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Urban Meyer wants 100,000 fans at Ohio State spring game

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Coming off a national championship last year, Ohio State set a new record for spring game attendance when 99,391 Buckeye faithful made their way through the gates of Ohio Stadium for the annual spring game. This year, Urban Meyer wants to push that record into six digits.

“There’s nothing like performing in front of 100,000 people,” Meyer said in a press conference with the media on Monday. “It’s supposed to be great weather so I’m hoping we get 100,000 people.”

Meyer made it clear he is asking the fans to come out in record numbers this weekend.

“That’s an appeal to our fans to come on out … this year even more than last year,” Meyer said. He has coaching reasons though. He wants to see how his younger players handle the atmosphere.

“I want to see [freshman quarterback] Joe Burrow perform in front of 100,000 people in that stadium. I want to see [freshman running back] Mike Weber perform in front of 100,000 people. They’ve never done it.”

They will, of course, play in front of 100,000 fans during their stays at Ohio State, both at home and on the road, but there is nothing wrong with seeing how they handle the transition right out of the gate with a spring game. But 100,000? That might be tough.

The Buckeyes set the record with 99,391 fans last year, and that was 23,000 more than the next highest spring game attendance (Penn State, 76,881). Ohio State does own the two highest spring game attendance figures though, with 95,722 attending the 2009 spring game. With no new hardware to show off and a quarterback situation already locked down, will Buckeye fans come out in record numbers as Meyer hopes?

Ohio State’s spring game is scheduled for Saturday, April 13 at 1:30 p.m. The game will air on Big Ten Network.

Minnesota’s Tom Foley punts way into transfer portal

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A Minnesota football player is the latest to prove that punters are people too and, as such, aren’t immune from the pull of the portal.

On his personal Twitter account this week, Tom Foley announced that, “[a]after talking it over with my family and friends I have decided to put my name into the transfer portal.” The Punter gave no specific reason for the decision.

“I would like to say thank you to [Minnesota football head coach P.J.] Fleck and [special teams coordinator Rob] Wenger for giving me the opportunity to become a Golden Gopher,” Foley wrote. “Thank You to all my teammates who pushed me to become my best.”

Now, for what’s seemingly becoming a daily disclaimer when it comes to transfers.

As we’ve stated myriad times in the past, a player can remove his name from the portal and remain at the same school. At this point, though, other programs are permitted to contact a player without receiving permission from his current football program.

NCAA bylaws also permit schools to pull a portal entrant’s scholarship at the end of the semester in which he entered it.

A walk-on from Peoria, Ill., Foley took a redshirt as a true freshman last season. He has yet to see any game action for the Minnesota football program.

Minnesota currently has two punters on its football roster. Fifth-year senior Matthew Stephenson took a grad transfer to the Big Ten school from Middle Tennessee State. At MTSU, he punted 16 times and averaged 37.06 per. Additionally, true freshman Mark Crawford is a 2020 three-star signee who comes to the school from Australia. He was rated as the No. 5 punter in this year’s class.

Minnesota is coming off a season in which it won 11 games, the football program’s most since 1904.

In interview with Howard Stern, Tom Brady talks about almost transferring from Michigan to Cal

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While a lot of the attention surrounding his Howard Stern interview focused on his relationship with the current POTUS, there was a college football angle to all of the Tom Brady talk.

Coming out of high school in California, Brady chose a scholarship offer from Michigan over one from Cal. His first season at U-M, Brady sat behind Scott Dreisbach, Brian Griese and Jason Carr, the son of head coach Lloyd Carr and took a redshirt. His second season, with Carr out of eligibility, Brady was still behind Dreisbach and Griese.

In his book “Belichick and Brady,” Michael Holley explained that Brady very nearly transferred from Michigan to Cal because of his positioning on the depth chart. During the course of his SiriusXM interview with the King of All Media Wednesday, Brady acknowledged the transfer talk.

The guy who was playing above me, Scott Dreisbach, he was very much their guy,” Brady told Stern during the show. “I thought we had got off to kind of a good start, he had got off to a good start in his career, and I was looking up at all these guys on the depth chart that were ahead of me, and I thought, ‘I’m never going to get a chance here.’ I remember talking to the people at Cal, because that was my second choice, to go to Berkeley, and I was thinking, ‘Maybe I should go there, because I’ll get more of an opportunity to play.’

“I went in and talked to Lloyd Carr. I said, ‘I don’t really think I’m going to get my chance here. I think I should leave,’ and he said, ‘Tom, I want you to stay, and I believe in you, and I think you could be a good player, but you’ve got to start worrying about the things you can control.’ When he said that he wanted me there, I went to bed that night, I woke up the next day, and I figured, you know what, if I’m going to be — and I still feel this way today — in a team sport, you’ve got to sacrifice what you want individually for what’s best for the team. So if you’re not the best guy, it’s a disservice for the team if you’re forced to somehow play. My feeling was, if I’m going to be the best, I’ve got to beat out the best, and if the best competition’s at Michigan, I’ve got to beat those guys out if I’m going to play. I ended up committing to be the best.

Obviously, Brady opted to remain with the Wolverines. He served as Griese’s backup in 1997, then beat out Dreisbach for the starting job the following season. After two years as U-M’s started, Brady was infamously selected 199th overall in the 2000 NFL Draft.

Suffice to say, Brady did fairly well for himself during his 20 seasons in New England.

Minnesota projecting potential $75 million loss due to COVID-19

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The worst case for Minnesota when it comes to COVID-19 is a hefty bottom line hit.

The school’s board of regents met on Tuesday and detailed some of the initial modeling they are projecting as a result of the coronavirus pandemic. Speaking just of the athletic department, that could result in nearly $75 million in lost revenue alone for the Gophers.

The Athletic’s Eric Vegoe detailed one of the slides from the meeting, which shows an overall $200 million hit to the university at large in a worst case — or “severe” — scenario:

Obviously the severe scenario that shows COVID-19 lasting into the fall is projecting a serious loss of revenue as the result of no (or reduced) college football. The sport makes up the vast majority of Minnesota’s revenues and has untold impact on other items such as donations as well.

USA Today’s database of athletic department revenues show the Gophers had nearly $125 million in revenue through the 2017-18 school year. While that figure has undoubtedly climbed higher as Big Ten media rights distributions have escalated, the number provided to the regents is still a huge chunk of that amount.

Even the moderate estimate of things lasting through the summer could result in a 20% shave on the department’s income.

It goes without saying that finances across the board in every industry will be impacted by the global pandemic but slides like the one above are a good reminder that even in the tiny world of football or college athletics, the cuts will probably have to run quite deep. And if a school like Minnesota is potentially forced to cut back, just imagine what other Group of Five programs will have to go through.

At some point college football will return to our lives but the ramifications of this current battle against the coronavirus figure will certainly have a far-reaching impact well beyond the gridiron. Sadly, no amount of ‘Rowing the Boat’ will be able to change that fact.

Bay Area official does not expect sports to return “until at least Thanksgiving”

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So much of the intersection of the coronavirus and college football has centered on when the game might return this fall.

Oklahoma State’s Mike Gundy wants players back as soon as May. Clemson’s Dabo Swinney is confident that Death Valley will be packed come September. Virginia Tech’s athletic director has floated moving the calendar back just to get a full slate in.

In short, nobody knows.

That unknown has weighed heavily on most as they are asked to discuss the topic in recent days. What is left unsaid however, is that no coach or administrator will truly be in charge of determining the date CFB returns. That will be left to health officials at the local level.

One such official broached that topic this week. Speaking to the Santa Clara County (in the California Bay Area) Board of Supervisors, Dr. Jeffrey Smith believes sports in general may be looking more toward winter than fall whenever it returns.

Per the Los Angeles Times:

Smith on Tuesday told that county’s Board of Supervisors that he did not expect there would be “any sports games until at least Thanksgiving, and we’d be lucky to have them by Thanksgiving. This is not something that’s going to be easy to do.”

Santa Clara County is home to both Stanford and San Jose State. It’s also located in the region of the United States that was at the forefront of shutting down as a response to COVID-19 last month.

If those in charge don’t see a return to the football field until turkey time, those optimistic projections of getting the season done on time can probably be thrown to the wind.

Let’s hope that won’t turn out to be the case and the world can get a medical miracle it desperately needs. But until that happens, it’s probably best to be more pessimistic when it comes to the 2020 season than optimistic.