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The 10 best and 10 worst bowl matchups, as ranked by F/+

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2016’s most even bowl matchup will happen in El Paso, Texas, while the most lopsided game will take place in Boise, Idaho.

Those on-paper analyses are based on the end-of-the-season F/+ rankings, which are explained here on Football Outsiders. Personally, they’re a go-to for getting a rough idea of how good a certain team is, so why not use them to preview the best and worst bowl matchups?

Here are the 10 best games based on how close the two participants’ F/+ rankings are:

Sun Bowl (+1): No. 25 Stanford vs. No. 26 UNC
Fiesta Bowl (+2): No. 2 Ohio State vs. No. 4 Clemson
Rose Bowl (+2): No. 7 USC vs. No. 9 Penn State
Sugar Bowl (+2): No. 8 Auburn vs. No. 10 Oklahoma
Armed Forces Bowl (+2): No. 51 Louisiana Tech vs. No. 53 Navy

Peach Bowl (+4): No. 1 Alabama vs. No. 5 Washington
Quick Lane Bowl (+4): No. 93 Boston College vs. No. 97 Maryland
New Mexico Bowl (+5): No. 81 New Mexico vs. No. 86 UT-San Antonio
Citrus Bowl (+6): No. 5 LSU vs. No. 11 Louisville
Cotton Bowl (+10): No. 12 Wisconsin vs. No. 22 Western Michigan

Obviously, the two College Football Playoff games (Ohio State-Clemson, Alabama-Washington) are among the closest, but it’s good to see three of the four other New Year’s Six bowls in here as well. The Orange Bowl (No. 2 Michigan vs. No. 13 Florida State) just barely missed the cut.

As for the 10 biggest mismatches:

Famous Idaho Potato Bowl (+71): No. 29 Colorado State vs. No. 100 Idaho
Birmingham Bowl (+61): No. 33 South Florida vs. No. 94 South Carolina
Military Bowl (+54): No. 18 Temple vs. No. 72 Wake Forest
Cactus Bowl (+52): No. 14 Boise State vs. No. 66 Baylor
Miami Beach Bowl (+45): No. 44 Tulsa vs. No. 89 Central Michigan

Arizona Bowl (+38): No. 49 Air Force vs. No. 87 South Alabama
Las Vegas Bowl (+30): No. 20 Houston vs. No. 50 San Diego State
Poinsettia Bowl (+27): No. 30 BYU vs. No. 57 Wyoming
Heart of Dallas Bowl (+26): No. 85 Army vs. No. 111 North Texas
Russell Athletic Bowl (+25): No. 15 Miami vs. No. 40 West Virginia

It’s not surprising three of these games involve top-level Group of Five teams (South Florida, Temple, Boise State) playing 6-6 Power Five teams (South Carolina, Wake Forest, Baylor), given that’s where a lot of bowl mismatches can take place. It was a little surprising to see the gulf between Houston and San Diego State be so significant, though.

But while these matchups may either be close or lopsided, always remember the ironclad rule of bowl season: Weird stuff is gonna happen. One team may not care while the other does, one team may not deal with the elements (especially in the northern bowls) as well as the other, or one team may come in with something to prove while the other team doesn’t. The best-case scenario for us college football fans is that every game is interesting and worth watching, no matter what the on-paper numbers may say.

Former Colorado State RB Treyous Jarrells explains why he quit football for marijuana

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The Coloradoan has a fantastic story up on former Colorado State running back Treyous Jarrells, who stopped playing football so he could continue to use marijuana (which is legal in the state of Colorado but a banned substance for Colorado State student-athletes).

Before rushing to judgment, read the whole story in which Jarrells makes some good points about pain management, painkiller abuse and just the general ridiculousness of how weed is viewed.

He entered his first season at CSU in 2014 with lingering ailments, though he never showed it. Playing running back for 16 years, dating back to Pop Warner football in Florida, took a toll on Jarrells’ knees. A 2015 surgery to repair a torn meniscus helped, but the pain never went away. His body ached.

Concerns about addiction to narcotic prescription painkillers and the long-term side effects of over-the-counter remedies such as acetaminophen led Jarrells to self-medicate. He’d done so since high school.

It was a calculated risk to use marijuana, but Jarrells said had he not, he wouldn’t have been able to endure the pain football caused.

Read the whole story here.

Jarrells, who rushed for 478 yards and six touchdowns in his college career, said he quit the team so he wouldn’t be subjected to drug testing that could’ve put his scholarship at risk. He graduated from CSU and now operates a grow room in Colorado.

S. Illinois announces additions of four FBS transfers, including ones from Florida, K-State

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When Southern Illinois takes the field in 2016, their roster will have a decidedly FBS look to it.

In a press release Monday, the FCS football program announced that it has added four former FBS players to the team.  Those four are wide receiver Deionte Gaines (Colorado State), cornerback CJ Jennings (Wyoming), running back Jarvis Leverett, Jr. (Kansas State), and wide receiver Ryan Sousa (Florida).

All four of those players will be eligible to play in 2016. Jennings and Sousa will have three years of eligibility remaining; Gaines will have two; and Leverett one.

Originally a Florida State commit, Sousa was a three-star member of the Gators’ 2014 recruiting class, rated by 247sports.com as the No. 67 receiver in the country and the No. 70 player at any position in the state of Florida. In addition to UF and FSU, Sousa also held offers from, among others, Arizona, Georgia Tech, Indiana, Kentucky, Michigan State, Missouri, UCLA and Wisconsin.

After taking a redshirt as a true freshman, Sousa played in two games in 2015. The fact that Sousa was a depth-chart afterthought after two springs in Gainesville likely played a sizable role in the player’s decision to transfer last month.

Despite being at K-State the past four years, Leverett played in just five games for the Wildcats.  He rushed for 67 yards on 20 carries, all of which came during the 2014 season.

As a redshirt freshman last season, Jennings played in 10 games. Exiting the spring, Jennings was one of the Cowboys’ starting corners before announcing his decision to transfer earlier this month.

Gaines started five of the 22 games in which he played the past two seasons prior to a mid-May decision to transfer from the Rams. He caught 22 passes for 181 yards and a touchdown, and added another 153 yards and two touchdowns on 14 carries.

As a true freshman in 2014, the 5-8, 180-pound Gaines led the Mountain West and was 20th in the FBS with 672 kick return yards on 28 returns (24.0 average).

WR Deionte Gaines won’t return to Colorado St., will transfer

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Not so unexpectedly, Colorado State will head into the summer and then on into the fall with a thinned receiving corps.

During spring practice, Mike Bobo confirmed that Deionte Gaines was not a part of the team at the moment at the moment, although the CSU head coach certainly didn’t slam the door shut on the junior’s return to the Rams.  Friday on social media, however, Gaines did the slamming as he announced on Instagram that he “will not be attending CSU next year and will be continuing my football career elsewhere.”

There’s no word yet on just where the elsewhere might be for the Orlando native.

Gaines started five of the 22 games in which he played the past two seasons. He caught 22 passes for 181 yards and a touchdown, and added another 153 yards and two touchdowns on 14 carries.

As a true freshman in 2014, the 5-8, 180-pound Gaines led the Mountain West and was 20th in the FBS with 672 kick return yards on 28 returns (24.0 average).

Nevada takes inaugural Arizona Bowl from Colorado State

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If a bowl game is streamed over the Internet and played between two conference foes, did it really happen?

Yes, and Nevada has the trophy to prove it.

The Wolf Pack claimed the inaugural Nova Home Loans Arizona Bowl from Mountain West bunkmate Colorado State, 28-23 in Tucson on Tuesday night.

Nevada (7-6) was guided by the ground efforts of James Butler, who rushed 24 times for 189 yards and two touchdowns, including a four-yard burst that put the Wolf Pack on top with 1:06 remaining. Butler’s first score came on a 77-yard jaunt that nudged Nevada to a 13-7 lad with 6:38 left in the first half. Colorado State answered Butler’s touchdown with a field goal, but Elijah Mitchell returned the ensuing kickoff 96 yards for a touchdown to stake Nevada to a 19-10 lead.

Colorado State (7-6) scored 13 of the next 16 points, notching a 29-yard Wyatt Bryan field goal just before the break, a nine-yard Jasen Oden, Jr., run that pulled the Rams to within 22-20 with 3:55 left in the third quarter, and another Bryan field goal that gave Colorado State a 23-22 lead with 3:40 to play in the game.

Colorado State had a chance to re-take the lead one last time after Nevada’s final score, moving to the Wolf Pack 21 with nine seconds remaining, but Rams receiver Jordon Vaden failed to get out of bounds after a nine-yard reception with no timeouts remaining.

Nick Stevens led Colorado State with 310 passing yards on 22-of-42 passing and one rushing score. Izzy Matthews led the Rams’ rushing game with 87 yards on 12 carries.

Tyler Stewart completed 6-of-13 passes for 74 yards for Nevada while rushing six times for 29 yards.

The win gives Nevada its first bowl victory since a Colin Kapernick-led Wolf Pack took down Boston College in the 2011 Kraft Fight Hunger Bowl.

Colorado State and Nevada became the first conference mates to meet in a postseason game since LSU and Alabama squared off in the 2012 BCS National Championship — though, unlike that game, these teams did not meet in the regular season. Tonight’s game represented just the 14th all-time meeting between the Rams and Wolf Pack; Colorado State holds an 11-3 lead.