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Washington adds San Jose State assistant as 10th coach

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Yet another Power Five program has poached one from the Group Of Five to fill the 10th assistant role that went into effect this week.

Washington became the latest to do the poaching, with UW confirming that Will Harris has joined Chris Petersen‘s staff as defensive backs coach.  The move, at least for now, completes what would be Petersen’s fifth staff with the program.

“Will is an excellent, young coach who I think will fit our team and our culture well,” Petersen said in a statement. “We’re excited to have him join our staff.”

The past two seasons, Harris worked as the defensive backs coach at San Jose State.

That was Harris’ first job at the FBS level; this will, obviously, be the first Power Five job in a coaching career that began less than a decade ago and has included a stop in Southern California’s Snoop League.

Sean Lewis adds coordinators on both sides of the ball to first Kent State coaching staff

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Arguably the two most important hires Sean Lewis makes as he embarks on his first head-coaching job are in place.

Kent State announced Friday that Andrew Sowder and Tom Kaufman have been added to his first coaching staff, the former on the offensive side and the latter on the defensive side.  Kaufman will also carry the title of associate head coach for the Golden Flashes.

“Tom is a Northeast Ohio guy,” the first-year head coach said in a statement. “He’s a relentless recruiter and a great football mind. He’s going to bring an aggressive, attacking defense that was No. 1 in the SoCon last year. I couldn’t be more excited to have him on board. …

“I have a great relationship with Andrew. He helped groom and develop Roger Lewis who’s an NFL starter with the New York Giants. He understands our system and the idea of playing FlashFast. He fully embraces it and I can’t wait to get on the field with him.”

Sowder spent the 2017 season as the offensive coordinator and right ends coach at San Jose State.  Kaufman was the defensive coordinator at FCS Chattanooga in this past season.

Lewis and Kaufman worked together on the same staff at Syracuse in 2016, the former as offensive coordinator and the latter as special teams coordinator/linebackers coach.

Herm Edwards: ‘I am very excited and humbled to be the Arizona State head football coach’

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If nothing else, this should prove to be fascinating theatre.

Word broke Saturday evening that, after a few days worth of speculation, Herm Edwards was set to be named as the new head football coach at Arizona State.  Sunday night, that stunning development officially came to fruition as the Sun Devils “unveiled plans for a restructured ASU football model” by naming Edwards as the program’s 24th coach.

According to the school, the hiring is pending the approval of the Arizona Board of Regents.

“Passion for my faith, my family and my occupation as a football coach are the things that have driven me back to the grass,” said Edwards in a statement. “My personal commitment to build young men to be whole people through the game of football is completely in alignment with the vision President Michael Crow and Vice President for University Athletics Ray Anderson have for this program. I stand ready for the challenge of working with them to elevate Sun Devil Football. I am very excited and humbled to be the Arizona State head football coach.”

The 63-year-old Edwards’ last coaching job at any level came as the head coach of the NFL’s Kansas City Chiefs in 2008; his last (and only) college job was as the defensive backs coach at San Jose State from 1987-89.  Since 2009, he’s been an NFL analyst for ESPN.

For perspective, the last time Edwards was a coach at the collegiate level, Urban Meyer was the quarterbacks/wide receivers coach at Illinois State and Nick Saban was the defensive backs coach of the Houston Oilers; Lincoln Riley, one of the four 2017 playoff head coaches, was a first-grader; Bo Schembechler was in his last season as the head coach at Michigan; and there were a total of 18 bowl games (there are now 174).

The school noted in its release that Edwards “has most recently served as a coach for the past eight years at the Under Armour All-American game, which features the top high school football recruits in the country,” so there’s that, which is nice.

ASU’s current athletic director, Ray Anderson, served as Edwards’ agent during a coaching career that seemingly ended nearly a decade ago.

“During my years with and around the NFL, there is not a more respected man that has the passion for the game of football like that of Herm Edwards,” Anderson said. “I have no doubt his ability to lead, inspire and develop young men will translate into his staff and into recruiting, and I’m confident he is the visionary and leader we need to command this new ASU football model.”

As for that new football model?  From the school’s release:

The department’s New Leadership Model will be similar to an NFL approach using a general manager structure. It’s a collaborative approach to managing the ASU football program that includes sport and administrative divisions, which will operate as distinct, but collective units focused on elevating all aspects of Sun Devil Football. This structure will allow the department to form a multi-layered method to the talent evaluation and recruiting processes, increase its emphasis on both student-athlete and coach development and retention, and provide a boost in resource allocation and generation.

“Our goal for this football program is to reach unprecedented heights, and therefore we need to find a way to operate more innovatively and efficiently than we have in the past,” Anderson said. “In the spirit of innovation, our vision for this program is to have a head coach who serves as a CEO and is the central leader with a collaborative staff around him that will elevate the performance of players and coaches on the field, in the classroom and in our community. Equally important, the head coach will be a dynamic and tireless recruiter.

OK then.

Schools across the FBS honoring the military on Veteran’s Day

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The whole of college football is making sure its message of support for those who serve gets heard loud and clear.

This year, Veteran’s Day just happens to fall on a gameday, and arguably the biggest college football gameday of the 2017 season in fact. Whether it be helmets or uniforms or in-game presentations, schools throughout the week have unveiled their gameday plans for honoring our nation’s military.

Kevin mentioned a couple on Wednesday; below is but a sampling of others who will honor those brave men and women who have allowed, and continue to allow, all of us to continue to enjoy this great sport, and every other freedom we enjoy for that matter.

And, from CFT as a whole and myself personally, God bless every single member of every branch of the military, past and present. From the bottom of our collective hearts, thank you so much for your service.

56 college football assistants named nominees for 2017 Broyles Award

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College football’s award season is coming quickly with semifinalists and finalists for various awards coming in the next few weeks. Among the awards is the Broyles Award, which recognizes the top assistant coach in college football. Today, the Frank & Barbara Broyles Foundation released its list of nominees for this year’s award. All 56 of them, which is sure to keep more SIDs busy this time of year.

No school has more than one assistant nominated for the award and previous winners of the award from the past five seasons are not eligible. Clemson’s Brent Venables won the award last year, for example, so he is not eligible this season. This list of nominees will be trimmed to 15 semifinalists later this season, and that list will be cut down to five finalists for the award.

The Broyles Award was first awarded in 2010 to Auburn offensive coordinator Gus Malzahn. Malzahn is currently the head coach of the Tigers. In total, five Broyles Award winners have gone on to be a head coach, with four of those currently holding head coaching positions. Pitt head coach Pat Narduzzi (2013, Michigan State defensive coordinator), Texas head coach Tom Herman (2014, Ohio State offensive coordinator), and Oklahoma head coach Lincoln Riley (2015, Oklahoma offensive coordinator) currently hold head coaching jobs. Bob Diaco, who won the award in 2012 while at Notre Dame, went on to be named the head coach at UConn and currently is an assistant with Nebraska.

2017 Broyles Award Nominees

  • Alabama – Brian Daboll, Offensive Coordinator/Quarterbacks
  • Arizona – Rod Smith, Co–Offensive Coordinator
  • Arizona State – Phil Bennett, Defensive Coordinator
  • Arkansas State – Brian Early, Defensive Line Coach
  • Auburn – Kevin Steele, Defensive Coordinator
  • Boise State – Andy Avalos, Defensive Coordinator/Linebackers
  • Bowling Green State – Matt Brock, Special Teams Coordinator/Linebackers Coach
  • California – Beau Baldwin, Offensive Coordinator
  • Central Florida – Troy Walters, Offensive Coordinator
  • Clemson – Tony Elliot, Co–Offensive Coordinator, Running Backs
  • Eastern Michigan – Neal Neathery, Defensive Coordinator/Linebackers Coach
  • FAU – Chris Kiffin, Defensive Coordinator
  • FIU – Brent Guy, Defensive Coordinator/Linebackers
  • Fresno State – Orlondo Steinauer, Defensive Coordinator
  • Georgia – Mel Tucker, Defensive Coordinator
  • Georgia State – Nate Fuqua, Defensive Coordinator/Outside Linebackers
  • Iowa State – Jon Heacock, Defensive Coordinator/Safeties
  • Kansas State – Sean Snyder, Special Teams Coordinator
  • LSU – Dave Aranda, Defensive Coordinator
  • Memphis – Joe Lorig, Special Teams Coordinator; – Outside Linebackers
  • Miami – Manny Diaz, Defensive Coordinator
  • Michigan – Don Brown, Defensive Coordinator/Linebackers
  • Michigan State – Harlon Barnett, Co–Defensive Coordinator/Secondary Coach
  • Mississippi State – Todd Grantham, Defensive Coordinator/Linebackers
  • Missouri – Josh Heupel, Offensive Coordinator/Quarterbacks
  • NC State – Dwayne Ledford, Offensive Line Coach/Run Game Coordinator
  • North Texas – Graham Harrell, Offensive Coordinator
  • Northwestern – Mike Hankwitz, Defensive Coordinator
  • Notre Dame – Mike Elko, Defensive Coordinator
  • Ohio State – Larry Johnson, Assistant Head Coach/Defensive Line Coach
  • Oklahoma – Bill Bedenbaugh, Offensive Coordinator/Offensive Line
  • Oklahoma State – Mike Yurcich, Offensive Coordinator/QBs
  • Ole Miss – Derrick Nix, Running Backs Coach
  • Oregon – Jim Leavitt, Defensive Coordinator
  • Penn State – Brent Pry, Defensive Coordinator/Linebackers Coach
  • San José State – Bojay Filimoeatu, Linebackers Coach
  • SMU – Joe Craddock, Offensive Coordinator
  • South Carolina – Coleman Hutzler, Special Teams Coordinator/Linebackers Coach
  • Southern Miss – Tony Pecoraro, Defensive Coordinator/Inside Linebackers
  • Stanford – Mike Bloomgren, Offensive Coordinator/Offensive Line
  • Syracuse – Brian Ward, Defensive Coordinator/Linebackers Coach
  • TCU – Chad Glasgow, Defensive Coordinator
  • Temple – Jim Panagos, Defensive Line
  • Texas – Todd Orlando, Defensive Coordinator/Linebackers
  • Toledo – Brian Wright, Offensive Coordinator/Quarterbacks Coach
  • Troy – Vic Koenning, Defensive Coordinator
  • U.S. Military Academy – Brent Davis, Offensive Coordinator/Offensive Line
  • USC – Tee Martin, Offensive Coordinator/WR Coach
  • Utah State – Mark Tommerdahl, Special Teams Coordinator/Running Backs
  • Virginia Tech – Bud Foster, Defensive Coordinator
  • Wake Forest – Warren Ruggiero, Offensive Coordinator
  • Washington – Pete Kwiatkowski, Defensive Coordinator
  • Washington State – Alex Grinch, Defensive Coordinator / Secondary
  • West Virginia – Tony Gibson, Associate Head Coach/Defensive Coordinator/Linebackers
  • Western Kentucky – Clayton White, Defensive Coordinator
  • Wisconsin – Jim Leonhard, Defensive Coordinator