Colorado Buffaloes

FORT WORTH, TX - OCTOBER 25:  Davis Webb #7 of the Texas Tech Red Raiders throws the ball against the TCU Horned Frogs at Amon G. Carter Stadium on October 25, 2014 in Fort Worth, Texas.  (Photo by Ronald Martinez/Getty Images)
Getty Images

After leaving Texas Tech, QB Davis Webb lands at Colorado

3 Comments

Exactly four weeks after officially leaving his first college football home, Davis Webb has unofficially found his second.

In a move that’s been expected for a week or more, Webb confirmed to FOXSports.com‘s Bruce Feldman that he has committed to continuing his collegiate playing career at Colorado. With starter Sefo Liufau likely out for the 2016 season because of a left-foot fracture — specifically, the dreaded Lis Franc diagnosis — sustained in mid-November, Webb, who will be eligible to play immediately, will enter spring practice as a favorite to win the starting job for the Buffaloes.

Webb made his decision before taking a planned official visit to Auburn.

“I just know it’s a good fit with Colorado,” Webb told Feldman. “I really like what [head coach Mike MacIntyre] and [offensive coordinator Brian] Lindgren are doing with the offense. I like that they are scheduled to play eight preseason Top 25 teams. I’ll have a good chance to showcase my ability on the road at Oregon and at Michigan. I will get plenty of exposure to pursue my dream of playing in the NFL.

“I really feel Colorado is just a couple of players from taking that next step to where the Colorado Buffaloes have been before (in the Top 25) and where Colorado should be.”

Webb, who will have one year of eligibility remaining, also took to Twitter to confirm his commitment.

Webb started 14 games combined for Texas Tech in 2013 and 2014. He lost a competition the following year to Patrick Mahomes, whose record-setting year at Tech in 2015 set him up to be a preseason favorite for the 2016 Heisman Trophy. Sitting behind the redshirt freshman last season, Webb played in five games, mostly in mop-up duty.

For his career in Lubbock, Webb completed 62 percent of his 747 passes for 5,557 yards, 46 touchdowns and 22 interceptions.

SEC, Ohio State tops on Carolina, Denver Super Bowl rosters

KNOXVILLE, TN - OCTOBER 29:  Former Tennesse quarterback Peyton Manning and current quarterback for the Indianapolis Colts is honored alongside his former college coach Phillip Fulmer before the start of the game against the South Carolina Gamecocks on October 29, 2005 at Neyland Stadium in Knoxville, Tennessee.  (Photo by Streeter Lecka/Getty Images)
Getty Images
5 Comments

Cam Newton may be hurtling toward history, but the former Auburn quarterback will not be the lone player representing the SEC in next month’s Super Bowl.  In fact, he’s far, far from it.

As you may have heard, Newton’s Carolina Panthers are set to square off with Peyton Manning‘s Denver Broncos in the 50th Super Bowl Feb. 3.  Manning and Newton are two of and FBS-best 30 former SEC players who are on the two teams’ rosters, which includes those on the 53-man, reserved/injured list, practice squad, reserved/suspended by commissioner and reserve/future squad.

The Pac-12 is next with 23, followed by the Big Ten (21) and ACC (17).  The final Power Five conference, the Big 12, has 10, three less than the Mountain West’s 13.  The AAC, with eight, is the only Group of Five league to come close to double digits.  The MAC, meanwhile, is the only conference to be shutout, while all of the other divisions in the NCAA combined for 18 players.

Nearly every SEC team is represented in this year’s big game, the lone exception being Vanderbilt.  Of the dozen schools in the Pac-12, only Arizona and Washington State are missing.  Both the ACC and Big Ten have 11 of their 14 teams in the game, the lone exceptions being Clemson, Louisville and Virginia Tech for the former and Illinois, Minnesota and Rutgers for the latter.

One of those B1G schools that’s in, Nebraska, has had at least one player on a Super Bowl roster for 23 straight years, the longest active streak for any FBS program.

Ohio State easily outdistances individual schools with seven, three more than the four each for Auburn, Georgia Tech, Oregon State and Tennessee.  Alabama, Arizona State, Colorado State, Georgia, Nevada, Notre Dame, Oklahoma, Oregon, Texas A&M, USC and Utah.

A total of 20 schools have two players each, including Coastal Carolina, the only non-FBS program in the group.  The other 19 includes Arkansas, Boise State, Duke, Florida, Florida State, Iowa, Kansas, Maryland, Michigan, Mississippi State, Missouri, North Carolina, San Diego State, South Carolina, Stanford, Troy, Tulane, Washington and Wisconsin.

Ex-Vols QB Sheriron Jones transferring from Buffs to… the Vols

TAMPA, FL - JANUARY 1:  Head coach Butch Jones against the Northwestern Wildcats during the Outback Bowl at Raymond James Stadium on January 1, 2016 in Tampa, Florida. (Photo by Mike Carlson/Getty Images)
Getty Images
1 Comment

In the end, Sheriron Jones is right back where he began.

On Jan. 7 of this year, it was reported that Jones would be transferring from Tennessee to Colorado.  Roughly two weeks later?  Never mind.  Pretend it never happened.

In a statement Friday afternoon, CU head coach Mike MacIntyre announced that he has granted Jones a release from his scholarship.  MacIntyre’s reasoning is that “[w]e have concluded that it is in his best interests for him to return to Tennessee.”

“My job is to work with the whole person,” MacIntyre said in the statement. “Each player is unique and comes with unique needs and concerns. Throughout the past couple of weeks, Sheriron and I have spent a lot of time trying to sort out his circumstances.”

For what it’s worth, UT officials have yet to confirm that the quarterback is returning to Knoxville and the UT football team.

No reason was given for Jones’ initial departure from the Vols, nor is there any reason given for his decision to leave the Buffaloes. The good news is that Jones should be eligible to play for the Vols in 2016 despite the transfer as an NCAA rule permits players to return to their original institution within a two-week period and not have to sit out a season.

While Jones won’t compete for the starting job in 2016 — Josh Dobbs has that on lockdown — he is certainly capable of doing so in the future.

Jones was a four-star member of UT’s recruiting class a year ago, rated as the No. 10 dual-threat quarterback in the country and the No. 40 player at any position in the state of California. He was one of two quarterbacks signed in that class, joined by fellow four-star signee Jauan Jennings.

Jones took a redshirt his true freshman season.

Hall of Fame announces 16-member 2016 class

Randall Cunningham
UNLV athletics
2 Comments

As has become customary this time of the year, the College Football Hall of Fame has announced yet another class on its way to enshrinement.

Friday afternoon in Arizona, the National Football Foundation announced that is 16 individuals strong — 14 players, two head coaches.  The NFF stated that “[t]he inductees were selected from the national ballot of 76 All-America players and five elite coaches from the Football Bowl Subdivision and the 92 players and 27 coaches from the divisional ranks.”

Of the 14 players on their way to induction, 11 came from the FBS level — 10 from Power Five programs — while the other three hail from the likes of Nebraska-Omaha (quarterback Marlin Briscoe), Harvard (punter Pat McInally) and Ashland (OH) (linebacker Bill Royce). Both of the coaches set for enshrinement come from non-FBS programs — New Hampshire’s Bill Bowes and Frank Girardi of Lycoming (Pa.).

Below are the complete list of individuals who will officially be inducted during a ceremony Dec. 6 in New York City:

Marlin Briscoe – QB, Nebraska Omaha (1964-67)
Derrick Brooks – LB, Florida State (1991-94)
Tom Cousineau – LB, Ohio State (1975-78)
Randall Cunningham – P/QB, UNLV (1982-84)
Troy Davis – TB, Iowa State (1994-96)
William Fuller – DT, North Carolina (1981-83)
Bert Jones – QB, LSU (1970-72)
Tim Krumrie – DL, Wisconsin (1979-82)
Pat McInally – TE, Harvard (1972-74)
Herb Orvis – DE, Colorado (1969-71)
Bill Royce – LB, Ashland (Ohio) (1990-93)
Mike Utley – OG, Washington State (1985-88)
Scott Woerner – DB, Georgia (1977-80)
Rod Woodson – DB, Purdue (1983-86)

“We are extremely proud to announce the 2016 College Football Hall of Fame Class,” said Archie Manning, NFF Chairman and a 1989 College Football Hall of Famer from Mississippi. “Each of these men has established himself among the absolute best to have ever played or coached the game, and we look forward to immortalizing their incredible accomplishments.”

Now, for those who are wondering — and are pissed off because Player X from Y State University isn’t on his way to enshrinement — below are the Hall of Fame’s ofttimes controversial rules for induction:

1. First and foremost, a player must have received First Team All-America recognition by a selector organization that is recognized by the NCAA and utilized to comprise their consensus All-America teams.

2. A player becomes eligible for consideration by the Foundation’s honors courts ten years after his final year of intercollegiate football played.

3. While each nominee’s football achievements in college are of prime consideration, his post football record as a citizen is also weighed. He must have proven himself worthy as a citizen, carrying the ideals of football forward into his relations with his community and fellow man. Consideration may also be given for academic honors and whether or not the candidate earned a college degree.

4. Players must have played their last year of intercollegiate football within the last 50 years*. For example, to be eligible for the 2016 ballot, the player must have played his last year in 1966 or thereafter. In addition, players who are playing professionally and coaches who are coaching on the professional level are not eligible until after they retire.

5. A coach becomes eligible three years after retirement or immediately following retirement provided he is at least 70 years of age. Active coaches become eligible at 75 years of age. He must have been a head coach for a minimum of 10 years and coached at least 100 games with a .600 winning percentage.

* Players that do not comply with the 50-year rule may still be eligible for consideration by the Football Bowl Subdivision and Divisional Honors Review Committees, which examine unique cases.

Four-star 2015 QB Sheriron Jones transferring from Vols to Buffs

BOULDER, CO - NOVEMBER 13:  Head Coach Mike MacIntyre of the Colorado Buffaloes looks on during the first quarter against the USC Trojans at Folsom Field on November 13, 2015 in Boulder, Colorado. (Photo by Justin Edmonds/Getty Images)
Getty Images
1 Comment

After a very brief stay in Knoxville, a member of Tennessee’s 2015 recruiting class has decided to head west to continue his collegiate playing career.

The high school coach of Sheriron Jones confirmed to 247Sports.com that his former player has decided to transfer out of the Vols football program. More specifically, the coach stated that the quarterback will be moving on to Colorado and playing his football for the Mike MacIntyre‘s Buffaloes.

If Jones does indeed move on to CU, he would be forced to sit out the 2016 season, but then would have three more years of eligibility remaining beginning in 2017.

While Jones didn’t confirm the move, he did offer up a gracias to his fans of the last few months.

Jones was a four-star member of UT’s recruiting class a year ago, rated as the No. 10 dual-threat quarterback in the country and the No. 40 player at any position in the state of California. He was one of two quarterbacks signed in that class, joined by fellow four-star signee Jauan Jennings.

Jones took a redshirt his true freshman season.