Miami NOA delayed as NCAA investigates itself

32 Comments

No, seriously.  This is actually happening.

Two weekends ago, a report surfaced that the NCAA would be issuing a Notice of Allegations to the Miami Hurricanes in connection to  improper benefits involving both the football and basketball programs.  That issuance was expected as early as a week ago Monday; since that report, there’s been nothing but crickets chirping as far as the ear could hear.

Today, we now know why the Notice of Allegations has been delayed, and the reasons behind the delay paint the NCAA in an even more negative light than it already has been over the past few years.

In a press release, the NCAA announced that its “national office has uncovered an issue of improper conduct within its enforcement program that occurred during the University of Miami investigation.”  In other words, the NCAA violated NCAA bylaws in its investigation of an NCAA member.  The genesis for the improper conduct seems to stem almost solely from documents obtained by the NCAA from bankruptcy proceedings involving Nevin Shapiro, the former UM booster who allegedly lavished millions of dollars in impermissible benefits on Hurricane football (mainly) and basketball players.

From the release:

Former NCAA enforcement staff members worked with the criminal defense attorney for Nevin Shapiro to improperly obtain information for the purposes of the NCAA investigation through a bankruptcy proceeding that did not involve the NCAA.

As it does not have subpoena power, the NCAA does not have the authority to compel testimony through procedures outside of its enforcement program. Through bankruptcy proceedings, enforcement staff gained information for the investigation that would not have been accessible otherwise.

As a result of misconduct on the part of his enforcement staff — conduct that he says “angered and saddened” him — president Mark Emmert confirmed that the NCAA “will not move forward with a Notice of Allegations against Miami until all the facts surrounding this issue are known.”

An external review of the NCAA’s enforcement program has been commissioned by Emmert.  Kenneth L. Wainstein, a partner with the law firm Cadwalader, Wickersham & Taft LLP, has been retained by the NCAA and will be charged with conducting “a thorough investigation into the current issue as well as the overall enforcement environment, to ensure operation of the program is consistent with the essential principles of integrity and accountability.”

Emmert hopes that the review will be completed in a period of 7-10 days.

“Trust and credibility are essential to our regulatory tasks,” said Emmert.  “My intent is to ensure our investigatory functions operate with integrity and are fair and consistent with our member schools, athletics staff and most importantly our student-athletes.”

Regardless of how long this external review takes, it’s yet another delay in an investigation that’s more than two years in the making.

Shapiro first came to the NCAA’s attention in August of 2010, with reports surfacing that the convicted felon was writing a tell-all book in which he was alleging former Hurricane players had committed major NCAA violations.  In August of the next year, the NCAA’s investigation became public knowledge; a Yahoo! Sports report that same month had Shapiro claiming he spent “millions of dollars” on six dozen UM student-athletes, with the benefits ranging from “cash, prostitutes, entertainment in [Shapiro’s] multimillion-dollar homes and yacht, paid trips to high-end restaurants and nightclubs, jewelry, bounties for on-field play (including bounties for injuring opposing players), travel and on one occasion, an abortion.”

In February of 2012, Shapiro, apparently agitated that nearly four dozen individuals connected to The U were lined up to testify against him in his federal trial, promised to take “that program down to Chinatown” and that the Miami story will become “an urban legend” before it’s all said and done.

Shapiro was ultimately sentenced to 20 years in prison for orchestrating what was in the neighborhood of a $1 billion Ponzi scheme.  The damage outside the courtroom, though, had already been done.

Miami has already self-imposed a bowl ban each of the past two seasons in an attempt to soften potential NCAA sanctions, although it was holding off on self-imposing scholarship reductions and other punitive measures for the time being.  How this latest revelation by the NCAA will affect a Notice of Allegations — if there even is one — remains to be seen.

Per the NCAA, a NOA is sent to notify a member institution that enough evidence exists that major violations have occurred and that The Association is moving forward in the process.  Some have asked whether misconduct on the part of the investigative staff will result in some sort of a “mistrial” for Miami’s case.

“It’s premature to answer that question,” Emmert said on a conference call Wednesday, adding, “this is a shocking affair.”

If/when Miami receives its NOA from the NCAA — Emmert said during the conference call that information obtained surreptitiously was a very small part of the case and would be “thrown out” — they will have 90 days to respond.  Following that response, UM will appear in front of the Committee on Infractions to answer the allegations.  Typically 6-8 weeks thereafter, the NCAA will issue its findings and any sanctions will be revealed.

Arizona State TE transfer Jared Bubak is headed home to Nebraska

Nebraska football
Getty Images
Leave a comment

After a series of losses this offseason, Nebraska is on the positive side of a football roster move.  And it involves a local boy for good measure.

Jared Bubak began exploring the possibility of leaving Arizona State earlier this offseason.  Over the weekend, the tight end revealed on Twitter that he will be transferring into the Nebraska football team.  Interestingly, he’ll be joining the Cornhuskers as a walk-on.

Because of that, and the fact that he is an ASU graduate, he’ll be eligible to play for the Big Ten school this coming season.

Bubak is a native of Lincoln, Neb.  He actually committed to Nebraska before flipping to Arizona State football.

“After speaking with the coaching staff, I have decided to finish my last year of eligibility with the University of Nebraska as a walk-on,” Bubak wrote. “This transfer portal process has solidified how important the state of Nebraska is to me and my family.  The chance to come back home and play for Coach [Scott] Frost was an easy decision for me and I’m excited to represent the people of Nebraska.

“I just didn’t want to be living with that what-if,” said Bubak in explaining his decision to the Lincoln Journal Star. “What if I had gone to Nebraska? So I always knew for my last year I wanted to come back home and see what happens.

Bubak was a three-star 2016 signee for the Sun Devils.  He was the No. 2 player in the state of Nebraska regardless of position.

The 6-5, 242-pound Bubak appeared in 17 games during his time at ASU.  Seven of those appearances came a season ago.  He didn’t catch a pass during his time in Tempe, although he did return one kick.  For minus-four yards.

At least 13 scholarship Cornhuskers who have left the program for one reason or another this offseason.  Included in those are:

Additionally, three walk-on offensive linemen have left as well.

Hawaii adds North Texas transfer WR Rico Bussey

Hawaii football
Getty Images
Leave a comment

North Texas’ loss is a win for the Hawaii football program.  Unofficially, of course.

In February, North Texas’ Rico Bussey Jr. made his way into the NCAA transfer database.  Three months later, the wide receiver used his Twitter machine to announce he is headed to the Hawaii football team.

Thus far, the Rainbow Warriors have not confirmed Bussey’s addition to the team.

Bussey will be eligible to play for the Hawaii football team in 2020.  This will be the receiver’s final season of eligibility.

A torn ACL prematurely ended Bussey’s 2019 campaign in mid-September last year.  Because he played in four or fewer games, he was able to take a redshirt.  That saves a year of eligibility that he’ll now use at the Mountain West Conference school.

Two seasons ago, Bussey led the Mean Green in receptions (68), receiving yards (1,017) and receiving touchdowns (12).  Prior to the serious knee injury in 2019, Bussey had 150 yards and a touchdown on five catches this year.

All told, Bussey accounted for 1,941 yard and 21 touchdowns on 128 receptions during his time in Denton.  He also returned a pair of kickoffs for a combined 78 yards.

Bussey was a two-star member of the Class of 2016 for UNT.  The Oklahoma native was rated as the No. 32 player regardless of position in the Sooner State.

Bussey will be coming to a Hawaii football team that will be under new management. In mid-January, Nick Rolovich left to take over for Mike Leach at Washington State. A week later, Todd Graham was named as Rolovich’s replacement.

Hawaii football is coming off its best season since 2010. Included in a 10-win season was the program’s first appearance in the Mountain West Conference championship game.  Of course, that appearance ended in a loss to Boise State.

Auburn releases statements addressing death of Pat Dye

Auburn Pat Dye
AP Photo
Leave a comment

Auburn is, as expected, mourning the death of Pat Dye.

Last month, Dye was hospitalized for kidney-related issues.  During that hospital stay, Dye tested positive for COVID-19.  At the time, his son, NFL agent Pat Dye Jr., stated that “[w]e fully anticipate his release from the hospital in the next few days once his kidney function is stable.

Monday afternoon, it was confirmed that former Auburn head coach Pat Dye died at 80. A cause of death has not been released.

Pat Dye spent a dozen seasons as the coach at Auburn.  From 1981-92, Dye went 99-39-4 with the Tigers.  Included in that was a 6-6 record in the Iron Bowl.  And a national championship in 1983.  In 2005, he was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame.

In statements, Auburn mourned the beloved coach’s death.

Allen Greene, Auburn Athletic Director
“For four decades, Coach Dye showed all of us what it looks like to be an Auburn person. His coaching exploits are well known, securing his induction into the College Football Hall of Fame. His skills as an administrator were equally formidable, resulting most notably in bringing the Iron Bowl to Jordan-Hare Stadium.

Just like his football teams, Pat Dye the athletic director was tenacious, never backing down from a fight when he believed Auburn’s good name and best interests demanded it. Thanks to his tenacity, I’ll always treasure my first home Iron Bowl, celebrating victory on the field that bears his name.

It’s been a blessing to get to know Coach Dye in his retirement years in his role as a passionate supporter of all of Auburn Athletics. Ever the coach, I’ve witnessed him on countless occasions pouring into our student-athletes. In that sense, he never stopped being Coach Dye. On behalf of the Auburn Family, we extend our deepest condolences to the family of Patrick Fain Dye, whose love and loyalty for Auburn rendered a contribution we can never fully measure or repay.”

Gus Malzahn, Auburn Head Football Coach
“Coach Dye was much more than a hall of fame coach and administrator at Auburn. He was an Auburn leader and visionary. He not only returned the football program back to national prominence during his tenure, but was a key figure in bringing the Iron Bowl to Auburn and made an impact on the university and in the community. He embodied what Auburn is about: hard work, toughness and a blue collar mentality.

Coach Dye’s impact on Auburn is endless and will stand the test of time. He had a great and deep love for Auburn and he displayed that affinity daily. I’m very appreciative of his support and friendship through the years. It’s a sad day. Coach Dye was a treasure and will be missed. My thoughts and prayers are with his family, his former players and coaches and the entire Auburn family.”

USC gives football booster the boot over tweets stating protestors should be shot

USC football
Getty Images
2 Comments

USC has one less booster for its football program.

Former Los Angeles Police Department Union attorney Marla Brown is a USC graduate.  She is also officially registered as a USC football booster.  Or, she was.

In the wake of the abhorrent murder of George Floyd, peaceful protests have, in some cases, devolved into riots and looting across the country. In tweets posted to her Twitter account Sunday morning, Brown stated “Shoot the protestors” and exclaimed, “they need to be shot.”

While the tweets are no longer available as Brown has subsequently deleted her Twitter account, they were saved for posterity.

The LAPD made it perfectly clear that Brown is not an employee.  Then USC athletic director Mike Bohn announced in a statement that the USC football program is severing its ties with Brown. “Racism and hate speech will not be tolerated,” Bohn wrote in a tweet that contained his statement, which appears in full below:

Last night we were made aware of abhorrent and blatantly racist tweets from an individual who identified as a USC Football Booster. Following an immediate investigation into the matter, we informed the individual that their season ticket and Trojan Athletic Fund membership privileges have been revoked and their payments will be promptly returned. Their account has been flagged in our system to prevent future purchases.

Thank you to the USC community for helping us identity this individual so that we could move swiftly to terminate our relationship. We stand in solidarity with the Black community.