Colorado Buffaloes

TEMPE, AZ - DECEMBER 07:  Pac-12 Commissioner, Larry Scott stands in front of the Stanford Cardinal as they celebrate the Pac 12 Championship after defeating the Arizona State Sun Devils 38-14 at Sun Devil Stadium on December 7, 2013 in Tempe, Arizona.  (Photo by Christian Petersen/Getty Images)
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Pac-12 to tamper down on select #Pac12AfterDark kickoffs

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When you allow television networks to pay you $3 billion to broadcast football games and happen to be located on the West Coast, you’re going to pay for it in the form of late kickoffs. ESPN and Fox want eyeballs on their networks as long as possible on fall Saturdays, and they’re not putting SEC games on at 10 p.m. Eastern time.

So, naturally, the Pac-12 drew those time slots.

And they absolutely hated it.

Remember, this is a conference that only recently joined the 21st century. For decades, the conference was happy with its 10 teams, its football games played on Saturday afternoons and its basketball schedule diced into a handy Thursday-Saturday format. Larry Scott was hired in 2009 to modernize the league while increasing the bottom line, and part of that required late kickoffs.

But on Tuesday the conference announced it has worked with its television partners to reduce the number of late kickoffs. ESPN and Fox won’t change their late slots, but the conference has received clearance to play Pac-12 Network games in previously exclusive windows of 2 p.m. or 6:30 p.m. local time. The change is expected to reduce the late night kickoffs by “up to” four games.

“The Pac-12 has some of the most loyal fans in college athletics and we appreciate our television partners working with us on this important issue for fans,” Oregon AD Rob Mullens said in a statement. “The increased exposure and revenue from our contracts with ESPN and FOX Sports have been instrumental to our success, but we continue to work hard to minimize as much as possible the negative impact late start times have on our fans who travel great distances to see our teams in person.”

Additionally, the conference announced it has instituted a field storming fine structure of $25,000 for a first offense, $50,000 for a second offense and $100,000 for a third offense. The SEC has a similar structure on its books.

“The Pac-12 Council carefully considered this policy and its impact on our fans who loyally support our teams,” Cal AD Mike Williams said. “This enhanced policy underscores the importance our universities place on the safety and welfare of our student-athletes, officials and fans, and will allow us to educate staffs and fans on procedures going forward.”

Finally, Pac-12 Network will start broadcasting eSports contests between member schools. Clear your schedule now.

Davis Webb explains his clean, well-received exit from Colorado

FORT WORTH, TX - OCTOBER 25:  Davis Webb #7 of the Texas Tech Red Raiders throws the ball against the TCU Horned Frogs at Amon G. Carter Stadium on October 25, 2014 in Fort Worth, Texas.  (Photo by Ronald Martinez/Getty Images)
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In college football’s social media age, far too many times has a player decommitted or transferred from a school and been attacked not just by that program’s fans, but by coaches inside it.

While not every instance of that results in a Les Miles-esque “chest” comment or a position coach going on an ill-advised rant, others are met with short, terse responses. Maybe that’s why Davis Webb’s decision to spurn Colorado and attend Cal stood out.

When Webb, who signed a financial aid agreement with Colorado in January, announced last week he would instead play a fifth year at Cal, the response from Boulder was classy and supportive. Buffaloes offensive coordinator Darrin Chiaverini sent this tweet:

//platform.twitter.com/widgets.jsThis was a good look for a Colorado program that, in reality, really could’ve used Webb. The Buffs haven’t been to a bowl game since 2007 and last finished over .500 in 2005. Adding Webb could’ve helped turn things around for Mike MacIntyre & Co., who went 4-9 in 2015.

Fox Sports’ Bruce Feldman talked to Webb about his decision, though, and it’s clear the former Texas Tech quarterback went about his Boulder-to-Berkeley decision the right way:

The grad transfer quarterback from Texas Tech, though, wanted to make sure the coaches at Colorado didn’t hear the news from someone else first. Webb, a coach’s son, had committed to CU in late January, signing financial aid papers that bound the school to him legally more than it did him to them. However, some things changed since then and so last week the 6-5, 220-pounder first dialed up CU head coach Mike MacIntyre and then offensive coordinator Darrin Chiaverini, a former Red Raiders assistant, to tell them that a better fit for Webb had come along. 

“Those two guys had invested a lot of time and effort recruiting me, and I really respect them,” Webb told FOX Sports. “They handled it very professionally. It was nothing against Colorado, but at the same time, I only have one year to do this.

(Read Feldman’s full story here)

This was a good moment for how to handle a college student changing his mind, but it shouldn’t take the kind of maturity Webb displayed here for coaches to have the reaction they had to him leaving. Seething in private is natural when a kid spurns your program, but grown men ripping high school or college students in public for being indecisive always comes across as a low blow.

Report: QB Davis Webb spurns Colorado, opts for Cal

FILE - In this Dec. 30, 2013 file photo, Texas Tech quarterback Davis Webb throws a pass during his record setting first half against Arizona State in the Holiday Bowl NCAA college football football game in San Diego. Texas Tech opens the season on Saturday when they host Central Arkanas. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull, File)
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Even amidst reports that Davis Webb, who announced his commitment to Colorado in January, was considering other transfer options, Buffs head coach Mike MacIntyre was, at least publicly, confident that he could hang on to the ex-Texas Tech quarterback.

In the end, MacIntyre should’ve been publicly worried instead.

While nothing is official from any school, reports began surfacing earlier in the day Wednesday that Webb has decided to instead take his talents to Cal. The player himself subsequently confirmed to FOXSports.com‘s Bruce Feldman that the Golden Bears are his new destination.

Webb, who also considered Auburn after committing to Colorado, would be eligible to play immediately in 2016, his final season of eligibility.

Webb started 14 games combined for Texas Tech in 2013 and 2014. He lost a competition the following year to Patrick Mahomes, whose record-setting year at Tech in 2015 set him up to be a preseason favorite for the 2016 Heisman Trophy. Sitting behind the redshirt freshman last season, Webb played in five games, mostly in mop-up duty.

For his career in Lubbock, Webb completed 62 percent of his 747 passes for 5,557 yards, 46 touchdowns and 22 interceptions.

Suspended Colorado players formally charged with three felonies

NJ Falo
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Two members of the Colorado football program have officially stepped in it — and stepped into it deep.

Late last month, linebacker N.J. Falo (pictured) and running back Dino Gordon were arrested in connection to an alleged dorm-room theft.  The duo had been accused of stealing prescription drugs, laptops, video games and other electronics from a dorm room earlier that month.

Wednesday, the Denver Post reports, both Falo and Gordon were formally charged with one count each of charged with second-degree burglary, theft between $2,000 and $5,000, possession of a controlled substance and second-degree trespassing.  The first three charges are all felonies; the burglary charge carries a potential prison sentence of 4-12 years.

A preliminary hearing has been set for June 1.

Both Buffaloes remain indefinitely suspended from the football team, although when they may return to the playing field is the least of their collective worries at the moment.

Falo played in seven games last season as a true freshman.  Gordon took a redshirt as a true freshman in 2015.

Colorado duo arrested on burglary, theft charges, suspended

NJ Falo
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Another day, another college football player (or two) on the wrong end of a pair of handcuffs.

The latest to trigger a resetting of the “Days Without An Arrest” ticker are linebacker N.J. Falo and running back Dino Gordon, a pair of Colorado Buffaloes who, according to the Boulder Daily Camera, were arrested very early Thursday morning on multiple charges related to an alleged dorm-room theft.  The modern-day Bonnie & Clod were officially charged with suspicion of second-degree burglary, theft between $2,000 and $4,999, drug possession and second-degree trespassing.

A university police spokesperson told the Daily Camera that Falo and Gordon are alleged to have stolen prescription drugs, laptops, video games and other electronics from a dorm room earlier this month.

As a result of the arrests, both players have been indefinitely suspended from the football program.

Falo played in seven games last season as a true freshman.  Gordon took a redshirt as a true freshman in 2015.

Gordon and Falo are the third and fourth football Buffaloes to be arrested this offseason.

In mid-March, defensive lineman Nathaniel Robbins was arrested on a whopping 18 charges after a domestic dispute ended with him allegedly tackling police officers.  Earlier this month, defensive lineman Samson Kafovalu was arrested on an obstruction charge.