Week 1, Statistically Speaking

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A statistical snapshot of the week that was in college football…

.845Urban Meyer‘s winning percentage, the best among active coaches with at least 10 years of head coaching experience.  Bob Stoops and Nick Saban are next at .792 and .749, respectively.

1 — Games in Week 1 that pitted ranked opponents (No. 20 Wisconsin vs. No. 3 Alabama).

3 — Sacks for Michigan State’s Riley Bullough in his first career start at middle linebacker in Michigan State’s win over Western Michigan.

4 — Touchdown passes for Everett Golson in his Florida State debut, a 59-16 win over Texas State.  Golson also threw for 302 yards.

4 — 10-win seasons for Michigan State under Mark Dantonio.  Prior to Dantonio’s arrival, the program had two 10-win seasons in its history.

6 — Different teams that have won the Big 12 the last six seasons (Baylor, Kansas State, Oklahoma, Oklahoma State, Texas and TCU). No other Power Five conference has had as many different champions in that six-year span.

8 — Road games for Louisiana-Monroe this season, the only FBS team that can make that claim.  Those eight games will lead to ULM traveling 17,224 round-trip miles.

10.48 — Yards per play averaged by Baylor in its 56-21 win over SMU, setting a school record in the process.  The Bears rolled up 723 yards of total offense.

11 — Knee surgeries for Bobby Swigert since 2012.   In his first game in three years, the Boston College wide receiver caught two passes for 16 yards, including an 11-yard touchdown.

11.5 — Yards per carry averaged by North Carolina’s Elijah Hood in rushing for a career-high 138 yards in South Carolina’s 17-13 win.

11.6 — Wins per season for Florida State’s Jimbo Fisher, the most of any active head coach with at least five years experience.  The only others currently averaging in double digits are Washington’s Chris Petersen (11.1), Ohio State’s Urban Meyer (10.9) and Oklahoma’s Bob Stoops (10.5).

13 — Consecutive weeks Colorado and Hawaii will play without the benefit of a bye this season, the only FBS teams that can make that claim.  Arizona, FIU, UMass and North Texas will all play 12 straight weeks to open the year.

14 — Consecutive road wins for Ohio State, the longest amongst FBS teams.  OSU’s last road defeat came on Nov. 26, 2011 at Michigan.  The Buckeyes will begin their defense of their national title on the road in Blacksburg Labor Day night.

16.78 — Miles Georgia Tech has run for since Paul Johnson took over the Yellow Jackets in 2008.  That equates to 29,536 yards, the most of any FBS team in that span.

20 — Returning starters for Ohio, the most of any FBS program.  Tennessee, UCLA and Vanderbilt, with 18 apiece, pace all Power Five teams.

23 — Yards per carry true freshman Marcus Marshall averaged in rushing for 184 yards in Georgia Tech’s Thursday win over Alcorn State.

26 — Career wins for Ohio State’s Braxton Miller, the most of any active FBS quarterback.  Miller likely won’t add to that total this season, though, as he moved to H-back in the offseason.

41 — Consecutive games in which Arizona State’s D.J. Foster has caught at least one pass, the longest such streak in the country.  Foster is also coming off a season in which he was the only FBS player to rush for at least 1,000 yards and catch at least 600 yards worth of passes.

76 — Points scored by Ole Miss, the most the Rebels have scored in a single game since a 1935 win over West Tennessee Teachers College.

88 — Times Wake Forest’s Alex Kinal has punted without a touchback.  Kinal’s last punt that sailed into the end zone came in November of 2013.

95 — Consecutive games Stanford had scored at least 10 points, the longest such streak in the country, prior to its 16-6 upset loss to Northwestern.

152 — Yards rushing for Oregon State quarterback Seth Collins in a 26-7 win over Weber State, averaging 8.9 yards per carry.

134 — Seasons Navy spent as a football independent before playing its first game Saturday afternoon as a member of the AAC.

184 — Players on Navy’s roster, easily outdistancing No. 2 Army’s 145.  Nebraska carries the biggest Power Five roster at 136.

223 — Rushing yards for Ray Lawry in Old Dominion’s win over Eastern Michigan.

233 — Return yards for Maryland’s Will Likely, setting the Big Ten record in that category.  The previous mark was 201 by Iowa’s Nile Kinnick way back in 1939.

322 — Passing yards for Texas Tech’s Patrick Mahomes against Stephen F. Austin… in the first half alone.  The Red Raiders quarterback finished the game with 425 yards and 473 yards of total offense as he added 48 on the ground.

323 — Passing yards for Wake Forest’s John Wolford in the win over Elon Thursday.  It was the first 300-yard game of his career, and bested his previous high of 291 yards set last September.

399 — Passing yards for Al Cobb in VMI’s loss to Ball State.  His previous career-high was 396, set in the 2014 regular-season finale.

424 — Career-high passing yards for Matt Johnson in Bowling Green’s loss to Tennessee.

659 — Yards of total offense Southern Illinois put up against Indiana in a 48-47 loss.  It was the program’s most yards against an FBS team since 1970.

1,302 — Games Rutgers has played in its history, the most of any FBS program.  Penn, with 1,353, holds the all-time NCAA record.

1944 — The last season a true freshman started an opener at left tackle for Clemson prior to Mitch Hyatt lining up Saturday and protecting his quarterback’s blind side.  The last to do it was Phil Prince, who went on to become the university’s president.

1967 — Up until this season, the last year Michigan played host to both Michigan State and Ohio State.

2010 — Last year Arkansas State started a season with same head coach as the year prior until 2015. Blake Anderson is in his second season at ASU; his predecessors, Hugh Freeze (Ole Miss, 2011), Gus Malzahn (Auburn, 2012) and Bryan Harsin (Boise State, 2013) spent one season each with the Red Wolves.

3,473 — Undergraduate students enrolled at Tulsa, the smallest of any FBS program.

40,122 — Total miles Hawaii will travel for its six 2015 road games. UH will be the only FBS program to play games in five separate time zones, traveling to Ohio State (Eastern), Wisconsin (Central), Boise State (Mountain), New Mexico (Mountain), Nevada (Pacific) and UNLV (Pacific).

Missouri AD hopes to hear on NCAA appeal before football season

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While there are always a ton of storylines surrounding the SEC on any given season, the big focus for Missouri is quite clear heading into the 2019 campaign and it has nothing to do with anything that is on the field. The Tigers were handed a surprising bowl ban by the NCAA back in January for a host of major violations and fans, players and other supporters of the school have been vocal in their displeasure ever since.

We might get some clarity on the exact status of Mizzou’s football program later this summer however, as athletic director Jim Sterk detailed to KTGR in a recent interview.

“We really think we have a strong case for overturning the majority of the decisions that they made,” Sterk told ‘The Big Show.‘ “The people that are a lot smarter than me that worked on this case really presented an appeal that’s strong and compelling. And we’ll be doing an in-person hearing, we’re expecting somewhere on the middle of July and then hear something hopefully by before football starts or shortly thereafter.”

Sterk went on to say that he had heard from a number of folks in other departments who criticized the NCAA’s original decision, which also came with restrictions to official visits and recruiting contacts in addition to the bowl ban. The timeline he indicated is notable however, as the school formally appealed in late March. While the appeals committee could rule sooner, a six-week or so time-frame seems about the norm on these kinds of things and would indeed put a response dropping just as the Tigers get ready to play Wyoming in their season opener on August 31.

We’ll see if Missouri’s case is any different — as Sterk tries to make out — but appeals are still typically an uphill battle for schools to win. A bowl ban isn’t the end of the world for the Tigers but they no doubt would like to play in one if they qualify given expectations around Columbia are a bit higher in 2019 after the addition of Clemson QB Kelly Bryant and a host of others.

Either way, it at least seems like a good bet for Mizzou to find out their fate early in the season so they know what they have to play for… or not.

Travian Robertson replaces Brad Lawing as Georgia State’s DL coach

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In February of this year, Georgia State announced that former Florida State assistant Brad Lawing had been hired as Shawn Elliott‘s next defensive line coach.  Nearly four months later, Lawing is out and a new position coach is in.

According to the Sun Belt Conference school, Travian Robertson has been hired as the Panthers’ next line coach on the defensive side of the ball.  The move marks a homecoming of sorts as Robertson served as a graduate assistant for Elliott during the 2017 campaign at GSU.

Robertson played his college football at South Carolina, with a portion of that career intersecting with Elliott’s time as an assistant on Steve Spurrier‘s Gamecocks coaching staff.

“It was a natural fit for Travian to come back to Georgia State after spending a year with us previously,” the head coach said in a statement. “Our relationship goes back to our days at South Carolina, and I have tremendous respect for him as a person and as a coach, and we’re thrilled to have him here.”

This past season, Robertson, who had a four-year career in the NFL after being selected in the seventh round of the 2012 draft, served as the line coach at Albany State.

Illinois offers update on DE who suffered severe spinal injury

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There’s yet another update regarding an Illinois player who suffered a significant injury earlier this month.

Illini true junior defensive end Bobby Roundtree sustained what was described as a severe spinal cord injury in a swimming accident May 18 and underwent surgery a day later. It was subsequently reported that Roundtree was progressing well following the surgery and, while he remained hospitalized, was speaking, eating and sitting up.

While Roundtree had remained hospitalized on into this month at a Tampa-area hospital, Illini athletic director Josh Whitman confirmed Tuesday that Roundtree has since been moved to a rehabilitation center in Chicago, which the AD described as “one of the finest facilities of its kind in the country.”

“He’s receiving top-level care,” Whitman added.

As for what is to come, Roundtree is expected to remain in the unnamed facility for a period of 3-6 months, at which point he would then transition back to Champaign to continue his rehab.

Roundtree has started 20 games the past two seasons since coming to Illinois as a three-star member of their 2017 recruiting class. This past season, the 6-5, 245-pound end led the Illini in tackles for loss with 12.5 and pass breakups, and was second in sacks with 7.5 and quarterback hits with four.

For that performance, the media named Roundtree honorable mention All-Big Ten for the 2018 season.

Lincoln Riley would owe Oklahoma $4.6 million if he leaves for another job after 2019 season — including NFL

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Thanks in large part to back-to-back Heisman Trophy-winning quarterbacks, Lincoln Riley was a hot topic of speculation during the most recent spinning of the NFL coaching carousel, even as the head coach has stated in the past it’s “hard to see myself leaving Oklahoma” for the big-boy league of professional football.  In approving a contract extension for Riley earlier this year, the coach’s employer gave itself a (very small) bit of a financial buffer should Riley ever change his mind.

Based on an open records request, Tulsa World reported Tuesday that, should Riley leave OU for any other job, including the NFL, after the 2019 season, he would owe the university $4.6 million.  That number drops by $1 million every year thereafter until March 16, 2022, at which point a buyout would be waived.

Riley’s new deal runs through the 2023 season; if he’s the head coach on April 1, 2021, he would be due a $1 million bonus.  Additionally, the World writes, “Riley receives $700,000 as an annual stay benefit if he remains employed as OU’s head coach on June 1 of each contract year.” The newspaper further writes that, “[i]n addition to the annual stay benefit after two seasons, Riley gets an annual amount of $1 million deposited into a supplemental retirement income plan.”

“Riley is immediately fully vested in the plan,” the paper added.

The $6 million in total compensation Riley will receive for 2019 is the most OU has paid any head football coach in its history, topping the $5.55 million Bob Stoops made in what turned out to be his final season in Norman.

The 35-year-old Riley just completed his second season at OU.  In those two seasons, the Sooners have gone 24-4 and won a pair of Big 12 championships.  The Sooners have also appeared in the playoffs both of those seasons and OU quarterbacks have claimed back-to-back Heisman Trophy wins — Kyler Murray this season (HERE), Baker Mayfield last (HERE).