Report: NCAA rule breakers could face NFL sanctions

7 Comments

Warning: slippery slope ahead.

For those who are unaware, the NFL announced Thursday that former Ohio State quarterback Terrelle Pryor is eligible for their supplemental draft that will be held this coming Monday.  One caveat: he will be suspended for the first five games of the NFL’s regular season, and will not be permitted to participate in either practice or games until the suspension is completed.  The reasoning behind the suspension, the NFL stated in its release, was that “Pryor had accepted at the end of the 2010 college football season a suspension for the first five games of the 2011 season for violating NCAA rules”, and that he had subsequently “undermine[d] the integrity of the eligibility rules for the NFL Draft” by “failing to cooperate with the NCAA” on their investigation into the OSU football program.

Based on one report, it appears the NFL may be hellbent on making such a thing the new norm when it comes to players bringing their college baggage into the pros.

Mike Freeman of CBS Sports.com writes that the NFL, “in conjunction with college football and the NFL Players Association, is considering a series of actions that would discipline players who are busted in college for violating NCAA rules, then skip to the pros unscathed.”  This will henceforth, of course, be known as the Reggie Bush Rule if adopted and survives what would certainly be a legal challenge by a player or players.

The punitive measures the NFL is considering, Freeman reports, include fining or suspending players who were found to have committed NCAA violations after they came to the NFL.  Any fines collected would go toward paying a school’s legal fees incurred by defending allegations of violations or to a scholarship fund.

In recent months, members of the NCAA, NFL, NFLPA and AFCA have all met to discuss ways they can help college football curb what appears to be escalating rule-breaking at that level.  Certainly the NCAA would be open to any and all help it can get, while the NFL will undoubtedly bend over backwards — how far as evidenced by the Pryor decision — to maintain their free farm system.  The AFCA, whose members consist of college football coaches, are also likely open to anything that would make it easier for their constituency to compete on a level playing field.

The NFLPA, however, may be a tougher nut to crack when it comes to cooperating for the good of the college game.  While the player’s association would have no problem in lending a hand with the agent/runner issue that still plagues the college game, they might buck at its membership being penalized by the NFL for something that occurred while in college.  Freeman, though, reports that the NFLPA is open to the dialogue currently being offered up by the NFL and the NCAA on this issue; how open the NFLPA may be is reflected by the fact the they reportedly signed off on Pryor’s suspension.

Even if the NFLPA hurdle is navigated, there could very well be legal obstacles to overcome.  In fact, there most certainly would be legal challenges.  While I applaud the NFL for its gesture, even as it’s far from altruistic, there appears to be a very slim chance this could ever come to fruition.

Of course, if the NCAA had subpoena power, none of this grandstanding by The Association’s football big brother would be necessary, but that’s another story for another day.

I do have one question, though: would the same standards that the NFL wants to apply to players also apply to coaches?  Let’s say, purely hypothetically of course, a coach were to abandon a Southern California college football program six months before near-historic sanctions were levied for a head-coaching job with a professional football club in the Northwest; would he be subject to the same type of NFL-mandated punishment as his players?

One would have to think that the NFL would most certainly want to hold its coaches to a higher standard than its players, right?

Ah yes, a slippery slope indeed…

Tulane extends Willie Fritz through 2023

Getty Images
Leave a comment

Major news on the Kansas football front came down the pike Tuesday when Tulane announced it has extended head coach Willie Fritz through 2023.

Wait, what? Let’s back up a bit.

Kansas fired AD Sheahon Zenger on Monday, citing that a “change in leadership is necessary” because “progress in key areas has been elusive.” While Kansas chancellor Douglas Girod did not come out and say this move was related to football, he did feel the need to mention head coach David Beaty in his release announcing Zenger’s firing. “In addition, earlier today I spoke with Coach Beaty and shared my expectation that he will continue recruiting hard and getting his team ready for the season,” Girod said.

It doesn’t take Leonardo DiCaprio to read Girod’s thoughts here. Beaty is 3-33 in three seasons as KU’s head coach, including a 1-26 mark in Big 12 play. Coaches that average a win a year don’t typically last until Year 5. Just last year, Nebraska cleared out its AD so the new AD could fire the existing football coach and hire a new one, and it appears Kansas is headed down the same path later this year.

With Beaty apparently on his way out, I tweeted on Monday where Kansas should direct its incoming search.

Fritz-to-Kansas makes sense on a number of levels. Fritz is a proven program builder, a more-with-less guy that won at Blinn Junior College, Central Missouri, Sam Houston State, Georgia Southern and, now, Tulane. Overall, Fritz is 202-89-1 with two junior college national titles and conference championships in three separate leagues — all at places that have no business posting a collective .693 winning percentage. Simply put, Kansas is the rebuild job of the century, and there is not a more proven general contractor than Fritz.

And even better for Kansas, Fritz seems likely to take the job. He’s a Sunflower State native and at an age — 58 — where he’d likely take any Power 5 job offer that came his way, lest it be the last one.

All that said, it did not seem a coincidence that Tulane announced an extension for Fritz on Tuesday, who is 9-15 in two seasons with the Green Wave.

“I couldn’t be more excited with the direction in which our football program is headed,” Fritz said in a statement. “It is an absolute joy to coach at this institution. We have total buy-in from everyone on our staff to our administration, and I know we have a bright future.”

With Tulane being a private school, financial terms were not disclosed, but the key number will be the buyout.

Of course, Fritz could also pass on a potential Kansas offer. Or he may not get an offer. Or the job may not open at all. But even the prospect of an offer has already turned into a win for him.

DB Craig Watts leaves USF, lands at Div. II school

Getty Images
Leave a comment

With transfer season in full swing, South Florida is the latest to see its roster sustain a bit of attrition.

Craig Watts took to his personal Twitter account Monday to reveal that he will be transferring from Charlie Strong‘s USF program.  The defensive back also posted a photo of him signing paperwork for Valdosta State, indicating a move to the Division II school.

As he’s dropping down a couple of levels, Watts, who’ll be a redshirt sophomore in 2018, will be eligible to play immediately this coming season.

After coming to the Bulls as a three-star recruit on 247Sports.com‘s composite board, Watts took a redshirt as a true freshman.  He played in 12 games last season and was credited with five tackles.

Nevada’s Devin Porter arrested for failure to appear

Getty Images
Leave a comment

After a dozen days, it’s time to, once again, flip the switch on a “Days Without An Arrest” reset.

The latest to do the off-field deed is Devin Porter, with the Reno Gazette Journal reporting that the Nevada linebacker was arrested over the weekend for failure to appear.  The redshirt junior had been scheduled to appear in court for a traffic citation.

From the Gazette Journal‘s report:

The charge is a misdemeanor. If a defendant skips a court date, a judge can issue a bench warrant for their arrest. If 30 days pass before a defendant surrenders himself, an additional charge for “failure to appear” can be issued. The maximum sentence for such issue includes four years in prison and/or $5,000 in fines, although both are rare.

Porter was issued a $415 bail, which he posted and was released.

Porter is a walk-on to the Wolf Pack football program who has yet to see any game action for the Mountain West Conference school.  According to the newspaper, “[h]is brother, Cliff, was a starter at left guard for Nevada as a sophomore last season before graduating early and giving up the rest of his eligibility.”

(Tip O’ the Cap: ArrestNation.com)

Reports indicate Florida State starting RT Josh Ball could be suspended for all of the 2018 season

Getty Images
1 Comment

Florida State’s offensive line may have been dealt a rather significant blow a couple of months before summer camp kicks off.

In November of last year, reports surfaced that Sandra Sellers, an FSU student who dated Seminoles football player Josh Ball for a year and a half, had accused the offensive lineman of dating violence, including allegations that he physically attacked her on at least three occasions.  Tuesday, Warchant.com reported that, in connection to those allegations, Ball has been suspended from the university after a ruling by the school’s judicial panel.

At this point in time, it’s unclear how long Ball’s suspension will last.  According to a since-deleted social media post made by the alleged victim, however, Ball will miss the entire 2018 season.

From the Tallahassee Democrat:

Sellers posted to her public page on social media that she was happy the matter was concluded and that she will now be able to enjoy football season because she will not see Ball on the field.

“This long journey has finally come to an end!” Sellers wrote in the post that has since been deleted.

“After two long days of testifying and two agonizing weeks of waiting for this letter, it’s finally here. Thank you FSU for making campus a better place. Stand up for yourself and stand strong. God doesn’t put you through obstacles that you can’t learn and grow from.

“Thank you to all my family, friends and amazing boyfriend for having to hear about all these cases over and over again and consistently standing by me in my decision to continue to pursue charges. So cheers to finally being able to close this chapter of my life for good and to being able to enjoy football season, and not seeing him on the field!

Warchant.com notes that “Ball was not charged by the Tallahassee Police or the state attorney’s office following Sellers’ complaint” in connection to the allegations.

As of yet, neither the university nor the athletic department has confirmed Sellers’ version of Ball’s status with the team. Sellers’ attorney Leonardo Arias Vera told the Democrat he could not comment on the situation.

Ball started the last nine games of the 2017 season at left tackle for the Seminoles.  Exiting spring practice this year, and with last year’s starter Rick Leonard no longer around due to expired eligibility, the redshirt sophomore was penciled in as FSU’s starting right tackle.