Dissecting Nick Saban’s response to SEC misconduct transfer policy

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Sometimes it does not take much to get Alabama head coach Nick Saban going off on a tangent about any issue on his mind. He did just that today when asked about the SEC’s new policy banning transfers previously disciplined for serious misconduct. Asked if he was in favor of the new rule, Saban voiced his concerns regarding the rule and the limits it has on he and other coaches while dropping the names Cam Newton and Nick Marshall and once again suggesting each power conference should abide by the same set of rules. Maybe he lost his train of thought while answering the question?

Let’s break down Saban’s response to the question, piece by piece because hoo boy there is much to digest. Quotes provided by Al.com;

“I understand what they’re trying to do, and I was really [looking] to clearly define exactly why — or what — I thought convicted and felonies should be involved in the rule, and I guess I got sort of misinterpreted. But one of the points that I tried to make was Cam Newton being in the SEC and Nick Marshall being in the SEC benefited the SEC, and it benefited those players.”

Correct, Newton and Marshall did benefit by playing in the SEC. The league’s notoriety surely helped elevate each player’s skills and prepared them for the next level in the NFL. And yes, each player had some issues in their past before landing at, that’s right, Alabama’s biggest rival in the SEC (Auburn). Except neither player was involved in a crime of the nature the new SEC rule was designed to address. No domestic violence or sexual assault issues followed either player that would, coincidentally, go on to defeat Saban’s Tide en route to an SEC championship during their respective runs as starting quarterback. But perhaps Saban was just using those random (or not so random) players as an example to address the theme of the policy. Saban’s larger sticking point is once again having each power conference play under the same rules, something that carries over from the satellite camp debate.

“What I’m most concerned about, I just think that we should have the same rules in the SEC as all the other Big 5 schools have because now we’re not just talking about the SEC. We’re talking about having a playoff — no different than the NFL. One division in the NFL doesn’t have different rules, different salary caps, different anything because the league knows that parity is the best competitive balance that you can create.”

This statement in particular will be what many latch on to, although it leaves room for interpretation. Is Saban saying every conference should adopt the SEC rules or merely saying each conference should use the same rules? In theory, and perhaps in an ideal world, Saban would have his way with everybody playing by the same set of rules, and this is one idea I happen to think Saban is right on the money about. However, who is to say the SEC rules should trump what the Big Ten plays by? Certainly not Saban.

Carry on Saban.

“So when we pass rules that other people that we have to compete against — and if that is really what’s best for the young people that we’re dealing with here, the student-athletes that we’re dealing with – then it should be best for everyone, or otherwise we shouldn’t do it. So I’m hopeful that some kind of way we’ll be able to get the Big 5 together — under the NCAA’s supervision — to try to create rules that we all see in the best interest of student-athletes, which I think we need to be thinking about here: Why do we do this? It is to benefit the student-athletes, to promote opportunities for the student-athletes.”

To his credit, Saban has established a track record of giving players second (or more) chances during his career. This has rubbed some the wrong way, but sometimes players do deserve another chance to thrive. This has gotten Saban into a sticky situation recently, but his overlaying theme is a good one. If we really are to believe these power conferences and programs have the best interests of the student-athletes and want to do everything possible to provide the best opportunities when they leave, then putting rules in place that allow for this to happen is needed, and preferably every conference would adopt the same rules. But we know this is not ultimately the case, which leaves Saban likely to stand alone with some of his opinions.

One more from Saban, again per Al.com

“Now, they have a responsibility and obligation to do the right thing. But what I see happening a lot is people don’t get convicted of things. They’re condemned as soon as they get arrested, and I’m not sure that’s fair because I don’t think that’s what our country was really built on.”

You may not like Saban for one reason or another, but he does go to the defense of his players, even when it may not be the wisest decision. Does he have other interests at heart? Undoubtedly. He is not the highest-paid head coach in college football for no reason, but he does seem to want the best for his players and the players on other programs as well. If it helps him win some extra games, then great. He may have gone off the mark in his response to this particular subject, but his statements should not go completely without merit.

Ex-Michigan RB Jordan Castleberry transfers to Maryland

Jordan Castleberry is transferring from Michigan to Maryland.
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After one semester at Michigan, freshman running back Jordan Castleberry has transferred to Maryland. Castleberry announced his transfer decision on his Twitter account on Thursday.

Castleberry originally committed to West Virginia during his recruiting process out of high school. Shortly after his commitment to West Virginia, Michigan became a more likely recruiting victor. Castleberry enrolled at Michigan in July 2019.

Castleberry did not play for Michigan in 2019, so he can use the 2019 season as a redshirt year to preserve a year of eligibility. However, NCAA transfer rules will force Castleberry to sit out the 2020 season. This will not make Castleberry eligible for Maryland until the 2021 season, at which point he will have three seasons of eligibility remaining.

Ruffin McNeill steps away from Oklahoma and football to be with family

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Family will always be more important than football, which is why Ruffin McNeill will be putting football on hold for an undetermined amount of time. Oklahoma announced on Thursday that assistant head coach and outside linebackers coach McNeill will leave football to help take care of his father.

“This was one of the hardest decisions I’ve had to make,” McNeill said in a statement released by Oklahoma. “But in the end, being near my dad was a necessary choice. Right now I need to be a son again and I need to help my brother and other family members take care of my dad, who is battling significant health issues. This is not retirement for me. I still want to coach in some form or fashion. But right now that can’t be the case. My focus needs to be on my dad back in North Carolina.”

“Ruffin means so much to me and to my family, and his family means so much to him,” Oklahoma head coach Lincoln Riley said in a statement. “I know his decision to leave OU was a very difficult one, but was one he felt he had to make.”

Although McNeill said this is not a retirement decision and expressed a desire to continue coaching when the time is right, Riley confirmed the Sooners will be looking for a replacement on the staff.

“I still want to coach in some form or fashion,” McNeill said. “But right now that can’t be the case.”

McNeill joined the Oklahoma coaching staff under Riley in 2017.

Miami’s QB revolving door sees Miami QB Jarren Williams reportedly entering transfer portal

Miami QB Jarren Williams could be entering the transfer portal.
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As we are quickly learning with the new day and age of college football, the minute a new quarterback arrives on the scene by way of a transfer, another may soon be on the move. Case in point, the current situation at Miami. Quarterback Jarren Williams will be entering the transfer portal, according to a report from Pat Forde of Sports Illustrated (via Twitter).

This news is hardly shocking given the attention given to the arrival by D’Eriq King from Houston earlier this week. King, a graduate transfer with immediate eligibility for this fall, is widely expected to step in and be Miami’s starting quarterback in 2020. Naturally, that would reduce the playing time Williams or any other Miami quarterback would be likely to see in the fall.

As a redshirt freshman in 2019, Williams was Miami’s leading passer with 2,187 yards and 19 touchdowns with seven interceptions. Williams is the only Miami quarterback who played in as many as 12 games last fall. If not for the addition of King, Williams may have been Miami’s most likely starter this season.

If Williams, a former four-star recruit in the Class of 2018, does indeed enter the transfer portal and ultimately decides to leave the Hurricanes for a new school, he will have to sit out the 2020 season. He would then have two years of eligibility left to use beginning in 2021.

Appalachian State and Liberty schedule future home-and-home series

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Appalachian State and Liberty have agreed to a future home-and-home series beginning in 2024. The schools announced future games to be played at Appalachian State in 2024 and at Liberty in 2025.

Appalachian State will host the Flames on Sept. 28, 2024. Liberty will host the Mountaineers the following fall on Oct. 11, 2025. Although this will not be the first time the two programs have played each other, it will mark the first time the two schools have faced each other with both being full FBS members.

Appalachian State and Liberty have faced off 10 times before. The most recent meeting in the series took place on Oct. 11, 2014, when Appalachian State was in its first season transitioning to from the FCS to the FBS. Liberty won an overtime shootout, 55-48. Liberty made the move from FCS to FBS in 2018 and is coming off its first bowl appearance, and victory, this past season against an Appalachian State rival, Georgia Southern.

“One of our goals in football scheduling is to play regional opponents to which our fan base can easily travel, and we’ve been able to do that with series like this one,” Appalachian State Director of Athletics Doug Gillin said in a released statement.

The addition of Liberty to Appalachian State’s future schedules fills the non-conference portion of the 2024 schedule for the reigning Sun Belt Conference champions. Appalachian State will also host East Tennessee State and play road games at Clemson and East Carolina in 2024. Appalachian State has two openings on its 2025 schedule, as of now. A home game against South Carolina is also booked for 2025 in addition to the road game at Liberty.

Liberty now has seven games booked for the 2024 season. The independent program will also host Coastal Carolina and Marshall and play road games at North Carolina, Eastern Michigan, Ball State, and UMass in 2024. Liberty still needs three more games to fill up the 2025 schedule, which is highlighted by road games at Army and Duke and a home game against Wake Forest.