Sun Belt Conference

BATON ROUGE, LA - SEPTEMBER 27:  Tyler Rogers #18 of the New Mexico State Aggies drops back to pass against the LSU Tigers during the first quarter of a game at Tiger Stadium on September 27, 2014 in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.  (Photo by Stacy Revere/Getty Images)
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Tyler Rodgers, NMSU’s starting QB, arrested on battery charge

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It’s not been a good day for a couple of starting quarterbacks at Group of Five programs.

The Las Cruces Sun-News has reported that New Mexico State’s Tyler Rogers turned himself in last Friday on a warrant that had been issued for him Aug. 14.  The junior was booked on one count of misdemeanor charge of battery against a household member.

The alleged victim is Rogers’ girlfriend. A verbal altercation at a party allegedly turned physical in a vehicle later on. When police arrived, the woman, who was initially crying, “downplayed the incident and said that it wasn’t really anything and that the altercation did not get physical and didn’t consider Mr. Rogers grabbing her arm as being a physical altercation.”

The woman decided against completing a domestic violence supplement report, and, according to the Sun-News, it’s unclear if the woman is cooperating with police.

“I was very disappointed in hearing the news but we are in the information gathering stage,” NMSU athletic director Mario Moccia said in a statement. “These are allegations that we take very seriously and we look forward to getting as much detail as possible so the university can be informed and the athletic department can make an informed decision moving forward.”

Because “it is a misdemeanor, there isn’t a suspension coming forth right now,” head coach Doug Martin said.

Rogers has started 15 games the past two seasons for the Aggies.

Health issues prompt Lloyd Carr to step down from playoff committee

Michigan players and head coach Lloyd Carr wait to run onto the field prior to action between the Michigan Wolverines and Indiana Hoosiers at Memorial Stadium in Bloomington, Indiana on November 11, 2006.  Michigan won 34-3. (Photo by G. N. Lowrance/Getty Images)
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For the third time in less than two years, health concerns have cost the College Football Playoff Committee a voting member.

With the new season less than two weeks away from kicking off, CFP executive director Bill Hancock announced Friday that Lloyd Carr has decided to step down from the committee that selects the four playoff teams.  According to Carr, unspecified “health issues” triggered his decision.

This year would’ve been Carr’s first on the committee.

“This is a difficult decision because I have enjoyed my preparations and I have the greatest respect for the other committee members and the playoff itself,” said Carr in a statement. “I regret that health issues will prevent me from executing the responsibilities expected of a committee member.”

The committee now has 12 members, and will remain there through the 2016 season as a new member will not be added.

“Lloyd will be missed,” Hancock said. “He knows and loves college football, but we all understand.”

In January of this year, Carr, the former Michigan head coach, was announced as one of four new committee members.  With Carr’s departure, the makeup of the committee looks as such:

Kirby Hocutt, Texas Tech AD, chairperson
Barry Alvarez, Wisconsin AD
Jeff Bower, former Southern Miss head coach
Herb Deromedi, winningest head coach in MAC history
Tom Jernstedt, former NCAA executive vice president
Bobby Johnson, former Vanderbilt head coach
Jeff Long, Arkansas AD
Rob Mullens, Oregon AD
Dan Radakovich, Clemson AD
Condoleezza Rice, former United States Secretary of State
Steve Wieberg, former sportswriter
Tyrone Willingham, former Notre Dame/Stanford/Washington head coach

In October of 2014, Archie Manning was forced to take a leave of absence because he needed additional surgery and wanted to concentrate on his health.  One year later, and based in part on doctor’s advice, Pat Haden stepped down from his post on the committee.

South Alabama to continue studying possibility of on-campus stadium

COLUMBIA, SC - NOVEMBER 22:  Teammates Desmond LaVelle #34 and Montell Garner #16 of the South Alabama Jaguars celebrate after recovering a fumble against the South Carolina Gamecocks during their game at Williams-Brice Stadium on November 22, 2014 in Columbia, South Carolina.  (Photo by Streeter Lecka/Getty Images)
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It’s never a good thing for your college football program to play in a stadium that’s 61 years older than the team it hosts. Such is the case for South Alabama, where the Jaguars, born in 2009, play in Ladd-Peebles Stadium, born in 1948.

The school has completed a feasibility study into building an on-campus stadium, which concluded three things:

A) Ladd-Peebles Stadium’s 36,000-seat capacity is about 10,000 seats too large.

B) Building an on-campus stadium would require displacing the university’s intramural programs.

C) It would cost between $85 million and $115 million to build it.

From a letter South Alabama president Dr. Tony Waldrop sent to school supporters and media:

At this point in the process, it has been determined that:

The most viable and logical site for a stadium would be the location of the current intramural fields near the football field house, with the intramural fields being relocated to another area of campus.

The logical seating capacity for a stadium would be in the range of 25,000 seats, with the capacity for additional expansion in the future if needed.

The cost of a stadium, along with the associated infrastructure and improvements, would fall into the range of approximately $85 to $115 million.

The results of this process tell us that construction of an on-campus stadium is feasible. At the same time, we also know that construction of a stadium can only be achieved with the assistance of external financial partnerships and significant philanthropic support. We will continue to examine possible models for financing, but at this time the University has not identified sources of funding that would allow us to advance to the next stage of planning.

So, yes, identifying a need for a stadium is one thing. Finding the money to do it is something else entirely.

GoDaddy Bowl changes name to Dollar General Bowl

MOBILE, AL - DECEMBER 23: Members of the Georgia Southern Eagles celebrate after defeating the Bowling Green Falcons on December 23, 2015 at Ladd Peebles Stadium in Mobile, Alabama. The Georgia Southern Eagles defeated the Bowling Green Falcons 58-27. (Photo by Michael Chang/Getty Images)
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The jokes pretty much write themselves on this one.

The GoDaddy Bowl has changed its name to the Dollar General Bowl effective immediately, it was announced Wednesday.

“Having a title sponsor in today’s world is just fantastic,” bowl president Jerry Silverstein told AL.com. “There are a lot of bowls out there, and for Mobile to get the recognition from a national sponsor, to want to participate in the event we have here, just leads to the national stage of what we try to produce here in Mobile.”

The new sponsor was celebrated in a very, uh, Dollar General way.

Heading into its 18th season, Dollar General Bowl will be the sixth different name and third separate title sponsor for the Mobile, Ala., based game. It was born in 1999 as the Mobile Alabama Bowl, then changed to the GMAC Mobile Alabama Bowl a year later. The name stuck as simply the GMAC Bowl from 2001-10, before the name switched to the GoDaddy.com Bowl in 2011. The “.com” was dropped before the 2014 game.

Representatives from the Sun Belt and MAC will compete in the 2016 game for the eighth consecutive season on the night of Dec. 23 (8 p.m. ET, ESPN). Georgia Southern took last year’s game by a 58-27 score over Bowling Green. The Sun Belt has claimed three of the last four Dollar General Bowls over its northern adversaries.

Watson, Mayfield headline Manning Award watch list

COLUMBIA, SC - NOVEMBER 28:  Deshaun Watson #4 of the Clemson Tigers after scoring a touchdown during their game against the South Carolina Gamecocks at Williams-Brice Stadium on November 28, 2015 in Columbia, South Carolina.  (Photo by Streeter Lecka/Getty Images)
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The Manning Award released its 30-member Watch List on Monday, in case you needed reminding which quarterbacks were the best in college football. The Manning separates itself from the Davey O’Brien and Unitas quarterback awards — and, more often than not, the Heisman and Maxwell, too — by taking bowl performances into account before handing out its trophy.

“We once again have a great group of quarterbacks returning to college football this fall,” said Archie Manning in a statement. “While this Watch List has many of the best returning players, we look forward to making midseason additions as teams settle on definite starters and as young players step up and make names for themselves. I’m really looking forward to getting the season rolling to see which guys will rise to the top and become Manning Award finalists.”

The Watch List includes:

  • Tommy Armstrong, Nebraska
  • J.T. Barrett, Ohio State
  • C.J. Beathard, Iowa
  • Jake Browning, Washington
  • Joshua Dobbs, Tennessee
  • Dane Evans, Tulsa
  • Luke Falk, Washington State
  • Quinton Flowers, South Florida
  • Skyler Howard, West Virginia
  • Lamar Jackson, Louisville
  • Brad Kaaya, Miami
  • Chad Kelly, Ole Miss
  • Trevor Knight, Texas A&M
  • Taylor Lamb, Appalachian State
  • Wes Lunt, Illinois
  • Patrick Mahomes, Texas Tech
  • Baker Mayfield, Oklahoma
  • Nick Mullens, Southern Miss
  • Kent Myers, Utah State
  • Josh Rosen, UCLA
  • Mason Rudolph, Oklahoma State
  • Cooper Rush, Central Michigan
  • Seth Russell, Baylor
  • Brett Rypien, Boise State
  • Brandon Silvers, Troy
  • Brent Stockstill, Middle Tennessee
  • Zach Terrell, Western Michigan
  • Phillip Walker, Temple
  • Deshaun Watson, Clemson

As far as snubs go, Notre Dame’s DeShone Kizer and/or Malik Zaire feel like pretty big ones. If you’re the type to get upset about preseason watch lists, that is. (Which you shouldn’t be.)

The Manning Award will announce its midseason Watch List additions — which either Kizer or Zaire will be — on Oct. 12, its 10 finalists on Nov. 30, and its winner on Jan. 11.

Watson will attempt to become the first repeat winner in the 12-year history of the award. Previous winners (Matt LeinartTim TebowJohnny Manziel and Jameis Winston) are 0-for-4 in their attempts to repeat.