Knight Commission wants grad rates to affect BCS revenue distribution

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If all goes according to plan, the BCS committee will leave Hollywood, Fla., today with two or three final postseason options to take back to their respective conferences for further discussion.

The consensus seems to be that a four-team playoff (or, “event”, if you’re weird like that) that continues to incorporate the current bowl sites is the preference. The logistics of a playoff, on the other hand, is far from concrete.

One area yet to be determined is revenue distribution under the new BCS model, which again, should take effect in 2014. Thanks to a report obtained by CBSSports and Brett McMurphy, the Knight Commission on Intercollegiate Athletics has sent out a proposal to the 11 Division 1-A commissioners, their member presidents and BCS executive director Bill Hancock recommending that the revenue distribution be determined based on academic standards.

Here’s a basic rundown:

The Knight Commission proposed three payout models -– a proposed graduation success incentive fund sorted by NCAA football graduation rate. The Commission’s preferred model divides the football programs into three categories: Tier I (graduation rates of at least 70 percent), Tier II (graduation rates between 60 and 69.9 percent) and Tier III (graduation rates below 60 percent). 

In the commission’s preferred model, Tier I and Tier II schools would evenly split 50 percent of the new media rights revenue with the remaining revenue split among the Tier I schools. The Tier III schools would not receive any revenue. See the breakdown here. 

Based on the projected amount of the new media rights deal ($360 million), under the Commission’s model Tier I schools would each receive $6.34 million, Tier II schools would each receive $2.1 million and Tier III schools would receive nothing – but embarrassment for their sub-par graduation rates.

Pac-12 commissioner Larry Scott called the proposal “noble”, and in theory I would agree, but it’s important to point out that 34 programs identified as Tier III (the graduation rates provided were from 2001-04) would have been cut off from revenue produced by the new postseason format.

Conference commissioners just aren’t going to agree to anything that could potentially deny one of their members a slice of the media rights pie.

David Beaty releases statement on firing of KU AD Sheahon Zenger

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Kansas fired athletics director Sheahon Zenger earlier today. If the move was immediately greeted as a vote of no-confidence in Zenger’s ability to find and hire the next Jayhawks football coach — and, thus, a vote of no-confidence in the David Beaty era — that’s because it pretty much is.

“But Athletics continues to face a number of challenges, and progress in key areas has been elusive. To achieve the level of success we need and expect, I have determined a change in leadership is necessary,” KU chancellor Douglas Girod said in his statement announcing Zenger’s firing.

The playbook is well documented by now: to replace the head coach, you must first replace the AD who hired the head coach, and the replacement will then hire the new head coach. We’ve seen it play out at a number of places, most recently Nebraska, where Bill Moos was brought in to replace Shawn Eichorst, and Moos promptly fired Mike Riley and hired Scott Frost.

Beaty is a well-liked coach, but college football is a results business and a 3-33 record speaks for itself. Beaty surely knows that score better than anyone.

Hours after the news went public, Beaty released a statement of his own on Monday afternoon.

As if the 3-33 mark wasn’t obvious enough, the beginning of the end of the Beaty era likely came on Monday.

Alabama (still) a massive favorite over Louisville, other Week 1 lines

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It’s been about four months since we checked in on the Week 1 betting lines in college football, highlighted by Alabama’s installation as a massive favorite for its date with Louisville in Orlando.

And in the four months since, the public has clearly lost faith in the Nick Saban Football Machine.

After starting as a 29.5-point favorite, Alabama has been downgraded… to a 28.5-point favorite, according to lines released by Bet Online.

Other lines of note:

  • UCF (-20.5) at Connecticut
  • Northwestern (+4.5) at Purdue
  • Colorado (-6) vs. Colorado State (at Denver)
  • San Diego State (+14.5) at Stanford
  • Florida Atlantic (+23) at Oklahoma
  • Oregon State (+38) at Ohio State
  • Texas (-10.5) at Maryland
  • Boise State (-10.5) at Troy
  • Arizona (-14) vs. BYU (at Phoenix)
  • Auburn (-3.5) vs. Washington (at Atlanta)
  • Ole Miss (-1.5) vs. Texas Tech (at Houston)
  • West Virginia (-7) vs. Tennessee (at Charlotte)
  • North Carolina (+6) at California
  • Michigan (+2) at Notre Dame
  • Alabama (-28.5) vs. Louisville (at Orlando)
  • Miami (-3) vs. LSU (at Dallas)
  • Virginia Tech (+6.5) at Florida State

Check out the entire list of lines here.

Royal Wedding barely beats CFP title game in TV ratings

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In case you didn’t already know, allow me to be the first to tell you there was a Royal Wedding over the weekend. The audience interested in watching Prince Harry wed Meghan Markel had next to nothing in common with those interested in watching Alabama and Georgia play football, but it turns out the two groups are nearly the exact same size.

According to a tweet by Front Office Sports, the Royal Wedding stands as the eighth most popular viewing spectacle of 2018 to date at 29.2 million viewers, just edging out the College Football Playoff Championship’s 28.4 million viewers.

Another similar dynamic played out when This Is Us‘s finale (on NBC!) nudged out Georgia’ Rose Bowl comeback over Oklahoma — 27 million to 26.9 million — for the No. 12 spot to date.

The good news here is that there shouldn’t be another Royal Wedding for, oh, another 25 years or so, so the 2019 CFP title game should have less competition for the No. 8 spot moving forward.

Former WKU offensive lineman will finish career with “Brohmsquad”

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Western Kentucky offensive lineman Dennis Edwards says he is going to finish his college football career with the same coach he started it with. In a message posted on Twitter, Edwards announced he will reunite with head coach Jeff Brohm, now at Purdue.

As a graduate transfer, Edwards will be eligible to play immediately this fall, which will be a nice boost to the depth at the offensive line position for Purdue. Unless he changes position, however, Edwards will likely be a backup center to provide depth. Kirk Barron returns to anchor the center of the line, one that loses just one starter from a year ago. But for a program that is still in the early stages of a rebuilding plan under Brohm, padded the depth on the offensive line can be instrumental in the sustained success for the program.