Brian Kelly on Irish’s QBs: ‘I’d take our two over Ohio State’s’

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This certainly has the potential to end well in the comments section — and by “end well” I mean “be a train wreck.”

As everybody knows, one of the biggest storylines in college football throughout the offseason has been Ohio State’s three-headed quarterback competition, which won’t commence in earnest until summer camp rolls around in August. And not only will it be a three-man battle, it will include what may well be the most talented collection of quarterbacks ever assembled on one team at the collegiate level: Cardale Jones, the hero of the Buckeyes’ postseason run viewed as one of a handful of preseason contenders for the 2015 Heisman Trophy; J.T. Barrett, the 2014 starter who led the Buckeyes to the cusp of a Big Ten title and spot in the College Football Playoff before fracturing his ankle in the regular-season finale against Michigan; and Braxton Miller, the two-time Big Ten Offensive Player of the Year who was one of the favorites for the 2014 Heisman before reinjuring his shoulder during summer camp last August and missing the entire season.

With that as a backdrop, and as relayed by our own JJ Stankevitz for his main gig at CSNChicago, Brian Kelly was asked during a Wednesday press conference which unit’s depth on his Notre Dame squad has pleased him the most. Unprompted, the Irish head coach brought up OSU’s quarterback situation in pumping up his own group of signal-callers, Everett Golson and Malik Zaire.

“At the quarterback position, maybe other than Ohio State, I would take our two quarterbacks,” Kelly said. “And I would take our two over Ohio State’s. In terms of depth, I don’t know if anybody has a better situation than we do in terms of the two quarterbacks we have.”

The fact that Kelly pumped up his own players publicly isn’t a surprise as coaches all across the country do it on an almost daily basis, especially in the spring. The fact that Kelly, unsolicited, brought up OSU and claimed he’d take his guys over Urban Meyer‘s, though, is head-scratching and chuckle-inducing to say the least.

While Golson/Zaire are far from middle school-level talents, they’re also far from the Jones/Barrett/Miller triumvirate when it comes to on-field production and success — 38-3 with that starting trio the past three years, three division titles, one conference championship, one national championship. Granted, Golson helped lead the Irish to the 2012 BCS title game, but still, there’s not a coach in the country who, if he’s being honest with himself, wouldn’t trade his situation depth-wise for the Buckeyes’.

It’s interesting to note that Kelly’s very public praise comes amidst rumors that bubbled yet again to the surface that Golson may be considering a transfer. Maybe it’s merely a coincidence, but maybe it’s Kelly’s way of publicly telling Golson that he does indeed want him in South Bend — and, in the process, leaving him more than one viable option at the position heading into the new season.

FAU TE John Raine awarded another year of eligibility

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We overlooked this one earlier in the week, but it’s a rather sizable piece of official news for Lane Kiffin‘s Florida Atlantic football program.

By way of the Palm Beach Post Tuesday, it has been confirmed that John Raine was recently awarded a fifth season of eligibility.  The ruling will allow the senior tight end to play for the Owls in 2020.

A broken ankle cost Raine all but four games of his true freshman season in 2016, paving the way for the NCAA to rule in his favor on his appeal for another year of eligibility.

“I’m super excited about it,” Raine told the Post about the NCAA’s approval of a medical hardship waiver. “I love being here; I love playing football.”

With two regular-season games plus a bowl remaining, Rainer has already set career-highs in receptions (26), receiving yards (426) and receiving touchdowns (five).  The touchdowns are tops on the Owls.

This weekend, a Notre Dame home game won’t be sold out for first time since 1973

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All good things, streaks in this particular case, must come to an end.

Saturday afternoon in South Bend, Notre Dame will play host to Navy in the 93rd renewal of their football rivalry.  And, according to the South Bend Tribune, the game won’t be played in front of a sellout crowd at Notre Dame Stadium (capacity: 77,622), which is actually a startling development.

This weekend, you see, will mark the first time since Thanksgiving Day 1973 (vs. Air Force) that the Fighting Irish haven’t sold out a home football game, snapping a streak of 273 straight sellouts.  Ahead of that streak being snapped, the Irish’s athletic director for the past dozen years, Jack Swarbrick, attempted to downplay the development.

From the Tribune:

It was never sort of important to me to keep it alive, but I understand why other people thought so. It’s a point of distinction to a lot of people and our fans.

“For me it’s always been: What’s the stadium environment like? Are we creating a great environment for our team and for our student-athletes? That you can say it’s also sold out is sort of a byproduct of that.

“But if my choice is (77,622) people in an environment that’s not really good versus 75,000 in a raucous environment, I’ll take the latter every time.

Notre Dame’s 237-game streak had been the second-longest active streak in college football behind Nebraska’s 373, which will move to 374 when Big Red hosts Wisconsin this weekend. The last time the Cornhuskers failed to sellout Memorial Stadium was during the 1962 season.

Four finalists named for 2019 Paul Hornung Award

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The field for the award that fetes the nation’s most versatile college football player has been whittled down significantly.

Earlier Thursday, the Louisville Sports Commission announced the four finalists for the 2019 Paul Hornung Award that have been chosen by the 17-member selection committee.  And (surprise!), all four of the finalists come from Power Five conferences: Lynn Bowden Jr. (Kentucky), Clyde Edwards-Helaire (LSU), Joe Reed (Virginia) and Wan’Dale Robinson (Nebraska).

All four of the finalists come from the offensive side of the ball and have spent time as return specialists as well.  Because of injuries at the position, Bowden, listed as a wide receiver to start the season, has started the last three games at quarterback for UK, with the Wildcats going 2-1 in that span.

Reed is primarily a wide receiver and Edwards-Helaire a running back, while Robinson has split his time between both positions.

The 2018 winner of the Hornung Award was Purdue’s Rondale Moore, who likely would’ve been given serious finalist consideration again this year if not for his season essentially being derailed by a lingering hamstring injury.

For all of the statistical particulars for each candidate, click HERE the award’s press release:

 

Texas’ Jalen Green apologizes for vicious hit that angered K-State

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It appears Kansas State will have to settle for a mea culpa.

In the second half of last Saturday’s game, Texas cornerback Jalen Green (pictured) leveled K-State wide receiver Wykeen Gill (not pictured) on a play away from the ball and was ejected from the contest after (eventually) being flagged for targeting.  The play will cost Green the first half of UT’s game this Saturday against Iowa State per NCAA targeting rules, but will likely cost Gill at least one full game as he will be sidelined for the Week 12 matchup with West Virginia as the receiver is currently in concussion protocol.

That disparity didn’t sit well with K-State’s head coach.

“It’s unfortunate because it was away from the play, didn’t have anything to do with the play, and Wykeen is probably going to miss a game,” Chris Klieman stated at his weekly press conference Tuesday. “When you have a hit like that and somebody only misses a half, I don’t think that’s very fair.”

Wednesday afternoon, Green issued an apology in which he stated, in part, that he “realize[s] how it may have looked” but “I do want everyone to know I was not trying to take a cheap shot.”

As for “not trying to take a cheap shot,” you be the judge.