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Former Penn State officials Tim Curley and Gary Schultz plead guilty to child endangerment charges

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Two Penn State officials tied to the Jerry Sandusky scandal have pleaded guilty to charges of child endangerment on Monday. Former Penn State athletic director Tim Curley and senior vice president Gary Schultz entered their pleas to a judge with an agreement to potentially testify against former Penn State president Graham Spanier next week, according to a report from Penn Live.

Curley and Schultz face up to five years in prison and a maximum fine of $10,000 for their misdemeanor charge. The charges are tied to each man’s connection to the failure to report an incident witnessed by former Penn State assistant coach Mike McQueary (Sandusky sexually abusing a boy in the showers of the Penn State football building) and reported to former head football coach Joe Paterno. Paterno reported the information to Curley, his supervisor, and Curley and Schultz never reported the incident to the authorities.

Sentencing for Curley and Schultz is expected to take place within the next 90 days.

Sandusky, the former Penn state defensive coordinator, was found guilty on 45 of 48 charges related to sexually abuse of minors from 1994 through 2009. He is currently serving a sentence of up to 60 years, effectively a life sentence for the 73-year old. A request by Sandusky for a new trial has been denied. One of Sandusky’s sons, Jeffrey Sandusky, was recently arrested and charged with sexual assault of a minor.

The NCAA used The Freeh Report into the handling of the Sandusky scandal as the basis of a hefty set of sanctions slapping Penn State’s football program with a four-year postseason ban, vacated over 100 wins from the record books and a significant reduction in scholarships, and fined the university $60 million. The NCAA has since rescinded its sanction terms, first gradually and then entirely following positive reviews from an independent review from George Mitchell and mounting legal battles.

McQueary was awarded a $7.3 million payment from Penn State in a defamation lawsuit.

Paterno passed away in January 2012. His vacated wins from the NCAA sanctions have since been restored.

Baylor fires back at former AD Ian McCaw after lobbing allegations in deposition

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The war of words between Baylor and those who were fired and/or run out of town during the school’s sexual assault scandal is not ending any time soon.

Case in point came Friday as the university responded with a pointed statement directed at former athletic director Ian McCaw (now in the same job at Liberty) after he lobbed several accusations at the board and others in Waco of their handling of the matter. In a deposition for a lawsuit filed by several women against the school, McCaw claimed school officials had essentially “scapegoated” black football players and tried to pin the entire, decades-long scandal at the school on the football program.

Via Waco Tribune reporter Phillip Ericksen, Baylor has fired back after the deposition was made public and responded to most of the allegations by firmly denying them.

The back-and-forth between McCaw and Baylor also comes on the heels of former defensive coordinator Phil Bennett calling the entire university response “a fraud” and specifically noted errors committed by law firm Pepper Hamilton.

Needless to say, with multiple lawsuits still ongoing in various stages, things are still far from over when it comes to dealing with the aftershocks from the scandal that saw McCaw, former head coach Art Briles and many others lose their jobs. While Matt Rhule and the Bears football program may have done their best to move on, it’s pretty clear that we’re still years away from putting the entire matter in the rearview mirror.

After inheriting only 38 scholarship players, David Beaty hopeful Kansas is up to 70 in 2018

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If you had to pick the toughest program to win at the Power Five level, you would probably find near universal agreement that Kansas would be the place. Outside of that remarkable Orange Bowl run under Mark Mangino, the school has simply struggled to stay above water just about every season.

Such is the case with their current head coach in David Beaty, who is entering a critical year that could determine his job status for 2019 after going 3-33 at the school. As difficult as things have been on the field for him and his staff though, it’s been compounded by the fact that the Jayhawks have had their hands tied behind their backs as the result of a severe shortage of scholarship players.

As The Athletic detailed this week in a look into the program, Beaty incredibly inherited only 38 scholarship players from Charlie Weis. 38! The scholarship math thanks in part to the buyout-in-chief was even worse than what it looked like on the surface:

In the recruiting classes of 2012 and 2013, Weis and his staff brought in a combined 27 junior college transfers. Only two were academic qualifiers coming out of high school. Fourteen did not graduate, and 10 — including touted signees Marquel Combs, Chris Martin and Kevin Short — never saw the field. And then, by the end of 2014, they were all gone. So was Weis. Going into 2015, only 12 of Weis’ first 56 signees were still on the roster.

Even programs with NCAA sanctions are not in that kind of hole.

“We’ve had to be very creative since we’ve got here. I daresay this just may be the most creative staff in the history of the game,” Beaty said. “I’ve gotta laugh, because if I don’t, I’ll cry.”

No kidding.

Beaty hopes to have KU up to 70 scholarship players this season, still 15 short of the 85 that most of the teams he’ll be playing against. It’s been a struggle even to get to that kind of number which makes it even more likely the Jayhawks will struggle on the field once again in 2018.

Arkansas State’s Justice Hansen, Appalachian State’s Clifton Duck named Sun Belt preseason players of the year

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The SEC isn’t the only league in the South to release their preseason all-conference team on Friday as the Sun Belt named Arkansas State QB Justice Hansen and Appalachian State defensive back Clifton Duck as the preseason offensive and defensive players of the year for 2018.

Hansen is looking to repeat as Sun Belt Conference Offensive Player of the Year after winning the award at the end of last season after throwing for nearly 4,000 yards and accounting for 44 touchdowns with the Red Wolves. Duck had six interceptions last year to help pace the Mountaineers’ defense and is tied with fellow first-team selection Blace Brown (who plays at Troy) for the most in the nation the past two seasons with 11.

All told though, the Neal Brown’s Trojans had the most selections across the two All-Sun Belt preseason teams with 11 players earning a nod.

The full 2018 Preseason All-Sun Belt team is below:

First Team Offense

QB – Justice Hansen

RB – Jalin Moore (Appalachian State), Warren Wand (Arkansas State)

WR – Justin McInnis (Arkansas State), Penny Hart (Georgia State), Marcus Green (ULM)

TE – Collin Reed (Appalachian State)

OL – Victor Johnson (Appalachian State), Lanard Bonner (Arkansas State), Kevin Dotson (Louisiana), Tristan Crowder (Troy), Deontae Crumitie (Troy) 

First Team Defense

DL – Ronheen Bingham (Arkansas State), Logan Hunt (Georgia Southern), Hunter Reese (Troy), Trevon Sanders (Troy)

LB – Anthony Flory (Appalachian State), Michael Shaw (Georgia State), Tron Folsom (Troy)

DB – Clifton Duck, Justin Clifton (Arkansas State), Monquavion Brinson (Georgia Southern), Blace Brown

First Team Special Teams

K – Gavin Patterson (South Alabama)

P – Corliss Waitman (South Alabama)

RS – Marcus Green (ULM)

Second Team Offense

QB – Caleb Evans (ULM)

RB – Wesley Fields (Georgia Southern), Trey Ragas (Louisiana)

WR – RJ Turner (ULM), Jamarius Way (South Alabama), Deondre Douglas (Troy)

TE – Ellis Richardson (Georgia Southern)

OL – Jacob Still (Arkansas State), Curtis Rainey (Georgia Southern), Hunter Atkinson (Georgia State), Shamarious Gilmore (Georgia State), Aaron Brewer (Texas State)

Second Team Defense

DL – Myquon Stout (Appalachian State), Marterious Allen (Georgia State), Tyree Turner (South Alabama), Marcus Webb (Troy)

LB – Silas Kelly (Coastal Carolina), Bull Barge (South Alabama), Bryan London II (Texas State)

DB – Tae Hayes (Appalachian State), BJ Edmonds (Arkansas State), Marcus Jones (Troy), Cedarius Rookard (Troy)

Second Team Special Teams

K – Tyler Bass (Georgia Southern)

P – Cody Grace (Arkansas State)

RS – Marcus Jones (Troy)

Hotels, recruiting trips and meals among the things on the chopping block at New Mexico due to budget cuts

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Operating a Division I athletics program can be tough but few face the inherent hurdles of running a department quite like the two FBS schools in the state of New Mexico. For years the Aggies of New Mexico State have had one of the smallest budgets in the country and their rivals at New Mexico are not immune to the same challenges either. Case in point came this week as the Lobos moved to cut four sports on Thursday by a unanimous vote from the UNM Board of Regents.

While football was not on the chopping block for the school (it’s a required sport to remain in the Mountain West), the program itself is not immune to penny-pinching the department is facing in the near term. According to the Albuquerque Journal, this includes no longer staying at a hotel the nights before home games, a reduction in the recruiting budget for trips and a potential reduction in the number of meals the school provides to players.

“We are talking about football internally,” athletic director Eddie Nuñez said. “Football, as well as every other sport, is going to be held to the same accountability when it comes to managing their budgets.”

According to recent records, the football team spent a reported $8.3 million during the most recent fiscal year and failed to turn a profit. The Lobos will soon be reducing the total number of players on the team from 116 to 113 (there will remain 85 scholarships available) for both budgetary and Title IX reasons as well. While it was certainly not intended, the program did see some additional cost savings earlier this year when they suspended head coach Bob Davie without pay for 30 days.

Still, times are tough in the state and nobody knows that better than the athletic departments who are facing a money-crunch and trying to do what they can to dig themselves out of it.