Kolby Listenbee

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Former TCU player sues TCU, Big 12 for alleged abuse and harassment

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Kolby Listenbee, a former wide receiver at TCU, has filed a lawsuit taking aim at the university and Big 12 for alleged abuse and harassment he claims never allowed him to fully recover from an injury that may have impacted his professional career outlook in the NFL. In the lawsuit, Listenbee mentioned TCU head coach Gary Patterson and former offensive coordinator Doug Meachum in accusing the members of the football coaching staff of pressuring him to get back on the field as quickly as possible.

TCU has not specifically commented on the lawsuit, which is the standard operating procedure for any university in this situation, but did issue a brief statement saying the school “takes pride in its long-standing tradition of excellence in providing a positive experience for its student-athletes, especially in the areas of care, prevention and rehabilitation of athletic injuries,” per The Star-Telegram in Fort Worth, Texas.

Per Listenbee’s lawsuit, the former Horned Frog claims he injured his pelvic bones in a game against SMU in 2015. The injury involved torn cartilage that is said to take a minimum of six months to rehab. Listenbee claims members of TCU’s training staff injected him with pain medications and steroids to ease the pain and allow him to continue playing. The pain meds and what Listenbee claims to be a “lack of rest and abuse from the coaching staff” eventually led to having to have metal plate inserted in his bone, which effectively hurt his chances of getting off to a successful NFL career.

Listenbee was drafted in the sixth round of the 2016 NFL draft by the Buffalo Bills after previously suffering a groin injury at the NFL Scouting Combine. Listenbee was waived by the Bills a year later due to ongoing injury concerns. Listenbee later signed with the Miami Dolphins in October 2016 and was again waived in early December. A week later, Listenbee signed with the Indianapolis Colts to be on the practice squad, where he currently is under contract as a reserve.

The lawsuit also takes aim at the Big 12 for what Listenbee claims to be a failure to review TCU’s compliance with NCAA rules and policies regarding injury practices.

TCU receiver Echols-Luper moves to defense

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TCU wide receiver Cameron Echols-Luper will have a new role on the team in 2015. TCU head coach Gary Patterson revealed Saturday Echols-Luper will be moving to t he defensive side of the football in 2015, with the transition starting this spring.

Echols-Luper played cornerback in high school, and Patterson noted his size and speed being a good fit for the position for TCU’s defense next season.

The move to cornerback also should give Echols-Luper more playing time on the field as well. The Horned Frogs should be pretty set at wide receiver next season with the returns of juniors Josh Doctson, Kolby Listenbee and Deante’ Gray and sophomore Ty Slanina. All four were among the team’s leading receivers in 2014. Echols-Luper managed just nine receptions for 72 yards in 2014.

TCU is losing senior defensive back Kevin White, and adding Echols-Luper figures to help the depth at the position whether he wins the starting job or not. However, hopes are high he can step right into filling big shoes on that side of the football.

With offense just Peachy, Frogs defense suffocating Rebels

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How dominant has TCU been in the first half of the Chick-fil-A Peach Bowl vs. Ole Miss?  Let me count the ways, if for nothing more than the benefit of the College Football Playoff committee.

In rolling out to a 28-0 lead that must seem double that to the other side, the Horned Frogs did something that only two teams this season, Auburn and Arkansas, were able to accomplish against the Rebels defense: score more than 20 points in a game, and they’ve done it in just two frenetic quarters of play.  The most points they’ve given up in a single game this season, 35 in the loss to Auburn, is certainly in jeopardy.

There were trick plays aplenty for Gary Patterson‘s offense, with one of them, a double-pass, leading directly to a 31-yard touchdown pass from wide receiver Kolby Listenbee for the first points of the game.  Trevone Boykin, who continues to astound as one of the most improved players in the country at any position, completed 16-of-22 passes for 98 yards and a touchdown.  He added 38 yards on the ground, but did throw two really bad interceptions.

It was TCU’s defense, though, that was the most impressive of the first half for either side.

Ole Miss was limited to just 68 yards of total offense in the first half, including five yards rushing on 20 carries.  Quarterback Bo Wallace was turned into Really, Really, Really Bad Dr. Bo, completing 5-of-13 passes for 63 yards and three of interceptions, the last of which was a “pick-six.”

Wallace was sacked five times, and nearly a sixth late the second quarter that would’ve resulted in a safety.  And nearly a seventh on the same series on a play that, instead of a safety, resulted in a Wallace pass from the end zone being intercepted in the end zone by defensive lineman James McFarland for a touchdown.  You could state, and would not get an argument from me, that it was the single ugliest interception in the history of the sport of football.

But wait, there’s more.  Ole Miss managed just four first downs, and was 2-9 on third down conversions.  Two of those first downs, as well as 41 yards of offense and both third-down conversions, came on the last drive of the half.  And one of the sacks taken by Wallace knocked the Rebels out of field-goal range at the end of that drive.

Adding proverbial insult to literal injury — standout offensive lineman Laremy Tunsil went down with what looked like a severe leg injury — was this…

Yes, it’s been that kind of a half for Ole Miss.

Big plays, turnovers push No. 10 TCU to 37-20 halftime lead over Texas Tech

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Texas Tech had done it. More than a quarter into their visit to No. 10 TCU and already trailing 24-17, the Texas Tech defense had forced its first punt.

Facing a fourth-and-7 from the Texas Tech 38, Gary Patterson pulled out a fake punt, and Red Raider defender Justis Nelson was flagged for interfering with Josh Doctson on a pass by punter Ethan Perry that may or may not have been catchable. One play later, Trevone Boykin found Deante’ Gray for a 24-yard touchdown pass and TCU grabbed a 31-17 lead.

It’s been that kind of day as the Horned Frogs and Red Raiders have combined for 84 snaps, 30 first downs, 655 yards from scrimmage and 57 points as TCU leads 37-20 at the break.

Aside from a defense that has obviously struggled to stop the Horned Frogs’ offense, Davis Webb hasn’t the cause much with one interception and two lost fumbles – on Texas Tech’s last two possessions of the half – leading to 13 TCU points.

Trevone Boykin has missed on nearly half his passes (14-of-27) but made his completions count, going for 199 yards and three touchdowns. The big play combination of Kolby Listenbee and Josh Doctson have combined for six grabs for 137 yards and two touchdowns, and Aaron Green has added six rushes for 105 yards and a touchdown.

Webb has posted good numbers, 14-of-26 passing for 286 yards and two scores, but negated much of it with his trio of giveaways. DeAndre Washington has found space in the middle of TCU’s defense, rushing eight times for 64 yards with a long of 48, while Webb’s two touchdown passes have come on plays of 57 (to Kenny Williams) and 56 (to Devin Lauderdale) yards.

After scoring 10 points in the game’s first three minutes and 12 seconds and 17 in the first quarter, the Red Raiders managed only a 38-yard Ryan Bustin field goal in the second quarter.

TCU will receive the ball to open the second half.

Bonkers on the Brazos: No. 5 Baylor’s comeback stuns No. 9 TCU, 61-58

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On the 216th and final snap, No. 5 Baylor notched the 21st and final score of a four-and-half hour game to take its first and final lead, a 28-yard Chris Callahan field goal as time expired to give the Bears a 61-58 win over a stunned No. 9 TCU squad.

Before we talk about how Baylor won the game, we first must talk about how they nearly lost it. TCU stormed out of the gate by forcing a turnover on downs on Baylor’s first possession, immediately responding with a 35-yard touchdown pass from Trevone Boykin to Kolby Listenbee, then forcing a Shock Linwood fumble, and capitalizing on the turnover with a 3-yard B.J. Catalon scoring dash to take an early 14-0 lead.

Baylor spent the rest of the evening playing catchup, pulling to a 24-24 tie only to immediately allow a 94-yard kickoff return for a touchdown by Catalon, then pulling within four at 31-27 and 34-30 only to watch the Horned Frogs take control of the game with a 24-7 run over a seven-and-a-half minute span in the late third and early fourth quarters. Marcus Mallet gave TCU a 58-37 lead with 11:38 to play by stepping in front of a Bryce Petty pass and taking it 49 yards for a touchdown.

From that moment forward, the Baylor offense never left the field without a score, and its TCU counterparts seemingly loaded the bus for Fort Worth.

The comeback started one minute later as the Bears scored in only four plays, punctuated by a seven-yard Devin Chafin touchdown run. Exactly four minutes later, Petty hit Antwan Goodley for his second touchdown of the game, this one from 28 yards out and pulling the Bears to within 58-51 with 6:39 remaining.

After a TCU three-and-out (with two passes), Baylor raced 91 yards in five plays, with Petty hitting Corey Coleman from 25 yards out to tie the game with 4:42 to go.

Memo to future opponents: all Baylor needed to erase a 21-point deficit was 14 plays and three minutes and 21 seconds of all possession (and, of course, a willing accomplice in the TCU offense.)

With the game tied at 58-58, TCU moved to midfield but was forced to punt when faced with a 4th-and-8. Then the Bears were flagged for having 12 men on the field, and after two timeouts and what felt like 15 minutes of real time, Gary Patterson elected to go for it on a 4th-and-3 from the Baylor 45. Boykin’s pass to Josh Doctson.

Baylor then took over at its own 45 with 1:11 to play and, after moving to the TCU 43, was seemingly faced with its own 4th down decision after a Petty pass fell incomplete, but Corry O’Meally was flagged for pass interference on a strikingly similar play to the one on TCU’s final possession that did not draw a flag.

Five plays later, Callahan knocked in a 29-yarder and thousands of green and gold faithful rushed the field.

No 61-58 game is without controversy, and Patterson’s decision to eschew the punt on 4th-and-3 and the no-call/call pass interference decisions will live in Baylor-TCU infamy, a series that now stretches 110 games and saw Baylor take a 52-51-7 lead.

Petty simultaneously trashed and resurrected his Heisman Trophy campaign after completing 28-of-55 passes for 510 yards with six touchdowns and two interceptions while adding 10 rushes for 23 yards. Linwood rushed 29 times for 178 yards, and Bears receivers Goodley, Coleman and K.D. Cannon combined for 22 receptions for 426 yards and five touchdowns.

Boykin hit 21-of-45 passes for 287 yards with a touchdown with 45 rushing yards, but Catalon was the Frogs’ standout with 48 rushing yards and two touchdowns, 71 receiving yards and the 94-yard kickoff return touchdown.

The win undoubtedly puts Baylor in the drivers’ seat for the Big 12 title and a College Football Playoff berth, but also sets up another possible three-way tie scenario with TCU beating Oklahoma, Baylor beating TCU and Oklahoma beating Baylor in Norman on Nov. 8, but that’s a worry for another day. The Bears first must focus on their trip to West Virginia on Saturday.

TCU, meanwhile, will look to pick up the pieces of 85 shattered hearts before No. 16 Oklahoma State comes to Fort Worth on Saturday.