Graham Harrell

AP Photo/Bob Leverone, File

56 college football assistants named nominees for 2017 Broyles Award

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College football’s award season is coming quickly with semifinalists and finalists for various awards coming in the next few weeks. Among the awards is the Broyles Award, which recognizes the top assistant coach in college football. Today, the Frank & Barbara Broyles Foundation released its list of nominees for this year’s award. All 56 of them, which is sure to keep more SIDs busy this time of year.

No school has more than one assistant nominated for the award and previous winners of the award from the past five seasons are not eligible. Clemson’s Brent Venables won the award last year, for example, so he is not eligible this season. This list of nominees will be trimmed to 15 semifinalists later this season, and that list will be cut down to five finalists for the award.

The Broyles Award was first awarded in 2010 to Auburn offensive coordinator Gus Malzahn. Malzahn is currently the head coach of the Tigers. In total, five Broyles Award winners have gone on to be a head coach, with four of those currently holding head coaching positions. Pitt head coach Pat Narduzzi (2013, Michigan State defensive coordinator), Texas head coach Tom Herman (2014, Ohio State offensive coordinator), and Oklahoma head coach Lincoln Riley (2015, Oklahoma offensive coordinator) currently hold head coaching jobs. Bob Diaco, who won the award in 2012 while at Notre Dame, went on to be named the head coach at UConn and currently is an assistant with Nebraska.

2017 Broyles Award Nominees

  • Alabama – Brian Daboll, Offensive Coordinator/Quarterbacks
  • Arizona – Rod Smith, Co–Offensive Coordinator
  • Arizona State – Phil Bennett, Defensive Coordinator
  • Arkansas State – Brian Early, Defensive Line Coach
  • Auburn – Kevin Steele, Defensive Coordinator
  • Boise State – Andy Avalos, Defensive Coordinator/Linebackers
  • Bowling Green State – Matt Brock, Special Teams Coordinator/Linebackers Coach
  • California – Beau Baldwin, Offensive Coordinator
  • Central Florida – Troy Walters, Offensive Coordinator
  • Clemson – Tony Elliot, Co–Offensive Coordinator, Running Backs
  • Eastern Michigan – Neal Neathery, Defensive Coordinator/Linebackers Coach
  • FAU – Chris Kiffin, Defensive Coordinator
  • FIU – Brent Guy, Defensive Coordinator/Linebackers
  • Fresno State – Orlondo Steinauer, Defensive Coordinator
  • Georgia – Mel Tucker, Defensive Coordinator
  • Georgia State – Nate Fuqua, Defensive Coordinator/Outside Linebackers
  • Iowa State – Jon Heacock, Defensive Coordinator/Safeties
  • Kansas State – Sean Snyder, Special Teams Coordinator
  • LSU – Dave Aranda, Defensive Coordinator
  • Memphis – Joe Lorig, Special Teams Coordinator; – Outside Linebackers
  • Miami – Manny Diaz, Defensive Coordinator
  • Michigan – Don Brown, Defensive Coordinator/Linebackers
  • Michigan State – Harlon Barnett, Co–Defensive Coordinator/Secondary Coach
  • Mississippi State – Todd Grantham, Defensive Coordinator/Linebackers
  • Missouri – Josh Heupel, Offensive Coordinator/Quarterbacks
  • NC State – Dwayne Ledford, Offensive Line Coach/Run Game Coordinator
  • North Texas – Graham Harrell, Offensive Coordinator
  • Northwestern – Mike Hankwitz, Defensive Coordinator
  • Notre Dame – Mike Elko, Defensive Coordinator
  • Ohio State – Larry Johnson, Assistant Head Coach/Defensive Line Coach
  • Oklahoma – Bill Bedenbaugh, Offensive Coordinator/Offensive Line
  • Oklahoma State – Mike Yurcich, Offensive Coordinator/QBs
  • Ole Miss – Derrick Nix, Running Backs Coach
  • Oregon – Jim Leavitt, Defensive Coordinator
  • Penn State – Brent Pry, Defensive Coordinator/Linebackers Coach
  • San José State – Bojay Filimoeatu, Linebackers Coach
  • SMU – Joe Craddock, Offensive Coordinator
  • South Carolina – Coleman Hutzler, Special Teams Coordinator/Linebackers Coach
  • Southern Miss – Tony Pecoraro, Defensive Coordinator/Inside Linebackers
  • Stanford – Mike Bloomgren, Offensive Coordinator/Offensive Line
  • Syracuse – Brian Ward, Defensive Coordinator/Linebackers Coach
  • TCU – Chad Glasgow, Defensive Coordinator
  • Temple – Jim Panagos, Defensive Line
  • Texas – Todd Orlando, Defensive Coordinator/Linebackers
  • Toledo – Brian Wright, Offensive Coordinator/Quarterbacks Coach
  • Troy – Vic Koenning, Defensive Coordinator
  • U.S. Military Academy – Brent Davis, Offensive Coordinator/Offensive Line
  • USC – Tee Martin, Offensive Coordinator/WR Coach
  • Utah State – Mark Tommerdahl, Special Teams Coordinator/Running Backs
  • Virginia Tech – Bud Foster, Defensive Coordinator
  • Wake Forest – Warren Ruggiero, Offensive Coordinator
  • Washington – Pete Kwiatkowski, Defensive Coordinator
  • Washington State – Alex Grinch, Defensive Coordinator / Secondary
  • West Virginia – Tony Gibson, Associate Head Coach/Defensive Coordinator/Linebackers
  • Western Kentucky – Clayton White, Defensive Coordinator
  • Wisconsin – Jim Leonhard, Defensive Coordinator

Wazzu adds former Leach WR Joel Filani to support staff

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Mike Leach is turning Pullman into Lubbock Northwest in more than just scheme.

Upon his arrival in 2012, Leach employed former Texas Tech wide receiver Eric Morris and wide receivers coach Dennis Simmons to coach the Cougars wideouts. Morris left a year later for the South Plains, and Simmons was hired earlier this month at Oklahoma. So what’d Leach do? Backfill from his roster of former Red Raiders, of course.

Leach promoted former Texas Tech quarterback Graham Harrell from an offensive analyst role to inside receivers coach a week ago, and now he’s filled that spot by hiring former Red Raiders wide receiver Joel Filani as an offensive quality control assistant, which was announced Wednesday.

Filani caught 175 career passes for 2,626 yards and 23 touchdowns, snagging passes from current TCU co-offensive coordinator/quarterbacks coach Sonny Cumbie and his new co-worker, Harrell. He earned All-Big 12 honors in 2005 and 2006.

A sixth-round selection in the 2007 NFL Draft, Filani spent time with the Tennessee Titans, Minnesota Vikings, Seattle Seahawks, Detroit Lions, St. Louis Rams and Tampa Bay Buccaneers. He had spent the past two years as a graduate assistant at Boise State before his appointment in Pullman.

Texas Tech great Graham Harrell named to Leach’s Wazzu staff

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After being a player under Mike Leach, Graham Harrell is now a member of his nine-man coaching staff.

Following up on speculation that had surfaced earlier in the day, Washington State announced that Harrell has been promoted to outside wide receivers coach.  Harrell had spent the 2014 season as an offensive analyst at Wazzu.

Harrell was a record-breaking quarterback at Texas Tech from 2004-08, with Leach as his head coach directing the same Air Raid offense that the pirate-loving coach brought to Pullman.  After his Red Raider days, Harrell spent one season in the CFL (2009) and three with the Green Bay Packers (2010-12) before reuniting with Leach in April of last year.

This marks Harrell’s first job as an assistant coach at any level.

“Graham Harrell is a tremendous young coach and uniquely qualified to fill the role of outside receivers coach at Washington State,” said Leach in a statement. “He has command of the offense from all aspects, is a great teacher and evaluator of talent, and will be a great addition to our staff.”

(Photo credit: Texas Tech athletics)

Report: Mike Leach and Graham Harrell reunited and it feels so good

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Mike Leach and Graham Harrell were meant to be together in the college football universe. Thankfully, on the night of a lunar eclipse, the stars appear to be aligned to bringing these two back together. According to a report by Jacob Thorpe of the Spokesman Review in Spokane, Washington, Leach will add his former Texas Tech quarterback to the coaching staff at Washington State.

Because Washington State already has the NCAA maximum of nine assistant coaches, Harrell’s role with the team will likely fall an administrative title for now. Thorpe suggests an offensive quality control position is a possibility. The staff position has not been confirmed by Washington State, although it may just be a matter of clearing all the paperwork behind the scenes. An announcement could come later this week.

Harrell played for Leach at Texas Tech from 2004 through 2008. During his time at Texas Tech in Leach’s offensive system, Harrell racked up a number of awards and honors including the 2008 Johnny Unitas Golden Arm Award, 2007 Sammy Baugh Trophy and multiple All-America honors. Harrell was also voted the 2008 AT&T All-American Player of the Year in a fan vote. Harrell ended his collegiate career with 15,793 passing yards and 134 touchdowns to 34 interceptions.

On top recruits and non-traditional powers

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Texas Tech landing a verbal commitment from blue-chip quarterback Jarrett Stidham on Friday came as a massive win for Kliff Kingsbury, but it also represented a bit of a trend in recent years.

Stidham isn’t the nation’s No. 1 overall recruit, nor is he rated by Rivals as a five-star prospect. But for Texas Tech, earning the verbal commitment of an in-state quarterback with scholarship offers from Texas and Texas A&M is just about unheard of. Not even Graham Harrell wasn’t offered by Texas or Texas A&M back in 2004.

Consider this, though: In three of the last four recruiting cycles, the nation’s top prep player has gone to a non-traditional power. South Carolina (Jadeveon Clowney), Mizzou (Dorial Green-Beckham) and Ole Miss (Robert Nkemdiche) all landed No. 1-rated, program-altering players in 2011, 2012 and 2013.

Granted, that streak ended this year when Da’Shawn Hand signed his National Letter of Intent to play for Alabama. But in the Rivals era (2002-present), no No. 1 player had gone to a non-traditional power program until Clowney committed to South Carolina. The Gamecocks have had four seasons of 10 or more wins in program history; three came with Clowney on the team.

2015’s No. 1 recruit, defensive tackle Trenton Thompson (Albany, Ga.) seems like a good bet to wind up at a traditional power. But that a good number of these highly-rated recruits, No. 1 or otherwise, are winding up at Ole Miss or Texas Tech or Virginia (which landed 2014’s No. 5 overall recruit) perhaps speaks to the success programs can have in the digital/social media age, making in-roads with high schoolers that weren’t possible 10 years ago.