Report: Air Force’s football and athletics culture requires a deeper investigation

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Disturbing findings within the Air Force athletics culture will lead to a more thorough examination of the program, including the football team. An investigative report by The Gazette found Air Force cadet athletes violated the academy’s honor code by committing sexual assaults, drug use, cheating and more. At the same time, an apparent concern over winning football games and raising more money from alumni donors took preference over taking action against the student-athletes. Superintendent Lt. Gen. Michelle Johnson informed The Gazette the Inspector General has been requested to conduct a deeper investigation of the athletic department.

The biggest part of the report centers around a wild party from 2011, which resulted in the probing of 32 cadets. The party reportedly involved to rampant drug use and alleged date rape drinks leading to sexual intercourse. Half of those questioned (16) about the activities at the party were members of the Air Force football team. Three of the 32 questioned cadets would later be court-martialed, sentenced and discharged, including a pair of football players. Two more football players received administrative punishment and were dismissed. Air Force’s athletic director, Hans Mueh, claimed to not know anything about the 2011 investigation conducted by the Office of Special Investigations until after Air Force played in the 2011 Military Bowl in Washington D.C. (a 42-41 loss to Toledo). The football players involved with the questioning in the investigation played in that bowl game.

Another investigation into activities of football players was later labeled a success by OSI. According to the report, OSI special agent Brandon Enos helped lead Operation Gridiron at the United States Air Force Academy, which identified and removed a total of 18 football players from the program as a result of their involvement in various drug-related use and distribution and sexual assaults.

The damage does not end there for Air Force, at least as far as football is concerned. More details from the investigative report suggest Air Force allowed students to enroll at the academy that did not meet the honor code, many coming after 2008 following the hiring of head coach Troy Calhoun. Calhoun is among the highest paid employee at Air Force. Mueh again falls under scrutiny for allowing standards to be lowered in athletics with regard to the honor code.

There is also the connection to Lt. General Mike Gould, who was in his position during the time of much of the reported misconduct at Air Force. According to the report, Gould emailed instructions to someone tied to a raid on Air Force dorms for suspected drug use demanding a short report lacking enough details to avoid an increased concern to the Pentagon. Why is this rather significant?

And now the College Football Playoff has its first scandal in need of addressing. That is important on a smaller scale though, of course. For now, the concern needs to be placed on the Air Force athletics department. This comes at a time when the actions within the nation’s military has fallen under tighter scrutiny in recent years with issues like hazing and sexual assault. All services and academies continue to face their issues and sometimes ripping off the band-aid is what is needed for sweeping changes to be made.

You can read the entire investigative report for more information and details regarding various concerns within the Air Force athletics community.

Texas to honor ’69 champs with throwback uniforms

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Some traditional powers in college football (Notre Dame, Ohio State, Nebraska) can get away with changing their uniforms every so often. Others cannot, or are simply too timid to try (Texas, Alabama, Penn State). Yet almost all of them get the itch to switch things up from time to time, so they end up mining their not-that-different past for some much-needed variety.

Such is the case at Texas, where the No. 15 Longhorns will wear 1969 throwbacks against Kansas.

The ’69 season was a nice one at Texas, where Darrell Royal‘s ‘Horns scored wins over No. 8 Oklahoma, No. 2 Arkansas (in arguably the biggest game in college football history) and No. 9 Notre Dame en route to the school’s first of two straight national championships and second of four overall.

1969 was also a special season for all of college football, as it marked the 100th anniversary of the sport’s birth. This year marks the 50th anniversary of the ’69 title and the 150th anniversary of college football. Like many teams, Texas has noted the sport’s 150th birthday by wearing the CFB150 patch on its chests, but that and all other pieces of flair (save the Nike swoosh, of course) are gone in favor of 1960s simplicity.

The 1969 Texas team is also notable in that it is the last all-white national championship team in college football.

The uniforms and the players wearing them will hit the field at 7 p.m. ET on Saturday (LHN).

WVU WR Tevin Bush enters transfer portal

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West Virginia running back Tevin Bush has entered the transfer portal, head coach Neal Brown has announced.

“Tevin has had a rough few months,” Brown told WV Metro News. “He has had lingering foot and heel issues. He’s going to redshirt the rest of this season and enter the transfer portal. I support that decision. He wants to go closer to home.”

The New Orleans native has spent time at running back and in the slot for the Mountaineers. He played nine games at running back as a freshman in 2017, totaling 20 carries for 81 yards and four catches for 15 yards.

He moved to wide receiver last season and snared 14 passes for 209 yards in 11 games while rushing six times for 103 yards, including a career-long 79-yarder against Baylor. Bush scored one career touchdown as a Mountaineer.

Bush totaled six receptions for 95 yards and a touchdown and three carries for 15 yards in four games this season. He will be able to count this season as a redshirt and play elsewhere in 2020, most likely a program in or around Louisiana.

Four-star 2019 corner tweets transfer from Arkansas

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For the second time today, there’s some Arkansas personnel news on which to touch.

Monday, Chad Morris confirmed that linebacker D’Vone McClure left the team to deal with family responsibilities.  Later that same day, teammate Devin Bush took to Twitter to announce that, “[a]fter speaking with my parents and coaches, I’ve made the decision to officially enter the transfer portal.”

A four-star member of the Razorbacks’ 2019 recruiting class, Bush was rated as the No. 28 corner in the country and the No. 13 player at any position in the state of Louisiana.  The New Orleans native was the highest-rated defensive signee in Arkansas’ class this year.

Because he played in just four games this year, Bush will be able to take a redshirt for his true freshman season.

WR Weston Bridges is fourth Michigan State player to enter portal

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In the offseason, Weston Bridges changed positions.  Midway through the 2019 season, it appears Bridges is now set to change schools.

On his personal Twitter account Monday afternoon, Bridges indicated that he has decided to take his leave of Michigan State and transfer to an undetermined elsewhere.  It has subsequently been confirmed that the wide receiver is headed into the NCAA transfer database.

A three-star member of the Spartans’ 2017 recruiting class, Bridges was rated as the No. 31 running back in the country and the No. 24 player at any position in the state of Ohio.  During the spring this year, Bridges moved from running back to receiver.

After redshirting as a true freshman, Bridges carried the ball 16 times for 53 yards last season.  He was suspended for a late-September game because of unspecified violations of team rules.

Bridges is the fourth MSU football player to enter the portal since the 2019 season kicked off, joining linebacker Brandon Bouyer-Randle (HERE) as well as a pair of running backs in Connor Heyward (HERE) and La’Darius Jefferson (HERE).