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Kyle Allen rips Texas A&M’s post-Johnny Manziel culture

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There was a time when being a part of the Texas A&M family was what Kyle Allen wanted out of his college experience, but his quick departure from the program raised more than a few eyebrows. The culture around the Aggies program following Johnny Manziel turned out to be something Allen was not comfortable being a part of, which is why he opted out and transferred to Houston.

“I think the culture was a big part of it, and I think that stems from Johnny’s era there — the way that they let Johnny and [others] act there,” Allen said in an interview with Dennis Dodd of CBSSports.com. “They [could] do that and still win games because they had Johnny … and five offensive linemen playing in the NFL right now.”

“A lot of people were riding off that, ‘I can do whatever the hell I want and win on Saturday.'”

Allen’s statements and explanations about his time in College Station shed some light on the state of the program under Kevin Sumlin, who himself has come under some heat in the last few months after losing both Allen and Kyler Murray to transfers after the regular season (Allen transferred to HoustonMurray ended up at Oklahoma). Given how much Texas A&M is paying Sumlin, the bar has been raised and the Aggies have struggled to live up to the hype it has generated the past couple of years without Manziel. As Allen describes it, Texas A&M’s players were going in too many different directions to allow Texas A&M make any run for an SEC division championship.

“When you don’t have players like Johnny and [others] there anymore, you have to really come together as a team and scrap for wins,” Allen said. “We had a lot of people who were talking about the same goal but weren’t all committed and on the same page to get to that goal. For you to win in the SEC — especially the SEC West — 10 games a year and be a controlling powerhouse in that conference, you can’t have a bunch of people going different ways.”

Allen wasn’t done. He also seemed to take a shot at Sumlin and the Texas A&M coaching staff.

“Everyone wasn’t in a straight line. Everyone was going this way, this way, this way. We had a ton of talent there. I think that, once you get all the right coaches there and get the vision right, you can do a lot of things.”

There are always two sides to every story, of course.

Washington dismisses DL Mosiah Nasili-Kite for violation of team rules

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A violation of team rules has led to Washington sophomore defensive lineman Mosiah Nasil-Kite being shown the exit door from the Huskies program. Washington announced the dismissal with nothing more than a brief statement and confirmation nobody from the program, including head coach Chris Petersen, will address the issue any further.

The specific violation of team rules was not detailed or reported.

Nasil-Kite was a three-star recruit in Washington’s Class of 2018. He did not play in any games for the Huskies last season while taking a redshirt season in his first year on campus.

UCF voted AAC preseason favorite for second straight year

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Defending American Athletic Conference champion UCF is entering the 2019 season being viewed as the team to beat in the conference, again. The preseason media poll released by the AAC on Tuesday during the AAC media day event in Newport, Rhode Island saw the Knights once again be chosen as the preseason favorite to win the conference. UCF and Memphis were each selected as the preseason division favorites in the East Division and West Division, respectively.

UCF received 19 first-place votes in the preseason media poll, earning the Knights a conference-high 169 total points in the tabulation. Cincinnati, coming off an 11-win season, received 11 first-place votes in the East Division. The gap was a bit closer in the West Division at the top. Memphis was picked as the division favorite for a third straight preseason with 15 first-place votes in the division, but Dana Holgorsen and his Houston Cougars received 14 first-place votes. The Tigers and Cougars are separated by just three points in the preseason poll. SMU also received a first-place vote in the West Division, although the Mustangs finished fourth overall in the preseason media poll.

UCF was the leader in conference championship picks with 12 votes going to the Knights. Cincinnati had the second-most votes for the AAC title, suggesting the balance of power resides in the East Division this season. The Bearcats received eight votes for the AAC title, with Memphis receiving six and Houston picking up the remaining four votes in the mix. It is worth noting that just two preseason AAC polls in the six-years of the conference’s existence have correctly predicted the eventual conference champion. Cincinnati was part of a three-team tie for first place in the conference after being labeled the preseason favorite in 2014 (UCF and Memphis tied for the title in the last season before the introduction of the AAC championship game). UCF successfully lived up to the preseason poll’s expectations last season.

EAST DIVISION

  1. UCF (19 first-place votes) – 169 points
  2. Cincinnati (11) – 157
  3. USF – 107
  4. Temple 101
  5. East Carolina – 66
  6. UConn – 30

WEST DIVISION

  1. Memphis (15 first-place votes) – 165
  2. Houston (14) – 162
  3. Tulane – 108
  4. SMU (1) – 87
  5. Navy – 70
  6. Tulsa – 38

AAC CHAMPIONSHIP

  • UCF – 12 points
  • Cincinnati – 8
  • Memphis – 6
  • Houston – 4

Conference USA also released its preseason poll today, with Marshall and North Texas being named preseason favorites.

Clemson TE Garrett Williams to pass on final year of eligibility

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Clemson tight end Garrett Williams will not suit up for the defending national champions this fall. Instead, Williams will look to assist the program in other ways and begin his quest to become an officer in the United States Marine Corps.

Williams expressed his desire to pursue a military career back in February when he suggested he was probably not coming back to play for the Tigers. That decision now is official, according to a report from Tiger Net. Although he is not going to play for Clemson as the program searches for back-to-back national titles, he is expected to assist head coach Dabo Swinney as an assistant coach of some kind.

Williams is still rehabbing a torn ACL that he suffered in the spring of 2017. The injury likely forced Williams to begin thinking about some alternative plans to football, which led him to the military path. Although Williams returned to the football field for the 2018 season, in which he appeared in 13 games, the redshirt senior has made it known for quite some time the Tigers will likely have to prepare for the 2019 season without him on the depth chart.

Big 12 cooridinator of officials clears up when ‘horns down’ is and is not a penalty

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Opponents of the Texas Longhorns have been flashing more and more “Horns Down” hand signals in recent seasons, and the Big 12 attempted to put an end to it. They did not, and now the conference’s coordinator of officials is letting it be known the gesture is OK, as long as it doesn’t go too far.

Big 12 Coordinator of Football Officials Greg Burks explained the context for what would draw a flag on a “Horns Down” gesture to Adam Rittenberg of ESPN at Big 12 Media Days in Arlington, Texas. In short, as long as a player doesn’t flash it at an opposing player, it will probably not get flagged. Per Rittenberg’s report;

“Like any play, there is a degree — who it’s directed at,” Burks said Tuesday at Big 12 media days at AT&T Stadium. “If they do it in their bench area, we’re not going to look at it. It would be like any other celebration foul, so it has to be like any other foul we have. Does it rise to the level we need to deal with that? It’s a hot topic.

“I know people want us to be definitive on that, but it’s like any touchdown celebration. Is it directed at an opponent or just celebration with your teammates?”

One example used to emphasize the interpretation of the Big 12’s unsportsmanlike conduct penalty was last year’s game between West Virginia and Texas. In that game, WVU quarterback Will Grier flashed a “horns down” while celebrating a two-point conversion, and he was penalized for the celebration after flashing the symbol to the Texas fans. Because the gesture was aimed at the Texas fans, the penalty would still be called today.

Basically, the Big 12 officials will have to interpret how the gesture is being used. Is it being used in celebration purely between teammates or into a television camera? If so, then the flag should stay in the pocket. If the gesture is aimed at an opposing player or fans, then the flag will be thrown if it is witnessed by an official.

It’s one thing to say players should not flash a “horns down” anyway and show good sportsmanship, but on the other hand, if the players want to have fun and lash out at the opposing fans, a “horns down” is a far cry from the most offensive thing a player could do.