NCAA makes recommendations to reduce contact in practice

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With the football offseason getting ready to move into summer camp mode leading up to the start of the season, the NCAA released a new set of recommended guidelines regarding player safety with a special emphasis on concussion treatments and practice habits. Among the recommendations was a limit of two contact practices per week during the season. The new guidelines are a result of months of collaborative work between the NCAA, College Athletic Trainers’ Society, various medical organizations, coaches and conference commissioners.

Unlike official rule changes, the recommendations released by the NCAA on Monday are said to be working in “real-time,” which allows the NCAA to change or modify the guidelines on the fly as more research becomes available rather than wait for the next season to come around.

“Medicine really is a process that’s much more fluid, which led us to the guideline approach rather than pursuing legislation,” NCAA Chief Medical Officer Brian Hainline said. “The words we like to use are ‘living, breathing.’ We’d much rather have a living, breathing document that can shift based on emerging evidence.”

However, because these are simply guidelines, it is still up to the conferences and schools to choose to adopt them and make them a standard. The NCAA cannot punish a school or conference for operating under other methods or policies, but it can say “We told you so.” Because this was a combined effort, it is expected these guidelines will be adopted throughout the sport.

“These guidelines are strict in concept but flexible in design, allowing coaches ample freedom to design practice schedules while limiting the amount of full-contact situations that players will experience,” said Montana State University head football coach Rob Ash. “There is no doubt in my mind that coaching staffs across the country at all levels will enthusiastically endorse these guidelines and incorporate them into their football practice regimen.”

The Pac-12 has already instituted a policy limiting conference members to two contact practices per week. Some of these philosophies have started to spread across all levels of football, including the NFL where some teams have rethought the way practices are run.

Here is how the guidelines read, according to the NCAA;

  • Preseason: For days when schools schedule a two-a-day practice, live contact practices are only allowed in one practice. A maximum four live contact practices may occur in a given week, and a maximum of 12 total may occur in the preseason. Only three practices (scrimmages) would allow for live contact in greater than 50 percent of the practice schedule.
  • Inseason, postseason and bowl season: There may be no more than two live contact practices per week.
  • Spring practice: Of the 15 allowable sessions that may occur during the spring practice season, eight practices may involve live contact; three of these live contact practices may include greater than 50 percent live contact (scrimmages). Live contact practices are limited to two in a given week and may not occur on consecutive days.

When it comes to player safety, especially regarding concussions and other forms of head trauma, there really is no bad way to go about establishing new guidelines. The Pac-12 changed their habits last season and any fears about the level of play may have been put to rest as the conference continued to gain praise on a national competitive level. How will these new guidelines be received throughout the country? That remains to be seen, but feel free to share your reactions in the comment section.

Reports: Josh Jackson’s academic issues resolved, QB remains part of Virginia Tech football team

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Hokie Nation, it appears you can unofficially breathe a huge sigh of relief.

Rumors were swirling earlier this month that Josh Jackson‘s eligibility at Virginia Tech for the 2018 season was up in the air over unspecified academic issues.  While there is nothing yet official from the school, multiple media outlets in the area are now reporting that whatever issues there were have been resolved and the starting quarterback remains a part of the team.

Bitter went on to write in an online story on the situation that “[t]here’s no indication he’ll face any type of suspension, meaning he most likely will be the starter for the Hokies’ opener at Florida State on Labor Day night.”

Suffice to say, this is a sizable development for the Hokies’ football fortunes in 2018.

As a redshirt freshman last season, Jackson started all 13 games for the 9-4 Hokies. He passed for 2,991 yards and ran for another 324 yards while accounting for 26 touchdowns — 20 passing, six rushing.  The yards were the most for an FBS freshman in 2017, while the touchdowns passes were the second-most at this level.

If Jackson had been ruled ineligible for the upcoming season, head coach Justin Fuente would’ve then turned to either redshirt freshman Hendon Hooker or redshirt junior Ryan Willis. The former hasn’t attempted a pass at the collegiate level, although the latter, a transfer from Kansas, passed for 2,530 yards on 432 pass attempts while with the Jayhawks.  Willis sat out the 2017 season to satisfy NCAA transfer rules.

UCF’s Michael Colubiale granted sixth season of eligibility

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The ever-benevolent NCAA continues to give, with UCF and one of its players the latest beneficiaries of The Association’s “never-ending” graciousness.

On his personal Twitter account late last week, Michael Colubiale announced that he has been informed by the NCAA that he has been granted a sixth season of eligibility. That ruling will allow the tight end to play the 2018 season for the Knights.

This upcoming season will serve as Colubiale’s final year of eligibility.

After missing the entire 2015 season due to injury, Colubiale played in all 25 games the last two years. He caught 10 passes for 221 yards and a touchdown in 2017, one season after he totaled two catches for 17 yards.

The ruling is a significant one for the Knights as they lost a combined 42 receptions for 479 yards and four touchdowns in 2017 at the tight end position due to the expired eligibility of Jordan Akins (30-459-4) and Jordan Franks (12-120). In fact, and aside from Colubiale, not a single tight end on UCF’s current roster has caught a pass at the FBS level.

FCS the landing spot for Michigan State transfer Kyonta Stallworth

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The eighth player to transfer from Michigan State this offseason has found himself a new college football home.
A Southern Illinois spokesperson confirmed to mlive.com that Kyonta Stallworth has transferred into their football program.  As the Missouri Valley Conference program plays at the FCS level, the offensive lineman-turned-defensive lineman will be eligible to play immediately in 2018 for the Salukis.
Including this coming season, the defensive tackle will have two years of eligibility remaining.
The move to SIU comes nearly four weeks after Stallworth took to Twitter to announce his decision to transfer from the Spartans. No specific reason for the move away from East Lansing was given at the time.
A four-star member of MSU’s 2015 recruiting class, Stallworth was rated as the No. 8 guard in the country and the No. 3 player at any position in the state of Michigan.  Only one player in the Spartans’ class that year was rated higher than Stallworth — running back LJ Scott.
After redshirting as a true freshman, Stallworth played in seven games the past two seasons.  Five of those appearances came in 2017, a season in which he was credited with 11 tackles (seven assisted, four solo) and a pair of quarterback hurries.  All told, he finished the MSU portion of his playing career with 12 tackles.

Texas Tech lands commitment from 6-foot-11 offensive lineman

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It’s been a day full of massive news in college football. After word broke that Alabama has offered a 6-foot-7 offensive lineman entering his freshman year of high school, Texas Tech did the Tide one better.

On Sunday, the Red Raiders landed the commitment of 6-foot-11, 345-pound offensive lineman Trevor Roberson.

A 3-star member of the Class of 2019, Roberson also reported offers from Arkansas, Baylor, Oklahoma State and others. He is the sixth member of Kliff Kingsbury‘s 2019 class, and the fourth player to pledge in the past week.

“The crowd was huge, first off. The crowd was amazing,” Roberson told 247Sports of a visit to see the Red Raiders’ loss to Oklahoma State last season. “If there were empty seats, you couldn’t see them. It was tremendous. My favorite part was seeing the players, I love watching those guys play. It’s truly amazing to see how, for me personally, these college athletes started from the same position I did, and you see where they are now. They have a lot of heart. Texas Tech is an amazing school and an amazing program, and I’ve always felt that way about them.”

Roberson hails from Wellington, Texas, a Panhandle town between Amarillo and Norman, Okla. Wellington claims just 2,100 residents, so Roberson may be the biggest thing to come out of his hometown — literally and figuratively.