Full Mizzou statements on Michael Sam’s historic revelation

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As you’ve no doubt heard by now, the sports world witnessed some significant history being played out Sunday evening.

Michael Sam, who ended his stellar Missouri career in 2013 as an All-American defensive end and co-leader in the SEC in sacks, announced to the world last night that he is in fact gay.  The public proclamation sets Sam up to become the first active, openly-gay player in the NFL, with the defensive lineman expected to be taken somewhere in the middle(ish) rounds of the upcoming draft.

While the news took the general public by surprise, it was far from that for the Mizzou football program.  During summer camp last August, Sam revealed to his teammates and coaches that he is a homosexual.  In fact, some of his Tiger teammates had known for years about this aspect of Sam’s personal life.

In a statement sent out shortly after Sam’s announcement, head coach Gary Pinkel said that “[w]e discussed how to deal with that from a public standpoint, and ultimately Michael decided that he didn’t want that to be the focal point of the season.”

“We left it that whenever he felt the time was right, however he wanted to make the announcement, that we had his back and we’d be right there with him,” Pinkel added.

Both Pinkel and athletic director Mike Alden used a form of the word “pride” in discussing the huge step taken by a former member of the football program.

“We’re very proud of Michael and the courage he has displayed for coming out,” Pinkel said.

Alden stated that “[w]e are proud of him on every level.”

Below are the complete texts of the statements from Pinkel and Alden, beginning with the former:

“We’re really happy for Michael that he’s made the decision to announce this, and we’re proud of him and how he represents Mizzou. Michael is a great example of just how important it is to be respectful of others, he’s taught a lot of people here first-hand that it doesn’t matter what your background is, or your personal orientation, we’re all on the same team and we all support each other. If Michael doesn’t have the support of his teammates like he did this past year, I don’t think there’s any way he has the type of season he put together.

“We talk all the time here in our program about how one of our core values is to respect the cultural differences of others, and this certainly applies. We view ourselves as one big family that has a very diverse collection of people from all walks of life, and if you’re part of our family, we support you.

“Looking back, I take great pride in how Michael and everyone in our program handled his situation. This past August, Michael was very direct with the team when he decided to let everyone know that he is gay. We discussed how to deal with that from a public standpoint, and ultimately Michael decided that he didn’t want that to be the focal point of the season. He wanted to focus on football and not do anything to add pressure for him or for his teammates, and I think that’s a great example of the kind of person he is. We left it that whenever he felt the time was right, however he wanted to make the announcement, that we had his back and we’d be right there with him.

“We’re very proud of Michael and the courage he has displayed for coming out. We look forward to following his career, and the success he’s going to have.”

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“We are so proud of Michael for what he has accomplished at Mizzou academically, socially and competitively. This is a young man who earned his degree from MU, was a unanimous All-American on the football field and now he’s being a leader in his personal life. He continues to display great character, courage and compassion. We are proud of him on every level.

“We work very hard at the University of Missouri to provide an environment that is respectful and inclusive of all people. We’re pleased with the strides we’ve made over the years with our student-athletes, coaches and staff about respecting and celebrating our differences. We continue to grow every day. We talk all the time about our core value of respect, and we emphasize that in a number of ways, whether it’s through individual actions, team settings, public efforts such as our ‘If You Can Play, You Can Play’ video, and even our Men-for-Men and Women-for-Women programs.

“The University’s theme is called ‘One Mizzou.’ What that theme represents is that we are all family, we are all Tigers, and we should all respect and appreciate each other.

“We wish Michael all the best in all that he does.”

Memphis loses OC to Auburn, DC to FCS head coaching job

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Thanks to the events of the last 24 hours or so, Mike Norvell will have a significantly reshaped Memphis coaching staff when the 2019 season kicks off.

First, Auburn announced Sunday night that it has hired Kenny Dillingham as Gus Malzahn‘s offensive coordinator.  The 28-year-old Dillingham, who will also coach quarterbacks, replaces Chip Lindsey, who left for the coordinator job under Les Miles at Kansas.

Dillingham spent the 2018 season as the coordinator and quarterbacks coach at Memphis.

“Kenny is one of the rising stars in our profession, coaching two top 10 nationally ranked offenses the last two years,” Malzahn said. “Because of Kenny’s energy, intelligence and genuine care for his players, he’s been highly successful coaching quarterbacks and is an outstanding recruiter, while working closely with Mike Norvell in developing one of the nation’s top offenses.”

The football program also confirmed that Malzahn will resume calling plays for the Tigers’ offense next season, just as he did from 2013-15.  In 2016, those duties fell to Rhett Lashlee; the past two seasons, Lindsey called the plays.

Dillingham wasn’t responsible for calling plays with the AAC Tigers as those duties fell to Norvell on gameday.

In addition to losing Dillingham, Memphis has also seen Chris Ball leave as the defensive coordinator was named Monday as the new head coach at FCS Northern Arizona.  Ball had spent the past three seasons as Norvell’s coordinator.

Ball, who was an assistant at Arizona State from 2012-15, will be introduced as the program’s 30th head football coach at a Wednesday press conference.

K-State announces North Dakota State’s Chris Klieman as Bill Snyder’s replacement

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One of the most successful coaches at the FCS level is making the move up to replace one of the most beloved figures at the FBS level — albeit not immediately as he has some unfinished postseason business at his current school to take care of.

Monday night, Kansas State announced that Chris Klieman has been hired as the Wildcats’ as the football program’s 35th head coach.  Klieman replaces the legendary Bill Snyder, who retired earlier this month after two separate stints at the school for a total of nearly three decades.

“I’m very excited to have Chris Klieman lead our program,” athletic director Gene Taylor said in a statement. “He is a perfect fit for us, both from a personal standpoint and as a head coach. He’s a tremendous teacher who I had the pleasure to hire at NDSU and watched him turn into a very successful coach. He will bring a ton of energy and excitement. His teams play extremely hard, disciplined football. He’s a winner. That’s all he does is win, and we’re excited to have Chris, Rhonda and the entire Klieman family join our K-State family. They will be a great fit not only for Kansas State Football and Kansas State Athletics, but also the entire community of Manhattan.”

Klieman is in his fifth season as the head coach at FCS powerhouse North Dakota State.  In the first four seasons, the Bison claimed three national championships (2014, 2015, 2017) and advanced to the semifinals the other year (2016).

In 2018, North Dakota State is a perfect 13-0 and will face South Dakota State in one of the two semifinal matchups Friday night.  Klieman will remain with the Bison through this year’s playoff run.

All told, the 51-year-old Klieman is 67-6 at North Dakota State.

“This is an absolute dream job,” a statement from Klieman began. “I’m so happy and thrilled to follow a legend in Coach Snyder. I’ve followed him from afar, went to his camps while playing in Waterloo, Iowa, and played against his Kansas State team when I was at Northern Iowa. The opportunity to follow in an icon’s footsteps is something I don’t take for granted and don’t take lightly. I know I have huge shoes to fill, and I’m excited to carry on his legacy. I have prepared my entire life for this opportunity and had great experiences at many institutions, most notably North Dakota State where we’ve had unmatched success over the last eight years. I can’t express how pleased I am and thank President Myers, Gene Taylor and the search committee for trusting in me and handing over the keys to this great program.”

Per the school, Klieman has signed a six-year contract that will pay him $2.3 million in 2019.  He will receive raises of $200,000 annually over the remaining five years of the deal.

Only Kansas’ David Beaty ($1.7 million), dismissed at the end of the regular season, made less than that figure in 2018 amongst Big 12 coaches.  Snyder, at $3.5 million, was the next lowest.

Former Texas State, Rice head coach David Bailiff lands at Texas A&M-Commerce

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One of the best pound-for-pound hires of the 2018-19 coaching cycle will be made at the Division II level. That’s where former Texas State and Rice head coach David Bailiff is headed after he was hired by Texas A&M-Commerce.

“During our comprehensive search process, David Bailiff emerged as an exceptional leader of men who exemplifies our Best in Class mission,” AD Tim McMurray said in a statement. “We had seven key pillars during our search – integrity and commitment to compliance, initiatives for student-athlete success, strategic recruiting based within the Texas footprint, a championship vision, an inclusive leadership style, excellent collaboration with campus partners, and demonstrated ability to engage our alumni and community.   With Coach Bailiff’s energy, passion, and ability to connect with student-athletes, we checked all our boxes.”

Aside from a 5-year stint as New Mexico’s defensive line coach, Bailiff is a Lone Star State lifer who played at Texas State back when the school was known as Southwest Texas State and participated in the Lone Star Conference — where A&M-Commerce lives now — and later became the head coach at his alma mater when it was an FCS school. He went 21-15 in three seasons with a Southland Conference title and a trip to the FCS (then Division I-AA) semifinals in 2005.

That success led him to Rice, where he remained head coach for 11 seasons with a 10-win campaign in 2008 and a Conference USA championship in 2013.

He was replaced by Mike Bloomgren after the 2017 season and spent this fall out of football.

“I am so thrilled to be the 20th head coach in the history of the school. I’m an old Lone Star Conference guy, and that’s where my roots are in college football,” Bailiff said. “It’s great and exciting what coach Carthel built here, and it’s the first job I’ve had where you’ve got to look at the blueprint and continue building the momentum on something great he’s already got started.”

Bailiff takes over for Colby Carthel, who left to become the head coach at FCS Stephen F. Austin. Carthel led the Lions to their first Division II national championship in 2017.

Texas Tech WR Antoine Wesley declares for NFL draft

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He didn’t win enough games at his alma mater, but Kliff Kingsbury did succeed at placing his skill players on NFL rosters. Patrick Mahomes is the MVP front-runner with three weeks left to play, and there are more Red Raider wide receivers in the League than any other college program.

And now we can go ahead and add one more.

Wide receiver Antoine Wesley declared for the NFL draft on Monday. He made the announcement through a Twitter post and a highlight video that paired with the post.

A Las Vegas native by way of Cibolo Steele High School in the San Antonio area, Wesley exploded on the scene as a junior. After catching 10 passes total in his first two seasons, Wesley recorded 88 receptions for 1,410 yards and nine touchdowns this year. He ranked ninth nationally in catches and seconds in yards and yards per game.

A rangy target at 6-foot-5, Wesley hauled in 13 passes for 261 yards and three touchdowns in a 63-49 win over Houston on Sept. 15, and in back-to-back November games against Oklahoma and Texas he combined to catch 20 passes for 370 yards and two touchdowns.

Wesley was named a Second Team All-Big 12 performer this fall.