Myriad turnovers the theme of Tide’s spring game

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And by “myriad” we mean “thiiis close to double digits” in the two-time defending BCS champion Alabama’s annual A-Day game.

Just over 78,000 fans Saturday — there were a school-record 87,000 in attendance for Auburn’s spring game, for what it’s worth — witnessed the Tide turn the ball over a whopping nine times as the White team edged the Crimson team 17-14.  The White squad, which consisted of the first-team offense, was responsible for four of the turnovers — two interceptions, two fumbles — while Team Crimson coughed it up five times — four interceptions, one fumble.

AJ McCarron, who will be entering his third year as the Tide’s starter, tossed both of the White team’s interceptions in his 19-for-30, 223-yard effort, and had a third pick called back because of defensive offsides.  He also led his side on the game-winning drive, with a 50-yard bomb to Christion Jones setting up T.J. Yeldon‘s seven-yard touchdown run late in the game.

Yeldon, incidentally, was named the Dixie Howell Award winner (game’s most valuable player) after combining for 129 yards of offense — 69 rushing, 60 receiving.  The rising sophomore led all players in both categories.  It’s also the second straight year the back has staked his claim as the spring game MVP.

McCarron’s backup, Blake Sims, also tossed two interceptions, as did early enrollee and fellow Team Crimson teammate Cooper Bateman.

Suffice to say, the offensive effort — both literally and figuratively — did not sit well with the detail-oriented Nick Saban.

“The biggest thing I was concerned about was how the team would go out there and what would be their energy, their enthusiasm, and their attention to detail,” the head coach said in quotes distributed by the team. “I don’t think that there were enough guys that answered that question in a positive way to my liking. But I’m never satisfied.”

That said, Saban made sure that everyone listening knows he’s not disappointed with his squad at this point in the offseason.  Rather, he’s merely not satisfied with where they are right now — a trait that even the head coach himself readily acknowledges is an annual occurrence.

“I spoke to a bunch of alumni groups today, and they all want me to make a comparison between this year’s team and last year’s team and the team before that, and the team before that, and the team before that,” Saban said. “And I wasn’t happy with any of those teams at this point. If I was happy with them, we wouldn’t have summer conditioning, we would not have fall camp, and we wouldn’t have thirty practices to get ready for our first game against Virginia Tech. We’d just pack it in and say, ‘Alright, let’s go to Atlanta and play the game.’

“We’re not there yet. That’s why we have all these practices, that’s why we have all the work we need to do.

McCarron, though, pretty much summed up quite well most everyone’s feelings on a game that’s nothing more than a glorified scrimmage.

“This is like playing in an all-star game. You don’t get in a rhythm. It’s not a real game, but it’s fun to go out there and try to make plays happen, and do some trick plays,” the senior said.

The attendance total of 78,315 was the sixth-largest in the storied program’s history, with the five highest coming in the first five years of Saban’s run in Tuscaloosa.  The largest crowd ever to witness an A-Day game was 92,310 in 2011.

As the school wrote in its press release, “[m]ore than 592,000 fans have attended the seven A-Day games during Saban’s tenure as head coach, including 90,000 plus in three of the seven years.”

Ex-UConn QB transfers to D2 school to compete for starting job

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Quarterback Jordan McAfee never got his chance to play at UConn, so he is transferring to a new program to get a crack at a starting job. McAfee will look for his chance at Assumption College, a Division 2 school in Worcester, Massachusetts competing in the Northeast-10 Conference.

It is not often you see a player move from a FBS program down to a Division 2 school, but it is not unprecedented.

I transferred to compete for the starting job,” McAfee said to Hearst Connecticut Media, according to a report from New Haven Register. As noted by the report, Assumption has a handful of quarterbacks already on the roster but lacks experience at the position. Not that Mcafee fixes that concern, but he figures to bring a bigger upside to the position.

McAfee committed to UConn over an offer from Boston College, according to his Rivals profile, in the Class of 2017. The pro-style quarterback never got a chance to play for the Huskies in 2018 after sitting out the 2017 season as a redshirt player.

Suddenly, UConn is in a bit of a bind at the quarterback position with spring football next on deck for the Huskies. Just two quarterbacks are currently on the roster following offseason departures for graduation or transfer with redshirt freshman Marvin Washington and freshman Steve Krajewski. UConn will add incoming recruit Jack Zergiotis this summer as the Huskies could have a three-man race for the starting job leading up to the start of the 2019 season.

Because McAfee is transferring to a lower-division program, he will be eligible to play right away in 2019 instead of having to sit out a year before becoming eligible again.

Is new Georgia OC James Coley already on NFL radar?

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This time of the year generally leads to plenty of speculation and name dropping for the sake of creating buzz and conversation. Many times, names of “potential” candidates for various coaching jobs, whether for head coach or an assistant role, around the college game and the NFL will be thrown against the wall just to see what sticks. So when a name pops up in the conversation immediately after a coaching change anywhere is made, it is best to tread carefully around the rumor mill and give things some time to breathe.

But that won’t stop us from monitoring what is being thrown out there when it relates to some coaches around college football. Case in point, the idea that Georgia offensive coordinator James Coley could be a potential target for the Dallas Cowboys following a coaching change with the NFC East champions earlier today. The Cowboys fired offensive coordinator Scott Linehan on Friday and are now in the market for an offensive coordinator. According to Ian Rapoport of NFL Network, via Twitter, Coley could be among those considered for the opening with the Cowboys.

Coley’s name popping up for a possible NFL job isn’t all that shocking. It seems anyone with even the slightest connection to Alabama head coach Nick Saban seems to be in the pool of candidates for any number of jobs every year in the coaching carousel around college football and in the NFL. We previously noted that was seemingly becoming more and more the case with Georgia head coach Kirby Smart even having his name floated around the NFL rumor mill a bit. Coley is a former Saban assistant during Saban’s time at LSU and with the Miami Dolphins. He has also been a part of the Florida State coaching staff from 2008 through 2012, Miami from 2013 through 2015 and Georgia since 2016. He has had plenty of experience around players going on to the NFL and that is not taken lightly.

Coley was just promoted to being the offensive coordinator at Georgia following the departure of Jim Chaney to Tennessee. Odds are probably pretty good Georgia won’t have to worry about losing a second offensive coordinator this offseason, but you just never know this time of the year.

Joe Moglia steps down as head coach at Coastal Carolina, Jamey Chadwell promoted as replacement

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Just when you thought the coaching carousel closed the books once again for the offseason, it appears there is at least one more change to make note of heading into the 2019 season. Joe Moglia is stepping down as head coach of Coastal Carolina, the school announced on Friday afternoon. Associate head coach and offensive coordinator Jamey Chadwell will take over as the new head coach of the program.

Moglia announced he will stay on as Chairman of Athletics for the remainder of his current contract with the university, which runs through June 2021. Moglia will have executive authority over the football program as well.

“On behalf of the Coastal Carolina University family I want to thank Joe Moglia for all he has done not only to transform our football program, but for his support of the University,” Coastal Carolina University President David DeCenzo said in a released statement. “Joe is one of those individuals who bring such great talent and success to everything he’s touched. He’s taken us to a level that years ago was simply a dream. He leaves the coaching ranks with all the well-deserved accolades; and leaves a Coastal football legacy that is poised for even better accomplishments.”

Moglia took one of the most unique paths to becoming the head coach of the Chanticleers. Moglia left a career in the financial industry when he stepped down as CEO of TD Ameritrade in 2008. He joined Bo Pelini in an assistant coaching role at Nebraska, his first time coaching football since being the defensive coordinator at Dartmouth in 1983. After two years with the Huskers, Moglia was named the head coach of the Omaha Nighthawks of the short-lived UFL in 2011, and he became the head coach at Coastal Carolina in 2012.

Under Moglia’s leadership, Coastal Carolina became a rising power at the FCS level with successive playoff appearances from 2012 through 2015 before making the transition to the FCS in 2016. Coastal Carolina went 10-2 in their transition season before jumping into the Sun Belt Conference in 2017. Moglia, however, took the 2017 season off for medical reasons. Chadwell took on the role of interim head coach for the 2017 season and remained on the staff as associate head coach and offensive coordinator in 2018 after Moglia returned to the sidelines for the program.

With Chadwell as the next head coach of the Coastal Carolina program, there should be a smooth transition with some stability on the coaching staff late in the offseason for coaching changes.

Wisconsin renews contract of Paul Chryst into 2024

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In what has seemingly been an annual tradition in Madison, Wisconsin has renewed the contract of head football coach Paul Chryst by tacking on another year. Chryst is now under contract through Jan. 31, 2024 with his latest renewal following approval from the University of Wisconsin Athletic Board.

Wisconsin renewed Chryst’s contract a year ago, extending his contract through the end of Jan. 2023. Wisconsin and Chryst originally agreed on a contract that was set to expire on Jan. 31, 2020 with a written agreement that the contract may be extended with a positive annual review beginning after the 2015 football season.

The Badgers may be coming off a relatively disappointing season with a record of 8-5, but Chryst has gone 42-12 in his first four seasons as head coach of the Badgers and it is expected Wisconsin will remain a consistent contender in the Big Ten West Division with a shot to play for and win the Big Ten championship in the years to come.

According to the USA Today coaching salary database for the 2018 season, Chryst was paid $3.75 million last season. Specific details of how much Chryst will be paid now were not announced by Wisconsin.

Wisconsin also renewed the contracts of volleyball coach Kelly Sheffield, women’s soccer coach Paula Wilkins, and men’s soccer coach John Trask.