No bowl ban, 18-month show-cause for Kelly in Oregon’s NCAA case

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Looks like Oregon, in fact, won the day. With its NCAA case, that is.

As promised from yesterday, the NCAA’s Committee on Infractions released its findings into its two-year-plus investigation into Oregon’s football program and its business relationship with recruiting service provider Willie Lyles. In conclusion, the NCAA claims the following:

“… The University of Oregon used a recruiting service provider, who became a representative of the university’s athletics interests, to assist the school with the recruitment of multiple prospective student-athletes,” the review states. “The representative provided cash and free lodging to a prospect and engaged in impermissible calls and off-campus contacts with football prospects, their families and high school coaches.

“Additionally, the football program allowed staff members to engage in recruiting activity, which resulted in the football program exceeding coaching limits. Both the former head football coach and the university agreed they failed to monitor the football program.”

Both Oregon and former coach Chip Kelly, now with the Philadelphia Eagles, agreed they failed to monitor the program adequately. As a result of the infractions, Oregon has been hit with multiple sanctions and Kelly has been given a show-cause penalty. However, the Ducks will not face a bowl ban as part of their punishment from the NCAA. The sanctions include:

— Three years of probation from June 26, 2013, through June 25, 2016 (the university had proposed two years of probation).

— A reduction of one scholarship per signing class (from 25) for the 2012-13 and 2013-14 academic years (self-imposed).

— A reduction of total scholarships by one (from 85) through the 2015-16 academic year (self-imposed).

— A reduction of official paid football visits to from 56 to 37 for the 2012-13, 2013-14 and 2014-15 academic years.

— A reduction of permissible football evaluation days from 42 to 36 in the fall of 2013, 2014 and 2015 and permissible football evaluation days from 168 to 144 in the spring of 2014, 2015 and 2016.

— A ban on the subscription to recruiting services during the probation period.

— A disassociation of the recruiting service provider (self-imposed).

Additionally, Kelly faces an 18-month show-cause penalty through Dec. 25, 2014. The NCAA states if any member wishes to hire Kelly, he and the school “must appear before the Committee on Infractions to determine if the school should be subject to the show-cause procedures.”

Here are links to the Infractions Report and the Compliance Review.

Ex-Tennessee QB who transferred to Houston now moving to CMU

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Over the weekend, Central Michigan landed a new head football coach.  A couple of days later, they landed a potential starting quarterback as well.

In somewhat of a surprising move, Quinten Dormady announced on Twitter Tuesday morning that he has decided to transfer from Houston.  Not only that, but Dormady confirmed that he will be continuing his collegiate playing career for McElwain at CMU.

The move comes a little over six months after UH confirmed that the quarterback had transferred in from Tennessee.

Because Dormady didn’t play in more than four games this past season for the Cougars, he can take advantage of the NCAA’s new redshirt rule and save a year of eligibility.  He’ll also be eligible to play immediately for the Chips in 2019 as a graduate transfer.

In his one and only season with the Cougars, Dormady completed two of his five passes for eight yards.  With star quarterback D’Eriq King set to return for one more season, there was little chance of Dormady seeing meaningful playing time in what will be his final year of collegiate eligibility.

Dormady was the Vols’ starter to open what turned out to be Butch Jones‘ final season in Knoxville.  In starting the first five games of 2017, Dormady had accounted for eight turnovers, six of which were the result of interceptions. Five of those picks came in losses to Florida (three) and Georgia (two).

Coming off a bye, redshirt freshman Jarrett Guarantano started the Week 7 loss to South Carolina after Dormady was benched following the loss to UGA.  Prior to the Week 9 road trip to Kentucky, it was reported that Dormady would be sidelined the remainder of the year because of a shoulder injury.

Dormady, who grew up near San Antonio, completed 76-of-137 passes (55.5%) for 925 yards, six touchdowns and the six interceptions this past season.  The 6-4, 222-pounder finished the Vols portion of his playing career with 1,282 yards, seven touchdown and six picks.  He also ran the ball 22 times for a total of 21 yards.

Report: Nick Saban to stay in-house, promote Dan Enos to OC

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And for his fifth offensive coordinator since the beginning of the 2016 season, it appears Nick Saban will stay in-house.

Exactly one week ago, Maryland announced that Alabama offensive coordinator Mike Locksley had been named as the Terrapins’ next head football coach.  While Locksley will remain with the Crimson Tide through the playoffs, Saban has apparently gone about the business of replacing him as FootballScoop.com is reporting that Dan Enos will be the team’s coordinator moving forward.

Enos spent the 2018 season, his first in Tuscaloosa, as the Tide’s quarterbacks coach.  He also carries the title of associate head coach.

Enos, who was a candidate for the Kansas job that ultimately went to Les Miles, was the head coach at Central Michigan for five seasons (2010-14).  After posting a 26-36 record with the Chippewas, which included a 7-6 mark in 2015, Enos abruptly left the MAC school to take the offensive coordinator job at Arkansas in January of 2015.  With Bret Bielema fired shortly after the end of the 2017 season, the 50-year-old Enos took a job on Jim Harbaugh‘s coaching staff in early January of this year… only to leave less than three weeks later for Alabama.

The coordinator job at Arkansas was Enos’ first at the FBS level.  And, as previously noted, Enos would be Saban’s fifth coordinator in less than three full seasons.

One week before the national championship game for the 2016 season, and after he was initially expected to remain in his job through the playoffs, it was announced that Lane Kiffin would be leaving Alabama for the head-coaching job at Florida Atlantic, effective immediately.  Kiffin was replaced by Steve Sarkisian, who called plays in the title game but then left a month later for a job in the NFL.  Brian Daboll replaced Sarkisian and lasted one season coordinating the Tide’s offense before he too left for the NFL.  Daboll remained with the Tide through their playoff run last season.

Tim Brown’s 1987 Heisman fetches record price at auction

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Tim Brown has registered another entry on his record-setting résumé, albeit indirectly.

Last month, it was reported that Brown’s 1987 Heisman Trophy, which he sold to a private collector a year ago, would be going up for auction.  After online bidding began on Nov. 19 and closed Dec. 5, Sports Collectors Daily has reported that the stiff-armed trophy won by the former Notre Dame wide receiver sold for $435,763 over the weekend.

It’s believed it’s the highest amount ever paid for a Heisman.

“We believe this is one of the most significant trophies to ever be offered at auction and collectors agreed as the bidding was fierce,” said Ken Goldin, founder of Goldin Auctions. “It’s rare when a Heisman becomes available and even more unusual for it to be from an NFL Hall of Famer who played at the most storied college football program.”

Earlier this year, the Heisman Trophy of the late Colorado running back Rashaan Salaam sold for nearly $400,000, a record number for such an award at the time.

The family of Yale running back Clint Frank sold his 1937 trophy in October of this year for $317,000.  O.J. Simpson’s 1968 Trophy sold for $255,000 in 1999, while another former USC running back, Charles White, sold his Heisman for $184,000 in 2000.

Beginning in 1999, winners of the Heisman Trophy have been barred from selling their trophies by the trust that oversees the honor.

Report: Butch Jones leaving Alabama for job at Maryland

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College Park is taking on a decidedly Tuscaloosa feel to it.

Earlier this month, Maryland confirmed that it had hired Alabama offensive coordinator Mike Locksley as its next head football coach.  Citing multiple sources with knowledge of the situation, 247Sports.com is now reporting that Butch Jones is leaving Nick Saban‘s program for a spot on Locksley’s Terrapins coaching staff.

Jones, who met with Locksley earlier this month before agreeing to take the job, is expected to serve as the Terps’ tight ends coach.  He’ll also carry the title of associate head coach for the Big Ten program.

In March of this year, Saban added Jones to his Alabama football staff as an offensive analyst.  Jones, of course, was the head coach at rival Tennessee for nearly five seasons before he was summarily dismissed in mid-November of last year.

Jones last served as a tight ends coach in 1998 at Central Michigan; he was last a position coach at West Virginia (2005-06).

Per the terms of his UT contract, Jones will be paid just north of $8 million in the form of a buyout, minus whatever he was to make at future jobs through February of 2021.  He made $35,000 as an analyst at Alabama this year.