Mariota’s 5 TD night pushes Heisman buzz, keeps No. 6 Oregon in playoff hunt

8 Comments

For the second time this season, Oregon quarterback Marcus Mariota threw five touchdowns. For the first time this season, he was intercepted. It was another wild night for offensive football as No. 6 Oregon (7-1, 4-1 Pac-12) pulled away from upset-minded California (4-4, 2-4 Pac-12) Friday night in the first college football game ever played in new Levi’s Stadium. The Ducks continued to roll with a 59-41 victory in a game that saw plenty of offense.

Mariota continued on his Heisman campaign with 326 passing yards, 5 touchdowns and 36 rushing yards as Oregon proved to have just a bit more offense than a rising Cal program. The game was a back-and-forth contest with the offenses trading scores on the game’s first four possessions. After going down 14-7 in the first quarter, Oregon rattled off 24 straight points to seemingly take control of the game. Cal answered before halftime though by picking up a pair of touchdowns in the span of a little under two minutes, thanks in part to an Oregon fumble. With the lead down to three points (31-28), Mariota led the Ducks down field to pad the lead before the break. He did not have to far to go either, as the Ducks started at their 40-yard line. Three plays later, Mariota connected with Dwayne Stanford for a 24-yard touchdown and a 10-point lead.

After halftime Mariota and Byron Marshall hooked up for a 54-yard touchdown pass to quickly get on the board in the second half. At this point Oregon seemed to have a hold of the game. A short touchdown run from Royce Freeman midway through the third quarter gave Oregon a comfortable 52-28 lead.

California went into this game knowing they would be able to move the football and score some points against Oregon. The Ducks have been vulnerable to offenses of this nature in the past few years, but the Ducks still have an overall advantage in talent to be able to overcome holes on defense most of the time. California quarterback Jared Goff ran the offense of Sonny Dykes very well against Oregon by throwing for 360 yards and two touchdowns without an interception. A questionable fumble that was upheld by a video replay hurt Goff and Cal’s chances to make things a little more interesting in the first half. Goff may have been moving his arm forward as the Oregon defense knocked the ball out of his hand. The video replay was not very definitive either way on the play, but because the ruling on the field was a fumble it was far from enough to overturn the call. If the call had been there was forward motion of Goff’s arm, video replay still may have been questionable enough to not overturn the call for a fumble either.

Since losing to Arizona, Oregon has won three straight games in Pac-12 play. At this point, Oregon looks to be the team to beat in the Pac-12 and should be on track for a return trip to the Pac-12 championship game after missing the last two years (Stanford represented the Pac-12 North each of the past two seasons). Next up for Oregon will be a home game against Stanford. The Cardinal have been a trip for Oregon the past couple of years. This should be the biggest hurdle for Mariota and head coach Mark Helfrich to get over before making any case for a spot in the College Football Playoff. Oregon hosts Stanford on November 1.

At some point, Oregon may have to play some defense, but with what is sitting in front of them the rest of the way into the postseason, these Ducks should keep flying.

Meanwhile, California is still sitting two wins shy of becoming eligible for postseason play. The BEars will have quite an uphill battle to get those two wins too. The next two games will be played on the road, first at Oregon State and then at USC. The season wraps up at home with games against Stanford and BYU. Stanford’s defense could be tough, but the Cardinal have no offense. BYU was shredded Friday night by Boise State and continue to be in some form of free fall mode since losing quarterback Taysom Hill.

California has enough to get two more wins, but they may not come easily.

Buyouts and Chip Kelly’s grocery bill lands UCLA with $18.9 million deficit in 2019

Getty Images
Leave a comment

A difficult year for UCLA on the football field was just as difficult on the balance sheet.

According to details obtained by the San Jose Mercury News, the Bruins reported a shocking $18.9 million deficit for the recent 2018-19 fiscal year. This was the result of $108.4 million in revenue and $127.3 million in outgoing expenses.

“A confluence of events over the past two years led us to this point,” AD Dan Guerrero said in a statement to the paper, “and while it is unusual for us, we expect this shortfall can be mitigated.

“The investments made into our football and men’s basketball programs will pay off, ticket sales will normalize and one-time expenses will be paid.”

Those investments included a nearly 30 percent increase in the football program’s funding since the hire of Chip Kelly in late 2017. While former head coach Jim Mora’s buyout (nearly $12.5 million) was recorded in the previous year’s budget, the effects of it naturally carried over and created an even tricker situation when basketball coach Steve Alford’s buyout was thrown in for 2019.

In addition to buyouts, the grocery bill seemed to play a pretty big factor in the deficit as well. While this doesn’t appear to just be the case of switching from Albertsons to Whole Foods, under Kelly the program’s budget for nutrition ballooned from just a shade under $1 million to nearly $5.4 million last year. Add in decreased ticket sales in football (down $3.5 million from projections) after a disappointing year and increased costs from other places in the department and you can see how UCLA quickly went from being in the black into the red.

Needless to say, that puts even more pressure on Kelly and company to help turn things around in 2020. Things in Westwood haven’t been rosy in some time in the major revenue-producing sports and it seems it’s finally caught up to the folks in powder blue.

Former UNC head coach Larry Fedora expected to take Baylor OC job

Getty Images
Leave a comment

New Baylor football head coach Dave Aranda has been busy assembling his new coaching staff and filling it with familiar faces from his days at LSU.

One looming question that was still in the wind however was just what direction the defensive-minded coach would be taking on the other side of the ball. Now it appears we know.

As first reported by Yahoo! Sports and confirmed by a number of other outlets, the Bears are set to bring in former North Carolina head coach Larry Fedora as the program’s new offensive coordinator.

Fedora is no stranger to the Lone Star State, having grown up in College Station and spent the 2019 season as an offensive analyst at Texas. He also coached at Baylor from 1991-1996 as a position coach responsible for, at times, the wide receivers, tight ends and running backs.

The 57 year old previously served as OC at Middle Tennessee, Florida and Oklahoma State and is well versed in running a high-flying spread offense. He took over as head coach of Southern Miss and quickly got the program back on track before heading to Chapel Hill. While in charge of the Tar Heels, he guided UNC to a 79-62 record that included a division title in 2015.

While it’s assumed that Fedora will be calling plays while in Waco, he does join a previously announced hire in Jorge Munoz on the Bears staff. The latter was a coordinator himself at UL-Lafayette and recently served as an analyst at LSU helping develop Heisman Trophy winner Joe Burrow.

Former ACC commissioner Gene Corrigan passes away at 91

Getty Images
Leave a comment

The ACC has lost a pivotal figure in the league’s history.

The conference confirmed that former commissioner Gene Corrigan passed away on Friday night at the age of 91 in his Charlottesville, Virginia home.

“When Gene hired me at the University of Virginia straight out of graduate school, it was one of the luckiest days of my life,” said current ACC Commissioner John Swofford in a statement. “That day began a relationship and mentorship that lasted nearly half a century. Simply put, Gene was one of the most remarkable individuals, and leaders, I have ever known. His impact on the ACC and college athletics was profound and immeasurable, only surpassed by his impact on the individuals he positively affected – and there are a multitude of us. I will miss him immensely, but I am so grateful to have had him as a mentor, boss, friend and colleague for so many years. Nora and I spent several hours with Gene and Lena at their home in Charlottesville last fall. The time was truly special. Nora joins me in extending our hearts and prayers to Lena and the extraordinary Corrigan family.”

Corrigan served as athletic director at Washington and Lee University, Virginia and Notre Dame before taking over at the league office in Greensboro. A Duke graduate, he came up in college athletics originally as a lacrosse and soccer coach in the 1950’s and 1960’s before eventually moving full-time into administration.

After leaving South Bend to become the ACC’s commissioner in 1987, Corrigan engineered a series of key moves that resulted in the league that many see today. Most notably this included the addition of Florida State to the ranks in 1990 and helping found the Football Bowl Alliance, a precursor to what would become the BCS.

Corrigan is survived by his wife, seven children, including current N.C. State athletic director Boo Corrigan.

Jerry Jeudy, AJ Dillon, Eno Benjamin and more set for State Farm All-Star Football Challenge

Photo by Todd Kirkland/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images
1 Comment

It may fly under the radar for most, but the 22nd annual State Farm All-Star Football Challenge is set to take place on Jan. 31 at AT&T Stadium in Arlington, Texas. The skills competition will pit 24 college football stars in a team event. Among those participating in this year’s challenge will be Boston College running back AJ Dillon, Penn State defensive end Yetur Gross-Matos, Oklahoma linebacker Kenneth Murray, and Alabama wide receiver Jerry Jeudy.

Five teams representing each of the power five conferences will consist of players from those respective conferences: ACC, Big 12, Big Ten, Pac-12, and SEC. A sixth team of “wild card” players will be comprised of players from the Group of Five or below. This year’s wild card players will come from the Mountain West Conference (Utah State QB Jordan Love, Boise State DE Curtis Weaver), Conference USA (FAU TE Harrison Bryant) and the South Atlantic Conference of Division 2 (Lenoir-Rhyne S Kyle Dugger).

The individual events included in the competition are a quarterback accuracy contest, obstacle course, strength challenge, and a hands competition. A team event will complete the overall event.

TEAM ACC
Cam Akers, RB, Florida State
AJ Dillon, RB, Boston College
Bryce Perkins, QB, Virginia
Jason Strowbridge, DL, North Carolina

TEAM BIG TEN
Zack Baun, LB, Wisconsin
Yetur Gross-Matos, DE, Penn State
KJ Hamler, WR, Penn State
Nate Stanley, QB, Iowa

TEAM BIG 12
Ross Blacklock, DT, TCU
Kenneth Murray, LB, Oklahoma
Jalen Reagor, WR, TCU
Carter Stanley, QB, Kansas

TEAM PAC-12
Salvon Ahmed, RB, Washington
Bradlee Anae, DE, Utah
Eno Benjamin, RB, Arizona State
Anthony Gordon, QB, Washington State

TEAM SEC
Nick Coe, DE, Auburn
Jerry Jeudy, WR, Alabama
Terrell Lewis, LB, Alabama
Riley Neal, QB, Vanderbilt

TEAM WILD CARD
Harrison Bryant, TE, Florida Atlantic
Kyle Dugger, S, Lenoir-Rhyne
Jordan Love, QB, Utah State
Curtis Weaver, DE, Boise State