BYU pulls away from streaking Aztecs, claims Poinsettia Bowl

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San Diego State entered the 2012 bowl season tied with Arkansas State for the fourth-longest winning streak in the country at seven games in a row, behind a trio of teams (Notre Dame, Ohio State and Northern Illinois) with 12-game streaks.

In rather ugly fashion, that streak has come to a screeching halt.

Thanks in large part to a dazzling and dominating defensive performance from Kyle Van Noy, BYU pulled away late to stake its claim to a 23-6 win over the Aztecs in the (deep breath) San Diego County Credit Union Poinsettia Bowl.  The game, the third of the 2012-13 bowl season, featured nearly as many combined turnovers/punts (eight/15) as points.

It was, though, the fourth straight bowl win and sixth overall for the Cougars under head coach Bronco Mendenhall.

The latest postseason victory for Mendenhall was tied directly to both Van Noy and a wild 17-second sequence early in the fourth quarter.  With BYU trailing 6-3 and its offense showing no signs of life, Van Noy strip-sacked Aztecs quarterback Adam Dingwell in the end zone and, for good measure, recovered the fumble for a touchdown and a 10-6 lead with 12:37 left in the game.  On SDSU’s first play from scrimmage following that turnover, Van Noy forced another Dingwell fumble that was recovered by teammate Jordan Johnson.

One play later, a Jamaal Williams‘ 14-yard touchdown run — the extra point was missed — pushed the lead to 16-6 with 12:20 remaining.

As if to rub more salt in the Aztecs’ gaping wound, Van Noy intercepted a Dingwell pass six minutes later and returned it 17 yards for his second defensive touchdown of the quarter.  For the game, the junior linebacker was credited with nine tackles, 1.5 sacks, one forced fumble, one fumble recovery and one blocked punt to go along with his two scores.

Suffice to say, Van Noy was the overwhelming choice for game MVP honors for the Cougars, which finished their eighth season under Mendenhall at 8-5.

The loss kept San Diego State from the football program’s first 10-win season since 1977 as the Aztecs finished their final season in the Mountain West at 9-4.  Next season, the Aztecs, along with fellow MWC member Boise State and a handful of Conference USA teams, will join the Big East.  Probably.

NCAA data shows number of graduate transfers in football nearly doubled last year

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The biggest issue the NCAA is tackling at the moment is an easy one to pick out: transfers. Coaches have chimed in about potential changes and new rules have been enacted but even as we approach the Media Days portion of the calendar next month, transfer talk has been one of the hot topics across all major sports at the collegiate level.

Perhaps that interest is one reason why the NCAA released a new study this week looking into the numbers of one particular category of players: graduate transfers. While the number of actual graduate transfers remains relatively low (about 1% of the total number of student-athletes), the number itself continues to skyrocket year-by-year as more and more players take advantage of rules that allow them to graduate and play immediately at their next school.

According to the NCAA, that number of grad transfers is five times bigger in 2017 than it was in 2011 for men’s sports alone and football in particular saw the number of players moving around nearly double from 117 total in 2016 to 211 the following season. The rates are higher in men’s basketball but the overall number is naturally much bigger in football given the vastly bigger roster size.

Data for 2018 was naturally not made available since we’re just in the middle of the year but a similar increase wouldn’t be too surprising to see given the number of big names that have made headlines prior to the upcoming season. That includes players like Michigan’s Wilton Speight (to UCLA), Cal’s Tre Watson (to Texas), Notre Dame’s Jay Hayes (to Georgia) and Alabama’s Brandon Kennedy (to Tennessee) all among those taking the grad transfer route. It seems like nearly every week we see one or two players announce their intentions to take a similar path.

While we might not have 400+ players listed as graduate transfers in football when 2018 comes to a close, it certainly doesn’t appear that this trend will be slowing down anytime soon and the coaches that are complaining about this brand of “free agency” in college football will just have to get used to the new reality of player movement in light of a number of new NCAA reforms on the subject.

Notre Dame LB David Adams stepping away from football for medical reasons

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Tough news out of South Bend this week as redshirt freshman linebacker David Adams is leaving the Notre Dame football program as a player to take a medical exception. He tweeted a lengthy statement discussing the departure on his Twitter account Tuesday night:

The Pittsburgh native was a former three-star recruit coming out of high school and was an Under Armour All-American. He redshirted during his first year with the team in 2017 but will sadly not suit up for the team going forward.

The list of injuries Adams tweeted about shows why this isn’t super surprising news given that he had suffered, among other things, concussions, a torn left labrum, a torn rotator cuff, a knee injury and severe patellar tendonitis. He will remain on scholarship at Notre Dame but won’t count against the football team’s 85-man limit going forward.

Though Adams was expected to help contribute some depth to the Irish defense this year, the team is pretty set in the middle of their defense at linebacker on the two-deep but could see incoming recruits Jack Lamb and Bo Bauer take some snaps earlier than expected if somebody else gets hurt.

Former Tennessee AD John Currie reportedly one of three in running for Maryland AD job

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It didn’t take that long to hear John Currie’s name mentioned for another Power Five gig.

The former Kansas State athletic director who memorably was run out of the same position in Knoxville following a messy coaching search at Tennessee has reportedly made the cut at Maryland and will be interviewed as one of three finalists at the school. Per the Baltimore Sun’s Don Markus:

Former Terps AD Kevin Anderson had taken a six-month sabbatical late last year from the position but eventually resigned in early April to formally vacate the job. Evans has been acting as athletic director ever since Anderson’s departure and has been with the school since 2014. That figures to give him a bit of a leg up on the other two candidates and it doesn’t hurt that he also has previous AD experience from his time at Georgia from 2004 to 2010, even if the ending was not the one he wanted in Athens.

As for Currie, his name being a finalist is notable given the messy divorce he had at Tennessee that saw him earning $75,000 a month during a paid suspension that he was placed on after nearly hiring Mike Leach to become the next Vols football coach. He formally split with the university in March (with a nice $2.5 million check) and has been lecturing at various schools ever since.

It remains to be seen which direction Maryland eventually goes but it seems pretty clear that the school isn’t going for an under the radar hire given the names on their shortlist.

Mike Riley reportedly leaving Oregon State to join spring football league in San Antonio

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Next spring you may very well be able to see a former San Antonio Gunslinger-turned-Pac-12 coach across the sidelines from a former San Antonio Rider turned-Pac-12 coach… in San Antonio.

If you’re throughly confused or don’t know the semi-pro teams that have operated in the state of Texas over the years, the former would be referring to new Alliance of American Football head coach Rick Neuheisel and the latter is referring to Mike Riley, who according to longtime NFL reporter and current SiriusXM host Alex Marvez is apparently leaving his gig as an assistant at Oregon State to be a head coach again with a new AAF franchise.

Riley re-joined the Beavers coaching staff this offseason as assistant head coach and tight ends coach, helping out his former QB Jonathan Smith in Corvallis after he was let go from Nebraska. His third stint on the sidelines for OSU does not appear to be a lengthy one based on this report though it’s possible he could coach the upcoming 2018 season with the team before going to Texas since the AAF does not start until February of 2019 as a unique new spring league.

The move does mark a return to San Antonio for Riley, who has spent plenty of time in the area over the years and was once the head coach of the Riders (a World League of American Football team) for two seasons in 1991 and 1992. Interestingly enough, that first coaching staff had now-Wisconsin head coach Paul Chryst on it and saw current Dallas Cowboys head coach Jason Garrett become the starting quarterback.

Oregon State has not confirmed Riley’s departure or his temporary replacement if there is one but one figures to hear more details at a press conference for the AAF tomorrow.