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San Jose State safety Chad Miller recovering from stabbing in brawl

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San Jose State safety Chad Miller is recovering in a hospital after being stabbed in a fight in San Jose this weekend. Early reports suggest Miller is expected to recover from the injury.

“He is hospitalized and is expected to recover,” a statement from San Jose State said. “Our thoughts and prayers are with Chad and his family for his prompt recovery.”

According to a report from NBC Bay Area, Miller was stabbed in a brawl that involved at least 12 people. The incident occurred off campus from San Jose State, according to The Mercury News. At this time, San Jose police have not commented on the situation and are thought to be investigating the manner. No charges have been filed at this time.

Miller played in all 12 games, starting in three, for the Spartans last season. He recorded 25 tackles and forced a fumble.

Former Oregon RB set to attempt football comeback… at Oregon State

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The next edition of the Civil War could feature a familiar face for fans of both sides of Oregon’s famous rivalry.

Oregonian columnist John Canzano reports that former Oregon Ducks tailback Thomas Tyner is set to return from a medical retirement from football and will instead be headed up the road to Corvallis in order to join Oregon State’s backfield in 2017:

Tyner requested his release from the University of Oregon on Friday. At 9 a.m. on Saturday morning it became official and the former five-star running back who once rushed for 644 yards and scored 10 touchdowns in a single game for Aloha High School prepared to talk with Beavers coach Gary Andersen about playing for OSU next season.

“I’ve wanted to be a Beaver my whole life,” Tyner said.

It seems there’s still plenty to sort out when it comes to the NCAA and becoming eligible for the upcoming season but Tyner seems pretty set on returning to the football field where he once made a name for himself. One of the few five-star prospects to prep in the Beaver State, the running back was a key member of the backfield rotation and rushed for 1,284 yards and 14 touchdowns over two seasons with the Ducks.

Shoulder injuries prevented him from getting back on the field however and it was later announced that he was retiring from the game. It seems the itch to play was just to great though and hence we have this rather interesting comeback attempt at a Pac-12 rival. Canzano notes that Tyner couldn’t play for the Ducks if he wanted because he took that medical retirement and NCAA rules prevent a return, so it’s Beavers or bust in 2017 and beyond for the running back.

If everything does sort itself out eventually and Tyner shows flashes of his former self, he could turn OSU into one of the best backfields on the West Coast. Ryan Nall is already an established, quality starter and he could form a nice thunder-and-lightning tandem with the speedy Tyner for the rebuilding Beavers. Either way, best to circle November 25th on your calendar and tune in for the annual Civil War (in Eugene this year, no less) because it could feature one player who is as intimately familiar with the opponent as he is with his own team.

Rich Rodriguez not overly thrilled with NCAA rule changes

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A bunch of new rule changes are set to take effect this football season, and Arizona head coach Rich Rodriguez appears to be not-so-enthusiastic about some of the key changes. Rodriguez took aim at the new recruiting guidelines that include an early signing period in December and new rules regarding official visits. He was not complimentary, according to quotes provided by the Arizona Daily Star.

“December’s better than February, but it doesn’t solve the problems,” Rodriguez said when reacting to the addition of an early signing period in December. “I still think it makes more sense to have no signing day. I was one that voted against the December one, because I think there should be none.”

Rodriguez has been in favor of having no official signing day and instead allowing student-athletes to sign with a team whenever they are ready to do so. It remains to be seen just how much of an impact an early signing period will truly have on the game, but the expansion of the dates recruits can make official visits (beginning April 1 of recruit’s junior year, ending in late June) could be a negative change for a school’s budget, warns Rodriguez.

“Right now, you’re allowed 56 official visits. We only use 36. So we save the school money,” Rodriguez said of Arizona’s approach to official visits. “You kind of zero in on the guys you know (will come) by the time the official visits come. Now everybody’s going to use 56, because it’s so early in the process. So it’s going to cost schools more money.”

In addition to having concerns about how much schools will spend on additional official visits, Rodriguez also suggests the time is taken away from assistant coaches will take a toll.

“The life of an assistant and the work that they do now is already pretty hectic. Which is OK; they get paid well,” Rodriguez said. “But to have official visits in those months is way too much to ask for kids, coaches and schools. I think it’s a bad idea.”

When the acting president of the American Football Coaches Association comes out with this kind of reaction to the new rules, you cannot help but wonder how many other coaches feel the same way.

Former Florida State center Bryan Stork lands coaching job at Southern Miss

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When he played college football at Florida State, Bryan Stork was one of the top centers in the nation. Now, Stork is embarking on a new journey in college football as an assistant coach. Stork announced this week, via Twitter, he accepted a job offer from Southern Miss to be the new offensive line coach.

Stork was a part of two ACC championship teams at Florida State and the Seminoles team that won the BCS championship in 2014. He became the fifth player to win a college football national championship one year and then the Super Bowl (with the New England Patriots) the next. Though one of college football’s top linemen during his career, his NFL career was forced to be cut short due to injuries and concerns about concussions. In March, Stork announced his retirement from the league after suffering multiple concussions.

Appalachian State extends Scott Satterfield’s contract through 2021

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Appalachian State rewarded head coach Scott Satterfield with a contract extension this week, with the formal approval of the board of trustees making it official. Appalachian State’s contract extension for Satterfield keeps him under the contract through the 2021 season.

“Scott Satterfield continues to take App State football to new heights,” Director of Athletics Doug Gillin said in a released statement. “In four seasons at App State, he has orchestrated one of the most successful transitions to FBS football and continues to build App State football for long-term sustainable success on a national level. Under Scott’s leadership, our football program is 27-5 over the last 32 games, which ranks among the nation’s best.”

Appalachian State shared the Sun Belt Conference championship with Arkansas State last season (the teams had identical conference records and did not play head-to-head for a tiebreaker), and the Mountaineers finished in second place in the Sun Belt with a 7-1 record in 2015 (trailing only undefeated Arkansas State). Appalachian State also finished in third place in the Sun Belt in 2015, their first year in the conference, but were ineligible for postseason play despite a record of 7-5 due to playing in a transition year after making the move up from the FCS. Appalachian State started their first year in the FBS with a 1-5 record that included a home loss to FCS Liberty, but the program then went on a run to close out the season on a six-game winning streak.

Satterfield is pretty much Mr. Appalachain State. The 44-year old coach from Hillsborough, North Carolina got his coaching career underway at Appalachian State in 1998 a few short years after wrapping up his college career with the program as a quarterback. Satterfield played and coached for legendary Appalachian State head coach Jerry Moore and was a part of the coaching staff with the program when the former FCS juggernaut upset Michigan in Ann Arbor in 2007. Satterfield held various assistant coaching roles with the Mountaineers from 1998 through 2008, including wide receivers coach, running backs coach, and quarterbacks coach. He took an opportunity to coach Toledo in 2009 as part of the staff led by former Toledo coach Tim Beckman. After one year with the MAC program, Satterfield headed south to take on the role of offensive coordinator at FIU under former FIU head coach Mario Cristobal, where he worked with wide receiver T.Y. Hilton.

After two seasons at FIU, Satterfield returned home to Appalachian State to be the program’s offensive coordinator in 2012, and he took on the role of head coach the following season for his first head coaching opportunity. Under Satterfield, Appalachian State has completed the transition from the FCS to the FBS as a member of the Sun Belt Conference. In three seasons in the Sun Belt, Appalachian State has played in, and won, two bowl games and had no worse than a seven-win season. Appalachian State has gone 28-10 in its first three years in the Sun Belt.

“Appalachian is home and it continues to be a dream realized to be the head coach at my alma mater, a place at which I have spent most of my life,” Satterfield said in a  statement. If he continues to produce wins at Appalachian State, his name will begin to float around in the rumor mill during coaching carousel season, which is why the contract extension is a comforting piece of news for Appalachian State for now.