A&M, Oregon lose players to new targeting penalties

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One of the most talked about new rules implemented for the 2013 season is the “new” targeting rule.  Specifically, new penalties for targeting: if a player is flagged 15 yards for targeting, the player is either ejected for the rest of the game if the penalty occurs in the first half, or is suspended for the first half of the next game if it occurs in the second half.

Saturday afternoon, both ends of the new punitive measures hit a pair of Top-10 teams.

In the Texas A&M-Rice game, Aggies defensive back Deshazor Everett was flagged for targeting the son of Gary Kubiak, Owls wide receiver Klein Kubiak.  Because the penalty came late in the fourth quarter, Everett will be suspended for the first half of next weekend’s game against Sam Houston State.

Interestingly, Everett was suspended for the first half of the opener in punishment meted out by head coach Kevin Sumlin for an offseason incident.

Courtesy of SBNation, here’s a clip of the hit in question; you can also click HERE for another angle of it:

Deshazor Everett

 

A short time later,  Oregon’s Terrance Mitchell was on the receiving end of a 15-yard penalty following a brutal helmet-to-helmet hit on a sliding Nicholls State quarterback, Beaux Hebert.  As that hit came in the first quarter, Mitchell will miss the remainder of the game.

While there is some serious — and rightful — concern over how the rule will be interpreted by different officiating crews, in these two cases — we haven’t come across any video for the Duck hit — it appears that the zebras were spot on in ejecting the players based on the way the rule is written.

Son of Outkast star Big Boi commits to Oregon

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It seems things are beginning to turn around for Oregon under head coach Mario Cristobal. A week after knocking off rival Washington in a key Pac-12 matchup and on the eve of another big division game on the road against Washington State, the Ducks reeled in the verbal commitment of Georgia running back Cross Patton for the Class of 2019. Patton is the son of Outkast’s Big Boi.

Patton announced his decision in front of his teammates on Friday, with his proud father capturing the moment on Instagram.

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#ScoDucks 🦆 #18 @crosspatton #PattonClan

A post shared by Big Boi (@bigboi) on

Although Patton is not rated by the recruiting services, mostly due to his size (5′ 6″, 170 lb according to Rivals), there is value to having a celebrity dad on board with the program that Oregon could take advantage of, especially if Patton develops into a weapon for the Ducks moving forward either on offense or special teams. And for a program looking to continue to move back to the top of the Pac-12 with the kind of swag the Ducks had at the height of the Chip Kelly era, the potential appears to be there.

Patton chose Oregon over a handful of offers to form FCS program including Columbia and Butler. Rivals also listed Georgia Tech as a school Patton was interested in. Florida State, with former Oregon head coach Willie Taggart, also appeared to be making a sales pitch for Patton. Big Boi was invited to perform at Florida State’s home game against Wake Forest today.

UAB football players to wear names of child patients on uniforms

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UAB and North Texas collide today in a pivotal Conference USA matchup between the 6-1 Mean Green (2-1 in Conference USA) and the 5-1 Blazers (3-0 in Conference USA. The matchup alone is enough to carry plenty of importance moving forward as far as the conference championship race is concerned, but today UAB will be doing something that means something more beyond football by paying tribute to patients at Children’s Harbor, a medical center focusing on assisting children and their families dealing with serious illnesses.

Players for UAB will ditch their own names on the back of their jerseys and instead will wear the names of a young patient at Children’s Harbor. It has become a bit of a tradition for the Blazers and is a nice way to be a part of the community since the football program was resurrected.

“It shows the city how appreciative we were when the program shutdown,” UAB wide receiver Collin Lisa said, via Al.com. “It’s not just the university, it’s about the city, the medical center, and all the little kids. It’s way more than just the game of football here.”

A full list of the children each UAB player will be representing today can be found here.

Indiana confirms 2½-year suspension for Morgan Ellison, permanent dismissal from football team

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Morgan Ellison‘s time in Bloomington has officially come to an end.

Friday night, Indiana announced that the running back has been suspended for two and a half years from the university as well as permanently dismissed from the Hoosiers football team. On Oct. 3, an IU panel determined that Ellison had sexually assaulted a female student in mid-August of this year.

IU’s announcement yesterday came after Ellison had appealed the original ruling.

The unidentified victim had alleged at the hearing that she was sexually assaulted in her sleep by Ellison. “It hurt so much and when I woke up I was like stop stop and he wouldn’t stop,” the alleged victim claimed in a text to a friend shortly after the assault, the Indianapolis Star had previously reported.

During the hearing, Ellison had claimed that all sexual activity that night in August was consensual.

Ellison has not been charged criminally in connection to the alleged sexual assault, although it’s unclear if the university’s police department is investigating the allegations.

In late August, Indiana announced that Ellison had been indefinitely suspended from all football activities, including games and practice, by Tom Allen for unspecified violations of team rules. Oct. 2, one day before the panel found him guilty, the head coach revealed that the running back was permitted to practice with his teammates but would remain suspended from playing in games for the foreseeable future.

Last season, Ellison led the Hoosiers with 143 carries for 704 yards and six touchdowns. The true junior had not played in any of the Hoosiers’ games this season before or after the panel’s ruling.

Tim Tebow wonders if Nick Bosa will regret decision

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Everybody has an opinion on one of the biggest storylines of the past week in college football, including a former Heisman Trophy winner.

Tuesday, Ohio State announced that, because of injury, Nick Bosa had decided to withdraw from school “in order to devote more time to his rehabilitation and training efforts” for the 2019 NFL draft. Bosa’s father explained that the decision was “difficult on” his son, who “had set all kinds of team goals.”

One of those team goals was likely earning a berth in the College Football Playoff. Because he withdrew from school, Bosa will not be a part of the playoffs if the Buckeyes qualify, a decision that Tim Tebow said the All-American defensive end could very well come to regret.

From USA Today:

This is a really tough situation, because yes, he’s got a severe injury and he’d probably be out until early December healing from it. One one side you can say ‘you know what, if he waits and he goes and trains, he can probably make 20 to 30 million dollars, and that’s amazing.’

But at the same point, when you’re 50 years old and you look back, aren’t you going to regret it a little bit? To say ‘my guys went to the playoff and they played Alabama in the championship… I could have been with them, but I was more worried about the money.’

Listen, your family’s already made however many million. You’re probably still going to make that. And I get that you want to be safe and keep your body [healthy], and I can see both sides. I get where he’s coming from. But at the same point, this is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. You’ve got a team that has a chance to win a championship. Your brother’s got one. You don’t want to compete to go win a championship like your brother?

For me, what I would do? I would wait, I would get healthy, and if my team was in the Playoff, I’m going to compete with my team. But that’s who I am.

As long as Nick Bosa is comfortable with his decision, that’s all that really matters — regardless of what Tebow would or wouldn’t have done