Penn State hands Michigan first loss in fourth overtime

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I had to rewrite this game story a few times. You see, Michigan had a ten point lead midway through the fourth quarter and Penn State’s offense was looking to be out of steam. But then, almost out of nowhere it seemed, Penn State pulled an 80-yard touchdown drive with 50 seconds to play in regulation with no timeouts to use. The score tied the game at 34-34 but Michigan still had a chance to sneak out of State College with a win, but a 52-yard attempt by Brendan Gibbons in the final seconds of the game fell short, which ended up sending the game in to overtime. Things really started to get crazy after that.

Penn State served Michigan their first loss of the season, with Bill Belton scoring the game-winning touchdown in the fourth overtime for a 43-40 victory that 107,000 fans will not soon forget. Belton’s touchdown was the only time in four overtimes the ball crossed a goal line. Michigan had their chances to secure another tight victory this season, but a mixture of special teams failures and missed opportunities would come back to haunt the Wolverines.

In the first overtime Penn State kicker Sam Ficken missed a 40-yard attempt, but Michigan was unable to capitalize because the Nittany Lions special teams unit blocked a 40-yard attempt set up by conservative play calling. Michigan got as close as the eight yard line to open the second overtime, setting Gibbons up for a 25-yard field goal. Penn State would answer with a 36-yard kick from Ficken to force a third overtime.

The third overtime started ominously for Penn State when Allen Robinson fumbled the first play of the third overtime. On an end-around play, Robinson never gained control of a handoff from Penn State’s freshman quarterback Christian Hackenberg. The ball dropped loose in the back field and Michigan defensive lineman Frank Clark pounced on the ball to turn the game over to Michigan’s offense with a golden opportunity to walk out of Beaver Stadium with their first win against the Nittany Lions since 2007. But from 33 yards back, Gibbons had his kick fly left of the goal post despite being set up in the middle of the field. Yes, this game would need a fourth overtime and it was becoming clear this one was not going to be decided by special teams.

the fourth overtime did not go well for Michigan’s offense. Two incomplete passes by Devin Gardner failed to move the football forward, and a delay of game put Michigan back on the 30-yard line. A seven-yard run by Gardner set Gibbons up for a 40-yard attempt, which was good for a 40-37 lead before Penn State got their chance. Penn State relied on the running game to start moving the football forward, with Belton carrying the load. Belton had taken over in the backfield as the primary rusher after Zach Zwinak‘s struggles became a problem. Belton carried the football three times to put Penn State in a fourth and one. Rather than kick and move to a fifth overtime, Penn State head coach Bill O’Brien kept his offense on the field to pick up the first down. It worked, with Belton showing patience to pick up a couple of extra yards. After a pass interference call against Michigan in the end zone gave Penn State a free first down, Belton cashed in with a run to the left side of the field and nothing but open room from two yards out. The touchdown by Belton clinched the win for Penn State and sent Michigan home regretting giving Penn State a shot at this one.

Michigan’s defense had done a good job in the second half, which started with a fumble returned for a touchdown on Penn State’s first play of the second half. The return cut Penn State’s lead to 21-17 and the Wolverines took a 27-24 lead in to the fourth quarter. A 37-yard touchdown pass from Gardner to tightend Devin Funchess caught Penn State without a safety on the field and a linebacker chasing down field well out of position. It was a play like that which seemed to show how Penn State’s depth issues were starting to hurt them. But this Penn State team found a way to bounce back when the going got tough, something that eluded them a week ago in Bloomington, Indiana. Penn State gets all sorts of credit for coming back the way they did time and time again, but there are some real concerns about Michigan going forward now.

Michigan once again struggled in a game they probably should have won without much of a problem. The road woes continued for Michigan head coach Brady Hoke, and now the Wolverines are left scratching their heads instead of celebrating a 6-0 start. Can Michigan still come back and make a run for Indianapolis, the site of the Big Ten championship game? Absolutely, because nobody in the Big Ten’s Legends Division is running away with anything. Northwestern lost to Wisconsin and Michigan still has games against the Wildcats, Michigan State and Nebraska ahead of them before getting to Ohio State.

Ex-UConn QB transfers to D2 school to compete for starting job

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Quarterback Jordan McAfee never got his chance to play at UConn, so he is transferring to a new program to get a crack at a starting job. McAfee will look for his chance at Assumption College, a Division 2 school in Worcester, Massachusetts competing in the Northeast-10 Conference.

It is not often you see a player move from a FBS program down to a Division 2 school, but it is not unprecedented.

I transferred to compete for the starting job,” McAfee said to Hearst Connecticut Media, according to a report from New Haven Register. As noted by the report, Assumption has a handful of quarterbacks already on the roster but lacks experience at the position. Not that Mcafee fixes that concern, but he figures to bring a bigger upside to the position.

McAfee committed to UConn over an offer from Boston College, according to his Rivals profile, in the Class of 2017. The pro-style quarterback never got a chance to play for the Huskies in 2018 after sitting out the 2017 season as a redshirt player.

Suddenly, UConn is in a bit of a bind at the quarterback position with spring football next on deck for the Huskies. Just two quarterbacks are currently on the roster following offseason departures for graduation or transfer with redshirt freshman Marvin Washington and freshman Steve Krajewski. UConn will add incoming recruit Jack Zergiotis this summer as the Huskies could have a three-man race for the starting job leading up to the start of the 2019 season.

Because McAfee is transferring to a lower-division program, he will be eligible to play right away in 2019 instead of having to sit out a year before becoming eligible again.

Is new Georgia OC James Coley already on NFL radar?

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This time of the year generally leads to plenty of speculation and name dropping for the sake of creating buzz and conversation. Many times, names of “potential” candidates for various coaching jobs, whether for head coach or an assistant role, around the college game and the NFL will be thrown against the wall just to see what sticks. So when a name pops up in the conversation immediately after a coaching change anywhere is made, it is best to tread carefully around the rumor mill and give things some time to breathe.

But that won’t stop us from monitoring what is being thrown out there when it relates to some coaches around college football. Case in point, the idea that Georgia offensive coordinator James Coley could be a potential target for the Dallas Cowboys following a coaching change with the NFC East champions earlier today. The Cowboys fired offensive coordinator Scott Linehan on Friday and are now in the market for an offensive coordinator. According to Ian Rapoport of NFL Network, via Twitter, Coley could be among those considered for the opening with the Cowboys.

Coley’s name popping up for a possible NFL job isn’t all that shocking. It seems anyone with even the slightest connection to Alabama head coach Nick Saban seems to be in the pool of candidates for any number of jobs every year in the coaching carousel around college football and in the NFL. We previously noted that was seemingly becoming more and more the case with Georgia head coach Kirby Smart even having his name floated around the NFL rumor mill a bit. Coley is a former Saban assistant during Saban’s time at LSU and with the Miami Dolphins. He has also been a part of the Florida State coaching staff from 2008 through 2012, Miami from 2013 through 2015 and Georgia since 2016. He has had plenty of experience around players going on to the NFL and that is not taken lightly.

Coley was just promoted to being the offensive coordinator at Georgia following the departure of Jim Chaney to Tennessee. Odds are probably pretty good Georgia won’t have to worry about losing a second offensive coordinator this offseason, but you just never know this time of the year.

Joe Moglia steps down as head coach at Coastal Carolina, Jamey Chadwell promoted as replacement

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Just when you thought the coaching carousel closed the books once again for the offseason, it appears there is at least one more change to make note of heading into the 2019 season. Joe Moglia is stepping down as head coach of Coastal Carolina, the school announced on Friday afternoon. Associate head coach and offensive coordinator Jamey Chadwell will take over as the new head coach of the program.

Moglia announced he will stay on as Chairman of Athletics for the remainder of his current contract with the university, which runs through June 2021. Moglia will have executive authority over the football program as well.

“On behalf of the Coastal Carolina University family I want to thank Joe Moglia for all he has done not only to transform our football program, but for his support of the University,” Coastal Carolina University President David DeCenzo said in a released statement. “Joe is one of those individuals who bring such great talent and success to everything he’s touched. He’s taken us to a level that years ago was simply a dream. He leaves the coaching ranks with all the well-deserved accolades; and leaves a Coastal football legacy that is poised for even better accomplishments.”

Moglia took one of the most unique paths to becoming the head coach of the Chanticleers. Moglia left a career in the financial industry when he stepped down as CEO of TD Ameritrade in 2008. He joined Bo Pelini in an assistant coaching role at Nebraska, his first time coaching football since being the defensive coordinator at Dartmouth in 1983. After two years with the Huskers, Moglia was named the head coach of the Omaha Nighthawks of the short-lived UFL in 2011, and he became the head coach at Coastal Carolina in 2012.

Under Moglia’s leadership, Coastal Carolina became a rising power at the FCS level with successive playoff appearances from 2012 through 2015 before making the transition to the FCS in 2016. Coastal Carolina went 10-2 in their transition season before jumping into the Sun Belt Conference in 2017. Moglia, however, took the 2017 season off for medical reasons. Chadwell took on the role of interim head coach for the 2017 season and remained on the staff as associate head coach and offensive coordinator in 2018 after Moglia returned to the sidelines for the program.

With Chadwell as the next head coach of the Coastal Carolina program, there should be a smooth transition with some stability on the coaching staff late in the offseason for coaching changes.

Wisconsin renews contract of Paul Chryst into 2024

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In what has seemingly been an annual tradition in Madison, Wisconsin has renewed the contract of head football coach Paul Chryst by tacking on another year. Chryst is now under contract through Jan. 31, 2024 with his latest renewal following approval from the University of Wisconsin Athletic Board.

Wisconsin renewed Chryst’s contract a year ago, extending his contract through the end of Jan. 2023. Wisconsin and Chryst originally agreed on a contract that was set to expire on Jan. 31, 2020 with a written agreement that the contract may be extended with a positive annual review beginning after the 2015 football season.

The Badgers may be coming off a relatively disappointing season with a record of 8-5, but Chryst has gone 42-12 in his first four seasons as head coach of the Badgers and it is expected Wisconsin will remain a consistent contender in the Big Ten West Division with a shot to play for and win the Big Ten championship in the years to come.

According to the USA Today coaching salary database for the 2018 season, Chryst was paid $3.75 million last season. Specific details of how much Chryst will be paid now were not announced by Wisconsin.

Wisconsin also renewed the contracts of volleyball coach Kelly Sheffield, women’s soccer coach Paula Wilkins, and men’s soccer coach John Trask.