CFT Preseason Top 25: No. 25 Iowa

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2013 record: 8-5 overall, 5-3 in Big Ten (3rd in Legends division)
2013 postseason: Outback Bowl vs. LSU (21-14 loss)
2013 final AP/coaches’ ranking: unranked/unranked
Head coach: Kirk Ferentz (108-79 overall; 108-79 in 16 years at Iowa)
Offensive coordinator: Greg Davis (3rd year at Iowa)
2013 offensive rankings: 51st rushing offense (179.85 ypg); 95th passing offense (197.1 ypg); 85th total offense (376.9 ypg); 79th scoring offense (26.3 ppg)
Returning offensive starters: 8
Defensive coordinator: Phil Parker (16th year at Iowa)
2013 defensive rankings: 19th rushing defense (128.38 ypg); 9th passing defense (174.7 ypg); 6th total defense (303.1 ypg); 9th scoring defense (18.9 ppg)
Returning defensive starters: 5
Location: Iowa City, Iowa
Stadium: Kinnick Stadium (70,585; Field Turf)
Last conference title: 2004 (split with Michigan)

THE GOOD
Iowa returns eight starters on offense, including quarterback Jake Rudock, leading rusher Mark Weisman, leading receiver Kevonte Martin-Manley and three offensive linemen.The schedule is also favorable by avoiding conference games against Ohio State, Michigan State, Michigan and Penn State. In addition, Iowa gets Wisconsin and Nebraska at home in what could turn out to be two crucial games in the Big Ten West at the end fo the season.

THE BAD
Although Iowa generally has a solid defensive unit, there are some holes to fill on that side of the football in 2014. Iowa loses six starters from last year’s team, including all three linebackers and a pair of defensive backs. Three of those lost defensive leaders accounted for 322 tackles last season. Four of the top five tacklers from last year’s team are gone, which means there is room for new players to step up into big roles this fall at Iowa. It is a considerable amount of turnover for the Hawkeyes defense, but Iowa will have some time to figure it all out before Big Ten play.

THE UNKNOWN
Is this an Iowa team that resurfaces every few years to make a Big Ten run when few are paying attention, or will this be another year of mediocre to slightly above average play? Health stability is always a concern for Iowa it seems and it could quickly derail any high hopes Iowa may have for this season. The schedule sets things up nicely for Iowa, but the Hawkeyes still have to prove they can grab a hold of things. Ball State may not be a pushover but they will not be Northern Illinois (which beat Iowa last season). Iowa State can always be a toss-up it seems, and a road game at Pittsburgh should be a good test before Big Ten play. Can Iowa get out of that early stretch without a blemish or will they be limping into Big Ten play already?

MAKE-OR-BREAK GAME: at Minnesota
Iowa’s schedule is very favorable when it comes to Big Ten play. As long as the Hawkeyes can avoid slipping up before November, the final two games of the season at home against Wisconsin and Nebraska could leave the Hawkeyes in control of the West Division championship. But before Iowa can worry about that they will have to come out of Minnesota with a win on November 8. If all goes to plan before then, this will be Iowa’s last real road challenge before entering the final stretch of the season. Iowa has won each of the previous two meetings with the Gophers by double digits, but they will not be able to get too confident this season with so much possibly on the line. Win and the Big Ten West could be theirs to lose. Lose and they will likely lose ground to Wisconsin and/or Nebraska with time running out.

HEISMAN HOPEFUL: RB Mark Weisman
Weisman for Heisman? That may be a reach, but his importance to Iowa team this year is not to be taken lightly.  After leading the Hawkeyes in rushing with 975 yards and eight touchdowns a year ago, Mark Weisman appears to be ready to lead the charge on the ground once again this fall. When Iowa succeeds it is often because they have a talented running back in the backfield. Weisman may not be as high-profile as Wisconsin’s Melvin Gordon or Nebraska’s Ameer Abdullah, but he should be expected to pile up some good yardage this season for Iowa.

(Click HERE for the CFT 2014 Preseason Preview Repository)

World of college football reacts to tragic deaths of Kobe Bryant, 13-year-old daughter in helicopter crash

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As is the case across the entire world of sports, college football is reacting to the devastating news involving Kobe Bryant.

Sunday morning, Bryant was one of nine people killed — initial reports had the number at five — in a helicopter crash in Calabasas, California, on his way to a travel basketball event.  The former NBA superstar, who retired from the sport following the 2015-16 season, was 41.

Adding to the devastation, one of Bryant’s daughters, who was also a player on her father’s travel basketball team, 13-year-old Gianna Maria Bryant, was killed in the crash as well.

Kobe and Gianna are survived by wife/mother Vanessa and three daughters/sisters.  The oldest is 17, the youngest will turn one in June.

In the hours after the heartbreaking news was confirmed, the world of college football mourned the passing of Kobe Bryant. Below is just a sampling.

 

Georgia state rep. proposes pay-for-play legislation with a twist that will make no one happy

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Ever since California’s SB 206 passed last September, more than a dozen states followed with their own versions of the Golden State’s Fair Pay to Play Act, to go along with a number of concurrent pushes in Washington. No matter your stance on the pay-for-play issue or what side of the political aisle you sit on, it seems we can all agree that politicians are not the people to solve this issue, and yet the NCAA kept dragging its feet, and dragging its feet, and draaaaggging its feeetttt and, well, here we are. And Sandra Scott‘s bill a large reason why.

Scott, a state representative in Georgia (D-Rex) has introduced HB 766, a type of compromise bill that will make no one happy.

The appeal, at least from the outside, of California’s SB 206, is that it would allow college athletes to capitalize on their popularity during the lifetime of that popularity while costing the school very little money, since the money would come from third-parties.

Scott’s bill does neither. In fact, it goes out of its way to do the opposite.

According to HB 766, Georgia would require its schools to set aside a third of all monies earned in postseason play into an escrow account, which would then be given to players upon graduation.

Read for yourself below.

To recap, Scott’s bill would cost the schools millions of dollars and also shut out a lot of the players who generate those millions. Why should, say, Jake Fromm be barred from having a hand in the money he produced for Georgia just because he went pro?

In short, Scott’s (well-meaning) bill would anger both schools and athletes while continuing the overly paternalistic attitudes adults have adopted toward college athletes that applies to no other demographic in college sports.

Trey Holtz set to join father Skip’s staff at Louisiana Tech

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Coaching is the family business for the Holtz family, and now two of them will work under the same roof.

As first reported by Bleed Tech Blue, Louis Leo Holtz, Jr., better known as Skip Holtz, has hired Louis Leo Holtz III, better known as Trey Holtz. The younger Holtz will serve as Louisiana Tech’s wide receivers coach.

Trey Holtz played his college ball at Texas under Mack Brown and Charlie Strong. A reserve quarterback, Holtz appeared in 23 games as a holder in 2015-16.

He then moved into the family business at Ohio State, where he worked as a graduate assistant for the past three years. Holtz worked with the Buckeyes’ running backs and tight ends, but will now coach receivers for his father’s staff. He replaces Todd Fitch, who left to become the offensive coordinator at Vanderbilt.

For the Holtz family, Skip hiring Trey is an act of history repeating itself. After serving as a GA at Florida State and Colorado State, Skip’s first full-time job came on his father Lou Holtz‘s staff as Notre Dame’s wide receivers coach in 1990. Skip was promoted to offensive coordinator in 1992 and became Connecticut’s head coach in 1994.

Two workers injured by falling beams at Bryant-Denny Stadium renovation

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Two workers were injured Saturday by falling beams at Bryant-Denny Stadium.

The workers were laboring on a manlift when a pair of beams fell and struck the lift, trapping the workers, who were not named.

Firefighters responded around 5 p.m. Saturday to extract the workers, who were “seriously injured,” according to AL.com. After they were extracted, the workers were transported to DCH Regional Medical Center. Their condition was not known as of press time.

The workers were working on a $92.5 million phase of renovation to Bryant-Denny Stadium, announced in last fall. Crimson Tide AD Greg Byrne said in September that construction would be expedited to meet an aggressive schedule.

“We realized this is an aggressive construction schedule we are going to be talking about. However, our contractors are confident. They have expressed they will deliver this on time,” he said at the time.