Seth Doege

QB Brewer expected back soon for Texas Tech

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Texas Tech coach Kliff Kingsbury said on Monday that injured quarterback Michael Brewer should be back practicing with the team soon.

Brewer, a sophomore, aggravated a back injury early in fall camp and has been out ever since. He played in nine games last year and was considered the favorite to replace Seth Doege heading into the fall. 

Walk-on freshman Baker Mayfield grabbed the starting job in the meantime and has performed well, completing 66 percent of his passes for 1,120 yards and eight touchdowns as the Red Raiders have jumped out to a 4-0 record. Davis Webb, another freshman, has also seen time at quarterback.

Kingsbury said that once Brewer is healthy, he’ll have a chance to win the starting job.

“I definitely think when he gets healthy, we’ll see what he’s got. It’s been a long layoff for him, but he’s a talented kid and a talented player,” he said. “I would imagine if he could come back in pretty good form and pretty good shape, we’ll get him right back in the mix.”

It doesn’t seem to matter who the quarterback is at Tech, since that guy will put up numbers regardless, but a healthy Brewer might be the best long-term option for the program. He has the most experience under his belt and looked sharp in his appearances last season. As good as Mayfield has been, he has slowed down the last two games, throwing four interceptions and just one touchdown. With the meat of the Tech schedule coming up, Brewer’s improved health may be just what the doctor ordered.

CFT Predicts: the Big 12

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As the 2013 season draws near, we peek into our crystal ball and guess project how each of the five major conferences will play out. Today, we examine the Big 12. 

While we’re at it, be sure to check out our other conference predictions: SECBig TenPac-12

1. TCU (Last year: 7-6; lost to Michigan State in Buffalo Wild Wings Bowl) 
What happened last season?
Thanks to injuries, dismissals and attrition of various varieties, the Horned Frogs tossed a lot of young players into their first Big 12 fire and still managed to win seven games. Included in the list of new faces was quarterback Trevone Boykin, who played out the final two months of the season while Casey Pachall dealt with substance abuse issues. Of all the success Gary Patterson‘s had in Fort Worth, 2012 may have been was his best coaching job, and a young defense buckled down in the final month of the season.

So why are they picked here?
Most of them youngins mentioned above are back. The offense should be fine no matter which quarterback, Pachall or Boykin, takes the field. And they’ll have options at their disposal too. Running back Waymon James averaged nearly 10 yards per carry in two games before going down with a season-ending knee injury. In that vein, TCU’s backfield had its fair share of injuries, but when healthy, it should flourish alongside a solid receiving unit.

And that defense? It should be the best in the conference with just about everybody coming back (minus linebacker and second-leading tackler Joel Hasley).

Anything else?
Some departures just before, and around the start of, preseason camp have put a dent in the offensive line and linebacker units. Defensive end Devonte Fields will miss some early-season action as well. But Patterson is well-respected around these parts and he’s shown as recently as a year ago that he can coach around injuries. Also, the Horned Frogs have some intriguing road games at Oklahoma (Oct. 5), Oklahoma State (Oct. 19) and Kansas State (Nov. 16) that should provide tough tests. Going to Lubbock in the early portion of the season (Sept. 12) and Ames in November (Nov. 9) aren’t always picnics, either.

2. Texas (last year: 9-4; beat Oregon State in Alamo Bowl)
What happened last season?
Texas experienced about as many ups and downs as a nine-win team could possibly go through in one season. The Longhorns got taken to the woodshed (again) by Oklahoma and still couldn’t find a way to beat Kansas State, but a come-from-behind win against Oregon State in the Alamo Bowl cleansed the football palate just enough to make the offseason bearable. The offense, led by quarterback David Ash, was inconsistent and the defense exhibited too many breakdowns in fundamentals and tackling. 

So why are they picked here?
That’s a handsome question considering there wasn’t a lot praise being doled out in the 2012 recap. But the simple answer is Texas brings back among the most experienced group of starters not just in the Big 12, but in the country. There’s no denying the skill position talent on offense, where receivers Mike Davis and Jaxon Shipley should be complemented by the deepest backfield in the conference. If the defense can improve even a little — getting Jordan Hicks back should help — this team has the potential to be dangerous.

Anything else?
Yeah, about that Mack Brown. Two BCS championship appearances (and winning one) would normally eliminate Brown from being mentioned as a concern, but media members in Big 12 country didn’t seem to have a lot of confidence in him when they picked Texas to finish fourth in the conference this year. I’m a little more convinced Texas will ascend to the top, or near the top, of the Big 12, which should be wide open this year. But if Brown can’t make it happen this year, it’s hard to see him hanging around much longer.

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Late comeback lifts Texas Tech over Minnesota

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Six years ago, Texas Tech needed what was the biggest comeback in bowl history to beat Minnesota in the Insight Bowl 44-41 in overtime. The Red Raiders’ rally over Minnesota in the Meineke Car Care Bowl of Texas Friday night wasn’t quite as large, but nevertheless dramatic.

The Gophers led the Red Raiders 31-24 with just over one minute remaining in the game when TTU wide receiver Eric Ward caught a 35-yard pass from quarterback Seth Doege as part of a seven-play, 82-yard drive. Minnesota ran just three plays on its next possession before D.J. Johnson intercepted Philip Nelson and returned the turnover 41 yards to the Gopher 22-yard line. Two plays later, kicker Ryan Bustin made a 28-yard field goal as time expired.

Minnesota had a superb ground game with 222 yards rushing and a pair of touchdowns. Nelson wasn’t particularly efficient for the Gophers with just seven completions on 18 attempts for 138 yards, but he had a couple of scoring passes as well. The late interception, as one can imagine, was costly.

It was also an especially chippy game. Texas Tech alone had 13 penalties for 135 yard and there were 20 penalties for 220 yards between the two teams. Of those 20 penalties, nine were personal fouls with the two sides going at each other more than a couple of times after the whistles blew.

The 34-31 win was Texas Tech’s third straight bowl victory while Minnesota is still looking for its first bowl victory since the 2004 Music Bowl over Alabama. Still, Jerry Kill is doing a tremendous job in Minneapolis and this program is showing improvement under his watch. This heartbreaking loss is going to be tough to carry through the offseason, but there’s no doubt Kill has UM headed in the right direction.

On the other side, Texas Tech is looking forward to the beginning of the Kliff Kingsbury era in Lubbock. Kingsbury replaces Tommy Tuberville, who surprisingly left for Cincinnati earlier this month.

Predictions 101 — Meineke Car Care Bowl of Texas

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Minnesota vs. Texas Tech
Fri., Dec. 28 – 9 p.m. ET, ESPN
Houston – Reliant Stadium

There ain’t much momentum headed to Houston.

After a fortuitous start, Minnesota (6-6) has won only two games since Sept. 22. (If you correctly guessed that those victories came at the expense of Purdue and Illinois, you do not deserve a prize.)

Similarly, Texas Tech (7-5) opened 4-0 before starting to slide. The Red Raiders wrapped up the regular season by losing four of the their final five, which is actually worse than it sounds since that lone victory down the stretch was a 41-34 overtime affair at home against Kansas (1-11).

Just about the only thing that would make this matchup watchable is if history were guaranteed to repeat itself.

At the 2006 Insight Bowl, the Golden Gophers spectacularly squandered a 38-7 lead in a 44-41 overtime loss to the Red Raiders.

The prospect of the current Minnesota squad putting 38 points on the board is extremely remote. The punchless Gophers have scored more than 17 points only four times this season (against UNLV, New Hampshire, Western Michigan and Purdue).

Texas Tech, which will be led by interim coach/offensive line coach Chris Thomsen, has its own set of issues, but scoring isn’t one of them. The Red Raiders average 37.8 points per game, powered by the precise passing of Seth Doege.

Opening point spread: Texas Tech by 13

The pick: Texas Tech 37-19

Click HERE to get predictions for the remaining bowl games.

Predictions 101 — Week 9

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There we were, sitting as pretty as pretty can be. Six games already nestled comfortably in P101’s bag, half of which were upsets.

We really didn’t need to pull off a clean sweep. We’d be as proud of 6-1 as Maria Sharapova. And any “player” worth his salt would have hedged his way into the winner’s circle, turning the Florida State-Miami game into an exercise to see how much gravy could be found.

But there we were, watching the Hurricanes do more than hold their own. The pregame smoke and the first quarter mirrors had them up 10-0 … a good thing in our book. We knew what was coming.

It came … and the Seminole margin was oh so sweet in the fourth quarter. That is until the entire gridiron became four-down territory for Miami, which led to a touchdown being gifted to FSU with 2:45 remaining.

The Seminoles led, 33-13, and we’re dealing with opening lines (+17.5) here at P101, not closing ones (+21). So, we were sunk. The Hurricanes still had a couple minutes to work with, but they weren’t going to kick a field goal and hadn’t mounted a touchdown drive since a meager 22-yarder within the first four minutes of the game.

But Brent & Herbie seemed to share some belief, cheering Miami on down the field. They giggled while mentioning “interested mathematicians” a couple times along the way.

Sure enough, the Hurricanes went 75 yards in eight plays and got the job done.

Yes. Finally. Last week, we went 7-0 straight and 7-0 versus “the number.” Holy Toledo (thank you, Rockets), 14-0!

Oh well … on to this week, where we can only go down from here.

TOP 5 GAMES OF THE WEEK (Thurs., Oct. 25, thru Sat., Oct. 27)

1) No. 3 Florida vs. No. 12 Georgia (at Jacksonville, Fla.)
Sat., Oct. 27 — 3:30 p.m. ET, CBS

If South Carolina players were to judge this fight, there’s no question who they’d predict as winners. Two weeks after they hosted and routed Georgia, 35-7, the Gamecocks got roughed up at Florida, 44-11.

Too bad the transitive property doesn’t apply to college football. If it did, we could just call for a 61-point Gator victory and be done with it.

All that aside, Florida does hold a clear edge in this game.

Despite the fact that Georgia had the most fun at the last “Cocktail Party,” winning 24-20, the Gators have dominated this rivalry for more than a couple decades, taking 18 of the last 22. And this one doesn’t seem to match up well for the Bulldogs.

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