowl (8:30 p.m. ET, FOX): Indiana vs. No. 19 Utah
AdvoCare V100 Texas Bowl (9 p.m. ET, ESPN): Texas A&M vs. Kansas State

Thursday, Dec. 29
Birmingham Bowl (2 p.m. ET, ESPN): South Florida vs. South Carolina
Belk Bowl (5:30 p.m. ET, ESPN): Arkansas vs. No. 22 Virginia Tech
Valero Alamo Bowl (9 p.m. ET, ESPN): No. 10 Colorado vs. No. 12 Oklahoma State

Friday, Dec. 30
AutoZone Liberty Bowl (noon ET, ESPN): TCU vs. Georgia
Hyundai Sun Bowl (2 p.m. ET, CBS): No. 18 Stanford vs. North Carolina
Franklin American Mortgage Music City Bowl (3:30 p.m. ET, ESPN): No. 21 Tennessee vs. Nebraska
Nova Home Loans Arizona Bowl (5:30 p.m. ET, Campus Insiders): South Alabama vs. Air Force
Capital One Orange Bowl (8 p.m. ET, ESPN): No. 6 Michigan vs. No. 11 Florida State

Saturday, Dec. 31
Buffalo Wild Wings Citrus Bowl (11 a.m. ET, ABC): No. 20 LSU vs. No. 13 Louisville
TaxSlayer Bowl (11 a.m. ET, ESPN): Georgia Tech vs. Kentucky
CFP Semifinal at Chick-fil-A Peach Bowl (3 p.m. ET, ESPN): No. 4 Washington vs. No. 1 Alabama
CFP Semifinal at PlayStation Fiesta Bowl (7 p.m. ET, ESPN): No. 3 Ohio State vs. No. 2 Clemson

Monday, Jan. 2
Outback Bowl (1 p.m. ET, ABC): No. 17 Florida vs. Iowa
Goodyear Cotton Bowl Classic (1 p.m. ET, ESPN): No. 15 Western Michigan vs. No. 8 Wisconsin
Rose Bowl Game presented by Northwestern Mutual (5 p.m. ET, ESPN): No. 9 USC vs. No. 5 Penn State
Allstate Sugar Bowl (8:30 p.m. ET, ESPN): No. 14 Auburn vs. No. 7 Oklahoma

Monday, Jan. 9
College Football Playoff National Championship (8 p.m. ET, ESPN): ALA/WASH vs. CLEM/OSU

Pair of QBs leaving Rutgers as graduate transfers; third QB leaving too

PISCATAWAY, NJ - OCTOBER 15: Quarterback Chris Laviano #5 of Rutgers attempts a pass during the second quarter against Illinois on October 15, 2016 in Piscataway, New Jersey. Illinois defeated Rutgers 24-7. (Photo by Rich Schultz/Getty Images)
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Rutgers’ quarterback room will have a decidedly different look when the next season rolls around.

Earlier in the week, Hayden Rettig confirmed his desire to transfer from the Scarlet Knights.  Not long after, Chris Laviano (pictured) confirmed that he would be doing the same.

Both Rettig and Laviano will be leaving RU as graduates, meaning they can transfer to another FBS program and be eligible to play immediately in 2017.

Laviano had started 18 consecutive games until he was benched in October.  Rettig, a former LSU transfer, played in five games the past two seasons after redshirting his first season in Piscataway.

Giovanni Rescigno took over for Laviano around midseason this year and started the last five games of what turned out to be a 2-10 first season for head coach Chris Ash.  The Scarlet Knights lost all five of Rescigno’s starts, losing the first two by a combined eight points.  They lost the last three, though, by a total of 106 points and scored just 13 combined in the process.

The junior Rescigno will return in 2017, as will Zach Allen, a transfer from TCU.

In addition to Rettig and Laviano, Mike Dare has confirmed to nj.com that he too will be transferring.  Dare came to the Knights as a touted 2015 pro-style quarterback, but the coaching change from Kyle Flood to Ash proved too much for the in-state product to overcome.

“I had a sitdown with [offensive coordinator Drew] Mehringer and I really wanted to see what the plans were in the near future,” Dare told the website. “We were talking for a while, and we both knew that this offense didn’t suit me very well. I came to a pro-style offense, a coaching change happened, and I’m not mad at it.

Dare would be forced to sit out the 2017 season if he lands at another FBS program, leaving him with two years of eligibility remaining beginning in 2018.

2016 College Football Bowl Projections after Week 13

NASHVILLE, TN - NOVEMBER 26:  Darrius Sims #6 celebrates after scoring a touchdown against the University of Tennessee Volunteers during the second half at Vanderbilt Stadium on November 26, 2016 in Nashville, Tennessee. Vanderbilt defeated Tennessee 45-34.  (Photo by Frederick Breedon/Getty Images)
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As we exit a wild Thanksgiving week filled with rivalry game upsets and head toward the final week of the regular season, it’s crazy to think that college football is over for a lot of teams. At the same time, there are dozens of others wondering what’s next on the docket with the postseason picture still slowly coming into focus. Most teams are left wondering just how the bowl picture will shake out and it could come right down to the end for several teams looking to find a spot from the College Football Playoff on down.

With all that in mind, CFTalk decided to peer into our crystal ball and see how every game the rest of the year plays out and which teams wind up in certain bowl games. Running through all the scenarios, here’s how the bowl picture could play out from the final four to the very first one on December 17:

College Football Playoff

Bowl Teams
Peach Bowl No. 1 Alabama No. 4 Washington
Fiesta Bowl No. 2 Clemson No. 3 Ohio State

New Year’s Six

Bowl Teams
Rose Bowl Wisconsin USC
Sugar Bowl Oklahoma Florida
Orange Bowl Florida State Michigan
Cotton Bowl Penn State Western Michigan

2016 FBS Bowl Games

Bowl Teams
New Mexico Bowl UTSA New Mexico
Las Vegas Bowl North Texas+ San Diego State
Cure Bowl UL-Lafayette UCF
Camellia Bowl Arkansas State Central Michigan
New Orleans Bowl Southern Miss Appalachian State
Miami Beach Bowl Tulsa Toledo
Boca Raton Bowl Western Kentucky Houston
Poinsettia Bowl BYU* Wyoming
Famous Idaho Potato Bowl Colorado State Miami (OH)
Bahamas Bowl Old Dominion* Eastern Michigan*
Armed Forces Bowl Navy* Mississippi State+
Dollar General Bowl Troy Ohio
Hawaii Bowl Middle Tenn. State Hawaii
St. Petersburg Bowl South Florida Army
Quick Lane Bowl Maryland Boston College
Independence Bowl South Carolina N.C. State
Heart of Dallas Bowl Louisiana Tech South Alabama
Military Bowl Wake Forest Temple
Holiday Bowl Iowa Stanford
Cactus Bowl Baylor Air Force
Pinstripe Bowl Northwestern Pitt
Russell Athletic Bowl Virginia Tech West Virginia
Foster Farms Bowl Indiana Washington State
Texas Bowl Texas A&M Kansas State
Birmingham Bowl Vanderbilt Memphis
Belk Bowl Georgia Tech Kentucky
Alamo Bowl Oklahoma State Colorado
Liberty Bowl Tennessee TCU
Sun Bowl North Carolina Utah
Music City Bowl Minnesota Georgia
TaxSlayer Bowl Miami (FL) Arkansas
Outback Bowl Nebraska LSU
Citrus Bowl Louisville Auburn
Arizona Bowl Idaho Boise State

*Accepted bowl invite
+ 5-7 team selected based on APR

Charlie Strong era (likely) ends in Texas’ 22-point loss to TCU

Fans hold signs in support of Texas head coach Charlie Strong during the first half of an NCAA college football game against TCU, Friday, Nov. 25, 2016, in Austin, Texas. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
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If this was the curtain call for the Charlie Strong era at Texas, it ended just the way more than half of his other previous did — with a loss.

With speculation regarding Tom Herman enveloping the football program, there was a school of thought that, with a blowout win over TCU Friday afternoon, Strong had a chance to save his job and make it back for a fourth season in Austin.  If that’s the case, it’s not meant to be for Strong as red zone woes played a role early on before the Longhorns’ fourth-quarter mini-meltdown pushed the Horned Frogs to a 31-9 win.

Darius Anderson ran for 103 yards on just three carries, including a backbreaking 70-yard touchdown run midway through the fourth quarter that put an emphatic exclamation point on the win.  With one game remaining, TCU has now hit the six-win mark and will go bowling for the third straight season and 14th time in 16 seasons under Gary Patterson.

As has been the case most of the season, one of the few bright spots for UT was D’Onta Foreman.  The junior running back ran for 165 yards, his 13th straight game with 100-plus yards.  The performance also pushed him over 2,000 yards on the season, making him, along with Ricky Williams, just the second player in UT history to go for 2K yards in a single season.

He failed, though, to find the end zone, which was an overriding theme of this latest loss.

The ‘Horns made six trips into the red zone through the first three quarters, and came away with just nine points in what was a 17-9 game at the end of the third.  Twice they turned the ball over on downs, and once they gave the ball back on a missed field goal.

It was not only symptomatic and symbolic of this game, but of Strong’s first three years at UT as a whole as he simply couldn’t get his team over the hump regardless of how close people thought he was.

After a 6-7 mark his first year, Strong has gone 5-7 in back-to-back seasons.  Those 16 wins are the fewest in a three-year stretch since David McWilliams hit the same number in his first three seasons from 1987-89.  McWilliams ended up getting two more seasons at the helm, although patience isn’t what it was three decades ago.

This will also be the first time since a three-year stretch from 1991-93 that the ‘Horns have failed to go bowling in two or more consecutive seasons, yet another data point trending toward a dismissal.

The true lowpoint under Strong, and what will likely prove to be the proverbial final nail in his coaching coffin, though, was the loss to Kansas last Saturday, the first to the Jayhawks since the 1938 season.  The group think is that no UT head coach could survive a loss to KU, especially a sub-.500 one like Strong.

With the Longhorns’ 2016 season over, all the attention will now turn to when, possibly (probably?), the trigger is pulled and Strong is dismissed.  If Strong is to be fired, UT’s administration needs to do it immediately and not string it out.  You may have questions about his coaching ability, but Strong is a good and honorable man who doesn’t deserve any further embarrassment and indignity.

The rumor mill has done more than enough of that these last couple of months, especially the past week or so.

TCU safety Caylin Moore named Rhodes Scholar

FORT WORTH, TX - DECEMBER 06:  The TCU Horned Frogs mascot, "Super Frog" performs during the Big 12 college football game against the Iowa State Cyclones at Amon G. Carter Stadium on December 6, 2014 in Fort Worth, Texas. The Horned Frongs defeated the Cyclones 55-3. (Photo by Christian Petersen/Getty Images)
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This season hasn’t gone the way TCU intended, but the Frogs received a nice pick-me-up on Saturday night. Horned Frogs safety Caylin Moore was notified that he has been named a recipient of the esteemed Rhodes Scholarship.

One of 32 American students to receive the honor, Moore’s path to Oxford University is all the more impressive when one considers the obstacles he had to overcome simply to get there. From TCU:

Moore overcame a number of obstacles to earn an academic scholarship at TCU, from growing up in inner-city Los Angeles and being homeless during his youth, to having a father who is in prison for life and a mother who was a victim of domestic abuse and sexual assault.

After starting his career at Marist, where he became a janitor to help make ends meet financially, Moore transferred to TCU before the 2015 season.

Hailing from Carson, Calif.,, Moore has registered a 3.9 grade-point average in economics while also pursuing a double minor in mathematics and sociology.

Moore is a member of the 25th anniversary Allstate AFCA Good Works Team and was a finalist for the Big 12 Sportsperson of the Year award earlier this year.