CFT 2015 Preseason Preview: Top 25

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Yes, I know — another meaningless preseason poll tossed atop the overflowing pile of myriad other meaningless preseason polls. Hey, but at least this one isn’t SEC-heavy, so we have that going for us, which is nice.

OK, technically it’s not as SEC-heavy as others as this one contains “just” six teams from that conference and just two in the Top 10, the same number that comes from the Pac-12 for the former and one less than that league’s three in the latter.  For comparison’s sake, the preseason coaches’ poll included eight teams from the SEC (three in the Top 10), while the FWAA Super 16 poll saw five teams man those 16 spots (three Top 10 as well).

The Big 12 and Big Ten are also well-represented here, with four teams apiece making the cut.  The ACC brought up the Power Five rear with three teams included.

Rounding up the Top 25 conference-wise was one from the football independents (guess who!) and just one, Boise State, from the Group of Five.

Below is the entire Top 25, which was a consensus of polls cobbled together by myself, Kevin McGuire and three other individuals who would prefer to remain nameless.  Below that is where you may complain and/or whine and/or moan about how disrespected your team and/or your conference is.

Enjoy.  And complain/whine/moan.

1. Ohio State
With all due respect to those who think otherwise, how could any other be team be slotted in this spot? Not only are they the defending national champions who topped the Nos. 1 and 2 teams in the country to end the season — not to mention putting a 59-0 Big Ten title game pasting on a Wisconsin team that finished the season ranked 13th — but the Buckeyes return 15 starters from that squad. And then there’s the schedule. After a season-opening road trip to Blacksburg to take on Virginia Tech, the only team to leave a blemish on last year’s 14-1 mark, OSU will be double-digit favorites in every game leading up to the Nov. 21 home game against Michigan State. A repeat is far from a given, but given the combination of returning talent and schedule, it’s a given the Buckeyes will have a realistic shot at going back-to-back.

2. TCU
With Trevone Boykin back leading the offense as a Heisman Trophy favorite, you know the Horned Frogs should have plenty of sizzle on offense. TCU returns 10 starters on offense, and Gary Patterson should manage to keep the defense up to par to live up to Big 12 favorite hype. TCU could very well run the table this season, assuring the Big 12 of not being left out of the playoff this season.

cd0ymzcznguwzdbhnduynddiytjhm2yyzthlmtjjotqwyyznpwu4ntgznjrlzde2ndvmzdaxndvhmmy1nwrlywu3ymq13. Auburn
As detailed in the Six-Pack of Storylines, the SEC’s hope for a return to Title Land could very well hinge on the Tigers.  And the Tigers return to prominence could very well hinge on Will Muschamp, the fired Florida head coach who was brought in by Gus Malzahn to revamp and rebuild an AU defense that spewed water and oil all over the field in 2014.  The run-heavy spread offense should be in capable hands, even with new triggerman Jeremy Johnson under center; how the defense fares with Muschamp as its general will determine just how far Malzahn’s troops will go in 2015.

4. Oregon
The Ducks may still be the team to beat in the Pac-12, but the gap could be closing between Oregon and other Pac-12 contenders. Gone is Marcus Mariota but the offense should continue to pile up big numbers with FCS transfer Vernon Adams likely stepping in. There could be a bit of an adjustment, and an early road contest at Michigan State could be trouble, but Oregon should still manage to be among the best out west.

5. Michigan State
The Spartans have one of the best quarterbacks in the country in Connor Cook, a stout offensive line and, despite the loss of coordinator Pat Narduzzi and all four “No Fly Zone” starters in the secondary, one of the top defensive in the Big Ten, but could still find themselves anywhere from a one-loss team to one with three or more.  Why the latter projection?  One, they have to replace their top two running backs.  Two, their schedule includes road trips to Ohio State, in-state rival Michigan and Nebraska, as well as a home game against an Oregon team in Week 2 that will be a consensus Top-Five squad.

6. Arizona State
In a conference with plenty of quarterback talent, Arizona State’s Mike Bercovici could be one of the best. With a sturdy offensive line in front of him, Bercovici will still have to build some new chemistry with his receivers, but D.J. Foster is back and he can provide some options in Todd Graham’s offense. Defensively the Sun Devils bring back seven starters and should be one of the more stable defensive units outside of Utah and Stanford.

7. Alabama
Year-in and year-out, the Tide rolls out a defense that, regardless of how many key pieces need replaced, is one of the top units in the country; this year should be no different, especially as they return seven of 11 starters from a defense that finished sixth in the country in points allowed.  Like so many others, though, the Tide will need to replace their starting quarterback from the year before.  Making matters worse for the first-time starter, the Tide’s normally loaded backfield is lacking in running back depth.  Nick Saban‘s charges should still be one of the top teams in the country, but it could be a tougher struggle to get there than in past years.

Shawn Oakman
Shawn Oakman

8. Baylor
Baylor returns a loaded team in terms of starting experience with 17 back from last season’s co-Big 12 champions. The schedule, however, could be an obstacle for the Bears with road games at Oklahoma State and TCU coming in consecutive weeks in late November, immediately following a home game against Oklahoma. Shawn Oakman leads a feisty and underrated Baylor defense, but will the Bears be able to make enough big stops when needed the most?

9. USC
The Trojans are on the right path to the top of the Pac-12 mountain, but the preseason media poll may be a tad premature. USC may not even make it out of the Pac-12 South with how tough the division might be. Cody Kessler can put up Heisman numbers but must be more consistent to guide the Trojans to the conference title game. USC is getting there, but they are not quite there just yet.

10. Georgia Tech
Paul Johnson’s Yellow Jackets have become a bit of a trendy pick this offseason. Finishing the season with a win at Georgia, a close call against Florida State and a victory over Mississippi State in the Orange Bowl gives Georgia Tech momentum not seen in years. The formula for success will remain the same; grind yards out on the ground, mix in a surprise pass here and there and have the defense force some turnovers. Don’t expect much to be different this season.

11. Georgia
You’d be hard-pressed not to label the Bulldogs as the most complete team in the SEC East and the class of the division — even as Missouri has one the last two titles in that part of the conference.  Can, though, UGA — finally — take that step up to the next level and not only actually win a conference title but be a contender on the national stage?  One thing’s for certain: if they don’t, the fan base no longer has Mike Bobo to blame for whatever woes befall the program.

Everett Golson
Everett Golson

12. Florida State
The Seminoles lose a ton of starting experience from last year’s team, but Jimbo Fisher has built Florida State to the point where it can focus more on reloading rather than rebuilding. The talent pool can run that deep. The biggest addition to the program will come from Notre Dame transfer quarterback Everett Golson, who could step right into the starting role behind a new-look offensive line. The status of Dalvin Cook is a bit of a wild card entering the 2015 season.

13. Notre Dame
The conversation about Notre Dame begins with Malik Zaire, the redshirt sophomore quarterback who was officially handed the keys to Brian Kelly‘s offense when Everett Golson transferred over the summer. Zaire is a read-option whiz who should guide the Irish into running the ball more, as they did 51 times in an upset of LSU in the Music City Bowl last December. Zaire shouldn’t turn the ball over 22 times — as Golson did last year — which will be a boost for an offense returning one of the nation’s best offensive linemen (left tackle Ronnie Stanley) as well as its entire receiving corps. Notre Dame only has to replace two regular starters from its 2014 defense in nose guard Jarron Jones (injured) and cornerback Cody Riggs (graduated), though 26-game starter KeiVarae Russell returns to his cornerback perch following last year’s academic suspension. If the Irish defense can overcome some thin defensive line depth, guys like Jaylon Smith, Joe Schmidt, Russell and Max Redfield should help lead what could be one of the nation’s better back seven groups. The Irish face tough road games at Clemson and Stanford and draw Georgia Tech and USC at home, and how they fare in those four games will determine if Kelly’s sixth year in South Bend is a success or a disappointment.

14. Clemson
The Tigers were named the preseason favorite in the ACC, despite having just six returning starters in 2015. But the starters that do return are special, including quarterback Deshaun Watson. Many peg Watson as a strong Heisman contender. Fortunately, Dabo Swinney and company have recruited well over the years to give the Tigers some good depth this season that should grow as the season progresses. An early road trip to Louisville could be a litmus test for whether this team is worthy of the preseason hype or not.

15. Wisconsin
The biggest thing first-year head coach Paul Chryst has going for him is arguably UW’s placement in the weaker of the two divisions in the Big Ten.  Or perhaps that they, again, avoid having to face East powerhouses Ohio State and Michigan State.  While Corey Clement will help make it a near-seamless transition, the answer to the question of can Joel Stave be an adequate triggerman in a Badger offense expected to pass the ball more under Chryst could very well determine where in the college football pecking order UW falls.

Samaje Perine
Samaje Perine

16. Oklahoma
Oklahoma entered the 2014 season as a somewhat trendy pick, thanks in large part to dismantling Alabama in the Sugar Bowl the previous postseason. But injuries and inconsistent play proved too much to handle as the Sooners lost to every ranked opponent on its schedule last fall. That said, Samaje Perine emerged as a solid running threat and the Sooners look top open things up offensively with Lincoln Riley taking over as offensive coordinator. If Baker Mayfield can step right in and provide some stability at quarterback, Oklahoma could make some things happen in the Big 12.

17. Stanford
Defense has been the fuel to Stanford’s success in recent years, but this year just four starters are back. There could be some adjustments to make as a result, which means the offense may have to avoid a slow start that hurt the Cardinal last fall. An experienced offensive line should help Kevin Hogan get in a groove and getting Oregon at home could be pivotal in the Pac-12 North.

18. Arkansas
Even before the significant injury suffered by Jonathan Williams, I was suspect about all of the hype surrounding the Hogs entering 2015 and didn’t have them ranked in my personal Top 25.  Getting Alabama, Ole Miss, LSU and an improved Tennessee on the road doesn’t portend well for the wild expectations for 2015 success.  The Razorbacks did, though, lose four of their 2014 SEC games by a total of 22 points, with two of those coming on the road and one in overtime.

19. UCLA
Last year’s sexy pick has lost a bit of sizzle, but Jim Mora has the Bruins thinking big in 2015. In a wide open Pac-12 South, the Bruins must solve a quarterback question in an otherwise solid offense. The addition of Tom Bradley as defensive coordinator should work well with eight returning starters, including Myles Jack at inside linebacker and Eddie Vanderdoes at defensive tackle.

Les Miles
Les Miles

20. LSU
The Tigers are loaded with talent at the skill positions… loaded with talent along the offensive line… loaded with talent in all three defensive units.  So why the low Top-25 ranking?  As has been the case seemingly throughout Les Miles‘ entire tenure in Baton Rouge, it’s the quarterback, stupid.  If they can get even average play at the position, the Tigers will challenge for a spot at the playoff table.  If they don’t, the temperature on The Hat’s hot seat will continue to be ratcheted up.

21. Boise State
The lone Group of Five program represented in our Top 25, Bryan Harsin‘s Broncos are poised to make a run at an unbeaten season that would earn themselves a New Year’s Six bowl bid and a spot on the periphery of the playoff discussion.  The first two weeks of the season will show whether Boise is a contender or pretender: A home date against Washington and former BSU head coach Chris Petersen, followed by a road trip to BYU the following weekend.  Win both of those, and the table is set for a potentially magical system.

22. Ole Miss
Like many other of the top teams in the SEC in general and the West specifically, the Rebels are looking to replace their starting quarterback.  The fact that Ole Miss will bring a very talented defense to the table will help transition to a new player under center, although games at Alabama, Auburn and Mississippi State will (again) show just how far the Rebels still need to go to become an elite program.

23. Arizona
This division is stacked with talent. Arizona has one of the top defensive players in Scooby Wright and one of the more exciting quarterbacks in Anu Solomon. Running back Nick Washington is coming off a season with over 1,300 yards and 16 touchdowns too. Rich Rodriguez has a good group of Wildcats to work with, although the schedule does them few favors in conference play.

24. Nebraska
Transitioning from the volatile Bo Pelini to the laid-back Mike Riley could prove to be a culture shock for the players and athletic department and fans.  The offense under Riley could prove to be the same as the Cornhuskers are expected to be much more reliant in the passing game than under the previous regime, which will place an onus squarely on a quarterback, Tommie Armstrong, who completed just 53.3 percent of his passes last season in his first year as a starter.  September games against BYU and at Miami should show just where the ‘Huskers stand in the first year under Riley.

25. Oklahoma State
If you want a sleeper pick in the Big 12, Oklahoma State feels like a good option. Mike Gundy’s squad returns seven starters on each side of the football and sees Mason Rudolph take over as starting quarterback. Emmanuel Ogbah has become a force to reckon with on the defensive line and the Cowboys get Baylor and Oklahoma at home to close out the season. That could be huge.

Trump, coaches push for college football as cracks emerge

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President Donald Trump joined a U.S. senator and a number of coaches Monday in the push to save the college football season from a pandemic-forced shutdown.

There was speculation that two of the five most powerful conferences — the Big Ten and the Pac-12 — might call off their seasons. Farther east, Old Dominion canceled fall sports and became the first school in the Bowl Subdivison to break from its league in doing so; the rest of Conference USA was going forward with plans to play.

A Big Ten spokesman said no votes had been taken by its presidents and chancellors on fall sports as of Monday afternoon and the powerful Southeastern Conference made clear it was not yet ready to shutter its fall season.

“Best advice I’ve received since COVID-19: ‘Be patient. Take time when making decisions. This is all new & you’ll gain better information each day,’” SEC Commissioner Greg Sankey posted on Twitter. ”Can we play? I don’t know. We haven’t stopped trying.”

A growing number of athletes have spoken out about saving the season with Clemson star quarterback Trevor Lawrence among the group posting their thoughts on Twitter with the hashtag #WeWantToPla. Trump threw his support behind them Monday.

“The student-athletes have been working too hard for their season to be cancelled,” he tweeted.

Old Dominion has stopped trying. The Virginia school canceled football and other fall sports less than a week after Conference USA set out a plan to play a football season.

“We concluded that the season – including travel and competition – posed too great a risk for our student-athletes,” ODU President Broderick said.

Michigan coach Jim Harbaugh took a different stand, saying the Wolverines have shown players can be safe after they return to school.

“I’m not advocating for football this fall because of my passion or our players desire to play but because of the facts accumulated over the last eight weeks since our players returned to campus on June 13,” he wrote. “I am advocating on August 10 that this virus can be controlled and handled because of these facts.”

Sen. Ben Sasse, a Nebraska Republican, picked up on the safer-with-football theme in a letter to the presidents and chancellors of the Big Ten.

“Life is about tradeoffs. There are no guarantees that college football will be completely safe — that’s absolutely true; it’s always true,” he wrote. “But the structure and discipline of football programs is very likely safer than what the lived experience of 18- to 22-year-olds will be if there isn’t a season.”

“Here’s the reality: Many of you think that football is safer than no football, but you also know that you will be blamed if there is football, whereas you can duck any blame if you cancel football,” added Sasse, a former college president. “This is a moment for leadership. These young men need a season. Please don’t cancel college football.”

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Follow Ralph D. Russo at https://twitter.com/ralphDrussoAP and listen at http://www.westwoodonepodcasts.com/pods/ap-top-25-college-football-podcast/

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More AP college football: https://apnews.com/Collegefootball and https://twitter.com/AP_Top25

Players unite in push to save college season, create union

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Michigan defensive back Hunter Reynolds saw the tweets from Trevor Lawrence and other college football players pushing for the opportunity to play this season despite the pandemic.

Reynolds, one of the organizers behind a players’ rights movement in the Big Ten, didn’t like the way some on social media seemed to be pitting Lawrence’s message against the efforts of #BigTenUnited and #WeAreUnited.

“There was a lot of division,” Reynolds told AP early Monday morning.

Reynolds got on a call with Lawrence and the star quarterback’s Clemson teammate, Darien Rencher, and within a matter of hours the summer of athlete empowerment found another gear.

College football players from across the country united Sunday in an attempt to save their season and ensure they will no longer be left out of the sport’s biggest decisions.

Lawrence, Ohio State quarterback Justin Fields, Oklahoma State All-America running back Chuba Hubbard, Alabama running back Najee Harris and numerous other players from Florida State to Oregon posted a graphic on social media with #WeWantToPlay and #WeAreUnited.

“We came to the conclusion, We Want to Play, their message might have been conveyed differently but at the end of the day the message wasn’t too far off from what Big Ten United wanted to promote,” Reynolds said. “Which is we all want to play sports this fall. Every athlete, I’m pretty sure, wants to play their sports. They just want to do so safely.”

The #WeAreUnited hashtag was used a week ago by a group of Pac-12 players in announcing a movement they say has the support of hundreds of peers within their conference. They have threatened mass opt-outs by players if concerns about COVID-19 protocols, racial injustice in college sports and economic rights for athletes are not addressed.

#BigTenUnited arrived on the scene a couple days later, a movement that claimed the backing off 1,000 Big Ten football players. Their demands were more targeted, strictly related to health and safety in dealing with COVID-19.

Sunday night, the call with Reynolds, Rencher and Lawrence led to a Zoom meeting — of course — with some of the Pac-12 players involved in “WeAreUnited.”

Washington State defensive lineman Dallas Hobbs got to work on a graphic and now the movement is officially nationwide.

“Just started bouncing ideas off each others’ heads and kind of discussing where we go from here and we ended up coming up with that statement,” said Reynolds, a senior from South Orange, New Jersey.

Under the logos of each Power Five conference — ACC, Big Ten, Big 12, Pac-12 and SEC — the players pronounced their platform:

— We all want to play football this season.

— Establish universal mandated health & safety procedures and protocols to protect college athletes against COVID-19 among all conferences throughout the NCAA.

— Give players the opportunity to opt out and respect their decision.

— Guarantee eligibility whether a player chooses to play the season or not.

— Use our voices to establish open communication and trust between players and officials: Ultimately create a College Football Players Association.

All of this capped a weekend during which the adults who run college sports seemed to be moving toward shutting it all down because of the pandemic.

A day after the Mid-American Conference became the first of the major college football leagues to cancel the fall season, Power Five conference commissioners met Sunday. They discussed mounting concerns about whether a season can be safely conducted with the pandemic still not under control in the United States.

Big 12 Commissioner Bob Bowlsby said no decisions on the season have been made, but conceded the outlook has not improved.

“Are we in a better place today than two weeks, ago? No, we’re not,” he said.

Bowlsby cited “growing evidence and the growing pool of data around myocarditis.”

Myocarditis is inflammation of the heart and it has been found in some COVID-19 patients. There is concern it could be a long-term complication of contracting the virus even in young, healthy people, a group that has usually avoided severe cardiovascular symptoms.

Also Sunday night, the Big Ten’s university presidents and chancellors held a previously unscheduled meeting, a person with knowledge of the meeting told The Associated Press. The person spoke on condition of anonymity because the meeting was not announced by the conference.

Another person with direct knowledge of the meeting, speaking on condition of anonymity, said no votes were taken or decisions made about the college football season.

The final call on whether major college football will played this season rests in the hands of the university presidents who oversee the largest conferences.

With doom and gloom hanging over college football, Lawrence, who has become the face of the sport in a summer of strife, tried to push back the tide with a series of tweets.

“People are at just as much, if not more risk, if we don’t play,” Lawrence posted. “Players will all be sent home to their own communities where social distancing is highly unlikely and medical care and expenses will be placed on the families if they were to contract covid19.”

Penn State tight end Pat Freiermuth had a similar message, and the parents of Ohio State football players weighed in, too.

Reynolds wants athletes to have a say in the meetings that are deciding the fate of their sports — starting now.

”All college athletes through unifying and not being afraid to speak our minds and having social media to kind of mobilize, I think that box on a Zoom call is something that is pretty attainable,” he said. “Especially, in the near future.”

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Follow Ralph D. Russo at https://twitter.com/ralphDrussoAP and listen at http://www.westwoodonepodcasts.com/pods/ap-top-25-college-football-podcast/

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More AP college football: https://apnews.com/Collegefootball and https://twitter.com/AP_Top25

After MAC surrenders to pandemic, will other leagues follow?

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In many ways, the Mid-American Conference has little in common with Power Five leagues that first come to mind when fans think of major college football.

There are no 75,000-seat stadiums in the MAC. Million-dollar per year coaches are rare. In a typical season, NFL scouts might find one or two potential first-round draft picks playing at the 12 MAC schools that dot the Midwest. The MAC’s biggest games — #MACtion, if you will — are often played on Tuesday and Wednesday nights. Its television deal with ESPN pays per year only a few million more than the $9 million Clemson pays coach Dabo Swinney.

Still, the MAC is one of 10 conferences that competes in the NCAA’s highest level of football, and Saturday it became the first of those to surrender to the coronavirus pandemic and cancel the fall sports season.

So is the MAC an anomaly, done in by its small budgets or is this a dire sign of things to come in college football?

“I won’t try to judge what other folks are doing,” MAC Commissioner Jon Steinbrecher said. “I know we’re all in the same place. They all have their advisers. They’re going to make judgments based on the information they are receiving.”

Not long after the MAC announced it would explore second-semester seasons for all fall sports, including soccer and volleyball, the Big Ten made its own announcement that seemed ominous given the timing.

Tapping the brakes on football’s preseason, the Big Ten told its schools that until further notice full contact practices cannot begin. All teams will remain in the first two days of what is known as the “acclimatization period,” working out in just helmets. The first Big Ten games of the season are scheduled for Sept. 5.

“As we have consistently stated, we will continue to evaluate daily, while relying on our medical experts, to make the best decisions possible for the health, safety and wellness of our student-athletes,” the Big Ten said in a statement.

The MAC’s schools were facing a significant financial burden by trying to maintain costly COVID-19 protocols, while also dealing with the uncertainty that campuses can be opened safely.

A move to the spring, however, could also be budget-buster if it means less revenue from the ESPN deal, which pays each school about $1 million per year, and football ticket sales. The MAC also shares about $90 million per year in College Football Playoff money with four other conferences.

“It would be naive to say that you don’t give thought and consideration to what the financial ramifications of any decision are, but this was a health and well-being decision first and foremost,” Steinbrecher said. “As we sit here today we don’t know what this will mean financially and how the rest of the fall plays out.”

Steinbrecher said the decision effects only fall sports, not basketball or others that begin in the second semester such as baseball, softball and lacrosse.

He added the decision was unanimous among the membership. Northern Illinois athletic director Sean Frazier, supported by NIU President Lisa Freeman, has been a vocal advocate of delaying the season.

“No one wants to have football or sports more than me,” said Frazier, who played football at Alabama in the late 1980s. “Football gave me all the opportunities I have today, but I can’t do it at the expense of people’s lives.”

Eastern Michigan athletic director Scott Wetherbee said he has been feeling a sense of inevitability for two weeks about the MAC canceling fall football, but can’t predict whether this decision trickles up to other conferences.

“Could it? Certainly. There’s certainly a narrative out there that could happen,” Wetherbee said. “No, it wouldn’t shock me if some followed suit. In fact, it would shock me if some didn’t.”

NCAA chief medical officer Brian Hainline made clear that even though plans for the football season have been adjusted to accommodate potential COVID-19 disruptions like the ones Major League Baseball has had, they are all still aspirational.

“Almost everything would have to be perfectly aligned to continue moving forward,” Hainline said Friday during the NCAA’s weekly video chat on social media.

As the Power Five conferences re-worked their schedules to play exclusively or mostly within their conferences, another of the MAC’s revenue streams dried up.

MAC schools, with athletic budgets in the $30 million range, rely heavily on payouts from road games against power conference teams. Kent State alone had more than $5 million in so-called guarantee games canceled. Whether they can be recouped and when is still to be determined. Without that revenue, the strain became too great of trying to keep players and staff safe during a pandemic.

“Certainly there was a cost attached to it,” Wetherbee said. “But as a league we were prepared to do it.”

The move to try spring football has already been going on in the second tier of Division I.

Nine of 13 conferences that play in the Championship Subdivision, have postponed fall football seasons. The first was the Ivy League in early July.

Now it’s the MAC, which was among the first conferences to limit fan access to its basketball tournament in March as concerns for the virus began to soar across the country. On March 12, the MAC was among many conferences to call off their tournaments hours before the NCAA canceled all of March Madness.

“If you told me in March we’d be here today,” Steinbrecher said, “I’d never have believed it”

Colorado State pauses football after allegations of racism

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FORT COLLINS, Colo. — Colorado State is pausing all football activities after an investigation started by the president of the university into the program’s handling of COVID-19 cases uncovered allegations of racism and verbal abuse toward athletes.

Athletic director Joe Parker said he asked President Joyce McConnell to expand the investigation she announced Tuesday to include a comprehensive review of the athletic department and football program.

“Today, we learned of some extremely troubling allegations of racism and verbal abuse from CSU’s athletic administration generally and in the football program specifically,” Parke said.

Parker’s statement did not mention any particular member of the coaching staff or athletic department. Steve Addazio is in his first season as head coach of the Rams.

McConnell announced the investigation Tuesday after an article published in the Coloradoan that quoted unidentified football players and members of the athletic staff saying coaches told them not to report coronavirus symptoms and threatened players with reduced playing time should they quarantine.

“Colorado State University is committed to being an anti-racist university, and we will not tolerate any behavior or climate that goes against that core value,” Parker said. “Moreover, CSU Athletics is committed to the health and well-being of student-athletes above all other priorities, and this includes their mental health. We believe it is our responsibility to make sure that all student-athletes feel welcomed and valued as members of an inclusive athletics community.”

Colorado State has paused all meetings, workouts and practices.

“While we have been working hard towards playing football this fall, the holistic well-being of our student-athletes is our unequivocal top priority,” Parker said. “We must and will address these allegations before we focus on playing football.”

On Tuesday, Addazio said he welcomed the investigation into the football program’s alleged mishandling of coronavirus protocols.

McConnell announced via an email to student-athletes and department staff Thursday that Husch Blackwell, a legal firm based in Kansas City, would lead the probe into those allegations

Addazio was hired in December, replacing Mike Bobo, after spending seven seasons with Boston College.

The Rams were scheduled to open the season Sept. 19 by hosting Northern Colorado, but the Big Sky Conference voted this week to push back its football season to the spring.