Joe Mixon

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Better later than never? Joe Mixon holds press conference to apologize for assault of a woman

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Two and a half years after assaulting a woman, Oklahoma running back Joe Mixon has issued a public apology in front of a microphone. In a press conference setting Friday afternoon, Oklahoma head coach Bob Stoops gave Mixon a chance to address the media for the first time regarding his assault of a female student from 2014 a week after the video of the incident was released.

“I’m here basically to apologize to [Amelia Molitor] (the woman struck in the face by Mixon). I apologize to Coach Stoops.I apologize to President [David Boren], the AD, my teammates and most of all my family. I let a lot of people down.” Mixon spent many moments apologizing to his mother throughout the press conference.

Mixon said on multiple occasions during his press conference it is never OK to hit a woman and committed to taking opportunities to speak to kids about violence. Throughout the press conference, Mixon was presented with questions about his being on the team and his future. Mixon remained committed to playing for the Sooners as they prepare to take on Auburn in the Sugar Bowl and suggested he was not thinking about a timeline for any possible decision on the NFL. Mixon was also asked about an incident earlier this season over a parking ticket.

Mixon took responsibility for the incident, saying “It really doesn’t matter what she did (referencing Mixon being contacted first in the incident).”

“I take full responsibility for what I did, Mixon said. “It’s never OK to hit a woman. Never.”

The issue at Oklahoma is disturbing as far as Mixon is concerned, but it is beyond time for leaders at Oklahoma to face the pressure of the media over how Mixon was handled as well. Stoops has done so, saying the punishment to Mixon was not enough at the time, with the hindsight of seeing the video. It is not unprecedented for players connected to similar assault cases to be booted from the program, yet Oklahoma kept him a part of the program and shielded him from media scrutiny along the way until today.

Mixon previously issued a written statement of apology.

Baylor loses Seth Russell as No. 11 Oklahoma remains unbeaten in Big 12

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Anything that could have gone wrong for Baylor (6-3, 3-3 Big 12) on Saturday appeared to go wrong against No. 11 Oklahoma (8-2, 7-0 Big 12). Baylor running back Terrance Williams was knocked out of the game in the first half (he would eventually return though)and quarterback Seth Russell suffered a horrific injury to his left leg in the second half. Injuries aside, Oklahoma left little doubt which team was the best in the Big 12 with a 45-24 victory.

Joe Mixon (124 yards, 1 TD) and Samaje Perine (100 yards, 2 TDs) were dominant on the ground and Baker Mayfield thrived through the air with 300 passing yards and two touchdowns. Dede Westbrook was a big factor for the Sooners as well with two touchdown catches. On defense, linebacker Jordan Evans made some history by becoming the first Oklahoma player to record two sacks and two interceptions in the same game.

Russell left the game with a severe left leg injury. It was a pretty gruesome injury that should keep him out for the remainder of the season. I’ll just put it this way. His foot is not supposed to point that way. You know it was bad when Oklahoma defenders around him on the play were showing how in shock they were about the injury, waving for medics to come rushing out for assistance.

Defense, as you might suspect in a big 12 game, was pretty much optional. Both teams had over 500 yards of offense, but Baylor’s miscues (three turnovers) prevented them from keeping this one closer than it turned out. Two interceptions thrown by Baylor ended up leading to Oklahoma touchdowns. One of those interceptions came in the end zone, for what turned out to a be a pivotal 14-point swing.

With the win, Oklahoma remains in full control of the Big 12 race with two games still to play. The Sooners lead Oklahoma State and West Virginia by one game. It just so happens those are Oklahoma’s final two opponents, starting with next week’s game in Morgantown against West Virginia. West Virginia held on for a 24-20 road win at Texas shortly after Oklahoma wrapped up this win. Oklahoma has won eight straight games since starting the season 0-2 with losses to Houston and Ohio State.

Baylor has now lost three straight game sin Big 12 play and will hope to get back in the win column next week against Kansas State in Waco.

Oklahoma holds off Kenny Hill-fueled rally to beat No. 21 TCU

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The Oklahoma Sooners (2-2, 1-0 Big 12) evened their season record after nearly letting a big lead evaporate in Fort Worth. After taking a 49-24 lead into the fourth quarter, No. 21 TCU (3-2, 1-1 Big 12) made the Sooners sweat with three touchdown drives in the final frame. In the end, Oklahoma managed to keep just ahead of Kenny Hill and TCU to leave town with a wild 52-46 shootout victory.

Baker Mayfield completed 22 of 30 pass attempts for 274 yards and two touchdowns, without an interception. Mayfield also rushed for 55 yards and two more touchdowns, and Joe Mixon led the Sooners with 105 yards and a score. Samaje Perine also rushed for 98 yards and two touchdowns in the win. Dede Westbrook had himself a ball game with five catches for 158 yards and two scores (133 yards and 2 touchdowns came in the first half).

TCU’s fourth-quarter rally came together as Kenny Hill was getting in a groove, although perhaps too late for the Horned Frogs. Hill ended his day with 449 passing yards and five touchdown passes, with Taj Williams responsible for 210 yards and two of those touchdowns. The two teams combined for over 1,000 yards of offense, but TCU lost the game’s only turnover, which led to an Oklahoma touchdown.

Oklahoma got off on the right foot in their Big 12 schedule. After dropping non-conference matchups against Houston and Ohio State in September, the Sooners were effectively removed from playoff discussion after dropping out of the top 25 of the polls as well. This win, however, suggests Oklahoma still has a chance to have a good season as far as the Big 12 is concerned. The conference will be there for the taking this season, and Oklahoma picked up a road win against TCU to get a jump start on the competition on a day Baylor nearly went down at Iowa State and Texas dropped a game against Oklahoma State. West Virginia pulled out a win at home against Kansas State as well.

Oklahoma heads to Dallas next week for the Red River Rivalry meeting with the Texas Longhorns. Texas is coming off a rough loss at Oklahoma State today and defeated the Sooners last season. TCU will hit the road next week by taking on Kansas.

College football players continue to drop footballs voluntarily before crossing the goal line

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There are some things in this world I have grown to accept I may never fully understand. While I may slowly be getting the hang of Snapchat, one thing I feel confident in saying I will never understand is the allure of dropping a football as close to the goal line as one possibly can, which has happened far too often in the world of football, especially college football. It happened twice last night. Fortunately for the guilty parties involved.

Last night, Oklahoma running back Joe Mixon returned a kickoff against Ohio State 97 yards for a touchdown. Of course, the return should have only counted for 96 yards at the most, because video replays showed Mixon dropped the football just before crossing the goal line.

I am a strong advocate for goal-line cameras in every college football game, but you do not even need that to tell Mixon let go of the football before scoring a touchdown. Maybe the refs on the field missed it because they were too slow to keep up with the pace of the kickoff return. Maybe there should always be some sort of official on the goal line to spot these incidents as they occur on long plays. Or maybe the instant replay booth should be taking a look at this. The Big 12 admitted to messing up in the replay booth last week at Oklahoma State. The replay booth at Oklahoma messed this one up too.

But wait! There’s more. If you stayed up for the west coast action last night, you may have seen Cal running back Vic Enwere ran his way for a 54-yard touchdown right up the middle of the Texas defense, seemingly putting the nail in the coffin for the Longhorns in a wildly entertaining offensive shootout in Berkley.  Enwere also dropped the football right before crossing the goal line. This time, however, Texas was aware of the situation and Dylan Haines picked up the loose ball in the end zone, which should have resulted in a touchback for the Longhorns, thus giving Texas an opportunity to tie the game late in the fourth quarter. However, the officials determined there was no immediate recovery and the play had been ruled dead at the one-yard line. Cal was given the football at the one-yard line and the Bears took a knee to run out the clock rather than punch it in for one more score.

Just last week we had another one of these plays happen. Clemson wide receiver Ray-Ray McCloud drop the football right before crossing the goal line against Troy

Somebody please explain to me why football players continue to do this. What is the reason behind it? Has anyone ever given a reason why a player wants to drop the football as soon as they can? I think these players that continue to do this should have a football duct taped to their hands for a week the next time they do it, regardless of whether it hurts their team’s chances at winning or not. Maybe then it will begin to sink in that this just isn’t cool. It could be argued the team should be penalized for a premature celebration by the officials, but no official has gone that far. Maybe they should.

Here is a brief memo to all football players. Scoring touchdowns is cool. Dropping the football before scoring a touchdown is not cool. Stop that. Now.

That said, I look forward to ripping the next college football player who chooses to drop the football before he scores a touchdown in the next week or so.

Judge decides to keep Joe Mixon video sealed

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Surveillance footage of Oklahoma running back Joe Mixon punching a female will remain sealed, a judge ruled Thursday morning according to The Oklahoman. Oklahoma media have asked for the video to be made public as it had been entered in court proceedings last year. However, the video was not presented to the court as evidence by either side of the legal process, thus rendering the video not a part of the official court record. Days later an appeals court ruled the video is a matter of public record, a ruling that was appealed.

What this all comes down to now is still trying to determine if the surveillance video is on public record or not. This legal battle will continue, during which time a black cloud will continue to linger around Norman as the battle to either keep the video private or allow it to go public continues.

Oklahoma president David Boren released a statement following the judge’s ruling, in which he says the university has already punished Mixon on their end.

“At the University of Oklahoma we feel strongly about setting the proper standards of conduct,” Boren’s statement opened. “Joe Mixon has received punishment for what he has done. At the same time, we are an educational institution,  where we hope that young people will learn from their mistakes and chart a better future course. Joe has met all of the conditions of his punishment, which include not playing on the football team for one year and maintaining good grades and a clean record of behavior.”

Mixon was suspended for the entire 2014 season by Oklahoma, which was recommended by Bob Stoops and Vice President for Athletics Joe Castiglione. Mixon returned to the Sooners program in 2015 and was a part of the power running game the Sooners used on offense en route to a Big 12 championship and spot in the College Football Playoff.

Last September members of the Oklahoma media got a chance to watch the surveillance video, yet it had not been released to the public.