Penn State gets fined, postseason ban, scholarship reduction

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Penn State received penalties from NCAA president Mark Emmert this morning.

It’s not the Death Penalty, but as previously speculated, some of the sanctions might as well be. Emmert said in a follow-up press conference that the decision was not negotiated as previously believed.

Without any further delay, here are the penalties. The Big Ten is also set to announce additional sanctions against Penn State later this morning

1) A $60 million fine, the funds of which go to external programs for child abuse. According to the NCAA, that amount “cannot come at the expense of non-revenue sports or student-athlete scholarships.”

2) A four-year postseason ban.

3) All wins from 1998-2011 will be vacated (111 wins). Joe Paterno is no longer major college football’s winningest.

4) A reduction of 10 initial and 20 total scholarships each year for a four-year period. This will drop the limit of offered scholarships per year to 15 and cap the total number of scholarships to 65.

5) Five years probation with a monitor.

6) The NCAA can investigate the program further after criminal proceedings.

Additionally, Penn State athletes may be allowed to transfer wherever they like without penalty. NCAA is considering waiving scholarship limit for schools that accept PSU transfers as well, so the Association is really bending over backward for the athletes here.

Here’s the press release from the NCAA this morning:

By perpetuating a “football first” culture that ultimately enabled serial child sexual abuse to occur, The Pennsylvania State University leadership failed to value and uphold institutional integrity, resulting in a breach of the NCAA Constitution and rules. The NCAA Division I Board of Directors and NCAA Executive Committee directed Association president Mark Emmert to examine the circumstances and determine appropriate action in consultation with these presidential bodies.

“As we evaluated the situation, the victims affected by Jerry Sandusky and the efforts by many to conceal his crimes informed our actions,” said Emmert. “At our core, we are educators. Penn State leadership lost sight of that.”

According to the NCAA conclusions and sanctions, the Freeh Report “presents an unprecedented failure of institutional integrity leading to a culture in which a football program was held in higher esteem than the values of the institution, the values of the NCAA, the values of higher education, and most disturbingly the values of human decency.”

As a result, the NCAA imposed a $60 million sanction on the university, which is equivalent to the average gross annual revenue of the football program. These funds must be paid into an endowment for external programs preventing child sexual abuse or assisting victims and may not be used to fund such programs at the university.

The sanctions also include a four-year football postseason ban and a vacation of all wins from 1998 through 2011. The career record of former head football coach Joe Paterno will reflect these vacated records. Penn State must also reduce 10 initial and 20 total scholarships each year for a four-year period. In addition, the NCAA reserves the right to impose additional sanctions on involved individuals at the conclusion of any criminal proceedings.

The NCAA recognizes that student-athletes are not responsible for these events and worked to minimize the impact of its sanctions on current and incoming football student-athletes. Any entering or returning student-athlete will be allowed to immediately transfer and compete at another school. Further, any football student-athletes who remain at the university may retain their scholarships, regardless of whether they compete on the team.

To further integrate the athletics department into the university, Penn State will be required to enter into an “Athletics Integrity Agreement” with the NCAA. It also must adopt all Freeh Report recommendations and appoint an independent, NCAA-selected Athletics Integrity Monitor, who will oversee compliance with the agreement.

Effective immediately, the university faces five years of probation. Specifically, the university is subject to more severe penalties if it does not adhere to these requirements or violates NCAA rules in any sport during this time period.

“There has been much speculation on whether or not the NCAA has the authority to impose any type of penalty related to Penn State,” said Ed Ray, Executive Committee chair and Oregon State president. “This egregious behavior not only goes against our rules and Constitution, but also against our values.”

Because Penn State accepted the Freeh Report factual findings, which the university itself commissioned, the NCAA determined traditional investigative proceedings would be redundant and unnecessary.

“We cannot look to NCAA history to determine how to handle circumstances so disturbing, shocking and disappointing,” said Emmert. “As the individuals charged with governing college sports, we have a responsibility to act. These events should serve as a call to every single school and athletics department to take an honest look at its campus environment and eradicate the ‘sports are king’ mindset that can so dramatically cloud the judgment of educators.”

Penn State fully cooperated with the NCAA on this examination of the issues and took decisive action in removing individuals in leadership who were culpable.

“The actions already taken by the new Penn State Board of Trustees chair Karen Peetz and Penn State president Rodney Erickson have demonstrated a strong desire and determination to take the steps necessary for Penn State to right these severe wrongs,” said Emmert.

Minnesota new home for Michigan transfer Benjamin St-Juste

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Benjamin St-Juste may have left Ann Arbor, but he hasn’t left the Big Ten.

Taking to Twitter Tuesday night, St-Juste announced that he will be continuing his collegiate playing career at Minnesota.  As a graduate transfer, the cornerback is eligible to play immediately for the Golden Gophers in 2019.

Not only that, but St-Juste will have two more years of eligibility after this season as he graduated from his previous school in less than two-and-a-half years.

In late March, Michigan confirmed that St-Juste, who dealt with hamstring issues last year, had decided to medically retire from the sport.  A little over a month later, the cornerback took to social media to announce that, instead, he would be entering his name into the NCAA transfer database while also disputing that he had retired from playing football as U-M had originally claimed.

A four-star 2017 signee, St-Juste was the No. 39 cornerback in the country coming out of high school in Canada.  After playing in 12 games as a true freshman, the 6-3, 196-pound corner didn’t see the field at all due to the hamstring issue.

Mizzou QB Shawn Robinson alleges mistreatment at TCU in appeal for immediate eligibility

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In early 2018, Kolby Listenbee, a former wide receiver at TCU, filed a lawsuit taking aim at the university and Big 12 for alleged abuse and harassment he claims never allowed him to fully recover from an injury that may have impacted his outlook for a playing career in the NFL.  Earlier this month, that lawsuit was settled.

Nearly three weeks later, TCU is back in the headlines with additional, albeit vague, mistreatment allegations.

According to the Fort Worth Star-Telegram, Shawn Robinson, who transferred from TCU to Missouri late last year, has filed an appeal with the NCAA that would grant the quarterback a waiver for immediate eligibility in 2019.  The waiver claims Robinson was the victim of unspecified mistreatment during his time with the Horned Frogs; “TCU is contesting the grounds that waiver is supported on,” the Star-Telegram wrote.

The Kansas City Star further adds that TCU is not expected to object a favorable ruling for Robinson, but “is determined to defend itself against Robinson’s accusations.”

Regardless of what happens during Robinson’s appeal process, Mizzou will head into the summer portion of the 2019 offseason with Kelly Bryant, a transfer from Clemson, firmly entrenched as the Tigers’ starter under center.  If Robinson’s appeal is successful, though, he would provide a veteran presence as the backup should something happen to the starter.

Robinson, who has another year of eligibility he can use in 2020 irrespective of the appeal, completed nearly 61 percent of his passes this past season for 1,334 yards.  He averaged just 6.5 yards per attempt, though, and had nine touchdowns versus eight interceptions in his 204 attempts.

South Carolina in play for Clemson transfer RB Tavien Feaster

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This would certainly add a little bit of spice to the annual Palmetto Bowl if it were to come to fruition.

Late last month, and amidst rumors of a potential departure, Clemson confirmed that Tavien Feaster had entered the NCAA transfer database and was looking to continue his collegiate playing career at somewhere other than the home of the defending national champions.  Speaking to the Charleston Post and Courier this week, Feaster acknowledged that Clemson’s in-state rival, South Carolina, is one of a handful of schools that have shown interest.

“They are recruiting me like most teams. Obviously, they want to talk to me and see where I’m at with everything,” Feaster told the Post and Courier. “That’s really how it’s been with everybody. Everybody is seeing where my head is and where I’m at with everything. But, I look at it (USC) as a place that’s providing me with an opportunity to better myself and better my future.

“I haven’t really looked at it from a fan’s aspect because that’s not my job and that’s not what I’m doing it for. That doesn’t really matter to me. What really matters to me is that I go to a place that’s going to use me and play me in the way that I need to be played.”

It had previously been reported that Power Five programs such as Alabama, Mississippi State, Oklahoma, Texas and Virginia Tech had already been in touch with the running back since he entered the portal.  East Carolina has shown interest as well.

Feaster has not yet taken any visits to potential landing spots, and won’t make a decision on his football future until he’s had a chance to take trips to various campuses.

If he follows through with the transfer — the back has the option of pulling his name from the portal — Feaster would finish the Clemson portion of his playing career with 1,330 career rushing yards and 15 touchdowns on 222 carries, as well as 183 receiving yards and one touchdown on 23 receptions.  The Spartanburg, SC, native, who ran for 11 yards on three carries in the Tigers’ title game win over the Crimson Tide, started 11 of the 41 games in which he appeared for the Tigers.

In the Tigers’ 63-9 win over the Gamecocks last season, Feaster ran for 63 yards and a touchdown on nine carries.  In three career games against the SEC’s USC, The back carried the ball 21 times for 117 yards and a pair of scores.  He also caught three passes for another 19 yards.

As a grad transfer, Feaster would be eligible to play immediately at another FBS school.  The upcoming season will be the back’s final year of eligibility.

2020 three-star CB prospect Joshua Ancrum killed in shooting

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Yet again, a young man with the rest of his life ahead of him has had it snuffed way too early.

Citing multiple sources, 247Sports.com confirmed Tuesday night that Joshua Ancrum, a Class of 2020 football recruit, was killed in a shooting earlier that day.  The details of what led to the tragedy have not yet been divulged.

In a tweet posted early Tuesday evening, Ancrum’s 7-on-7 team mourned the high school junior’s passing.

A three-star cornerback, Ancrum held offers from Bowling Green, FIU, Southern Miss and USF. “That list was likely to grow, thanks to his strong showing at The Opening Miami,” 247Sports.com wrote. “Ancrum was named the MVP of the defensive backs at the camp with a couple of interceptions.”

Our thoughts, prayers and condolences go out to all of those impacted by Ancrum’s senseless and tragic death.