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Defending champ North Dakota State tops FCS preseason Top 25

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College football is not a game with a lot of parity, at least not at the very top. In FBS, Alabama has won five of the last nine national championships and enter 2018 as the favorite. In Division III, Mount Union has won two of the last three and (coughs) 13 of the last 25 national titles, and the Purple Raiders enter 2018 as the favorites.

Such is life in FCS as well.

North Dakota State won five straight national championships from 2011-15, lost a stunner to eventual champion James Madison in the 2016 FCS semifinals, then avenged that loss in January with a 17-13 triumph over the Dukes to make it six crowns in seven tries.

The STATS FCS preseason Top 25 came out Monday, and the Bison are the clear No. 1, earning 151 of the 157 available first-place votes. Reigning runner-up James Madison checked in at No. 2, while South Dakota State was No. 3 and perennial contender Sam Houston State was No. 4. In just its fourth year of existence, Kennesaw State came in at No. 5.

The 2018 season begins with No. 14 North Carolina A&T against No. 6 Jacksonville State at Montgomery, Ala.’s Cramton Bowl on Aug. 25 (7 p.m. ET, ESPN).

The full poll:

1. North Dakota State — 3,919 total points (151 first-place votes)
2. James Madison — 3,764 (6)
3. South Dakota State — 3,470
4. Sam Houston State — 3,228
5. Kennesaw State — 3,120
6. Jacksonville State — 3,041
7. New Hampshire — 2,873
8. Weber State — 2,815
9. Eastern Washington — 2,541
10. Wofford — 2,087
11. Samford — 2,003
12. Elon — 1,812
13. Northern Iowa — 1,612
14. North Carolina A&T — 1,480
15. Delaware — 1,470
16. Central Arkansas — 1,383
17. McNeese — 1,133
18. Nicholls — 1,056
19. Villanova — 920
20. Stony Brook — 798
21. Illinois State — 795
22. Austin Peay — 709
23. Furman — 685
24. Montana — 626
25. Youngstown State — 541

North Dakota State has been ranked in the Top 10 for 99 consecutive weeks, which is 21 weeks longer than their next-closest competitor (South Dakota State) has been ranked in the Top 25.

Texas approves two-year contract extension for Tom Herman

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With Texas being back (?), the football program’s sideline boss is being rewarded for getting the Longhorns there.

Amidst speculation that surfaced earlier this month, the university confirmed Thursday that a two-year contract extension for Tom Herman has been approved.  The head coach is now signed through the 2023 season, the same season, incidentally, a home-and-home with Alabama will finish up.

According to the Associated Press, the two-year extension is worth a total of $13.25 million.  This past year, Herman’s $5.5 million in compensation was ninth nationally and tops among all Big 12 coaches.

“I’m so grateful for President [Greg] Fenves, [athletic director] Chris Del Conte and the UT Board of Regents, and for all the support they provide me, my family and our football program,” Herman said in a statement. “I truly love being the head football coach at Texas. I’m enjoying every minute of it, am so fortunate to have a tremendous staff, and the players in our program are just awesome to work with.

“We’ve done some good things, but have so much more we are preparing to accomplish. I’m excited for the future.”

After a 7-6 first season in Austin, Herman guided UT to a 10-4 record in 2018, which included a Sugar Bowl win over fifth-ranked Georgia.  The 10 wins marked the first time the Longhorns hit double-digits since going 13-1 in 2009 under Mack Brown.

K-State’s leading receiver last two years to transfer

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The latest addition to the portal is a rather significant one.

In somewhat of a surprising development, a Kansas State official confirmed to CFT that Isaiah Zuber is now listed in the NCAA transfer database.  The official made sure to note that Zuber could return to K-State by pulling his name from the database; conversely, CFT will make sure to note that K-State has the option to pull the wide receiver’s scholarship at the end of the semester in which he entered the portal.

As a graduate transfer, Zuber will be allowed to use his final season of eligibility immediately at his next stop.  As a highly-productive player, Zuber should be a highly sought after player in college football’s version of the free agent market.

Zuber led the Wildcats in receptions each of the past two seasons — 52 in 2018, 51 in 2017.  During his time in Little Manhattan, Zuber totaled 1,321 yards and 11 touchdowns on 127 receptions.

P.J. Fleck doesn’t practice what he preaches when it comes to commitment

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P.J. Fleck thinks there’s a problem in this country, and he doesn’t have a clue how correct he is.

As you may or may not have noticed, the NCAA transfer database is wide open and has been doing a significant amount of business.  There’s not a day goes by where there aren’t multiple posts on CFT about Player X entering — or reentering, as the case may be — his name into the portal. And then there are high school prospects committing to one school while (gasp!) still taking visits to others.

The personnel movement both before and after entering the collegiate ranks has caused significant angst within the coaching profession, not the least of whom is the current Minnesota head coach.  From the Minneapolis Star Tribune:

I have a rule: You commit to me, you can’t go see another place,” Fleck said. “Not because I’m insecure. But if you want to be committed, you’re going to be committed. Too many people teach young people to be committed but also one foot in and one foot out. … You’ve got to be all in.”

Or as Fleck termed it: “We have a problem in our society. We don’t have a problem in our program.

The problem with that?

In December of 2014, Fleck signed a six-year contract extension as the head football coach at Western Michigan.  Less than two years later, speculation was running rampant that he was the frontrunner for the Minnesota job; in January of 2017, Fleck was named the head coach of the Golden Gophers.

It’s easy to talk about loyalty and commitment when it’s somebody else’s, right coach?  Coaches are free to move above the country at their leisure, while the vast majority of the very same profession will do anything and everything to restrict a player’s movement to a situation the student-athlete feels is better for his future.

Fleck is right about there being a problem in the sport, but it sure as hell isn’t limited to player movement.

(Tip O’ the Cap: @CFAAEliteClips)

Outback Steakhouse to continue sponsorship of Tampa bowl game

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For those fans of Team Bloomin’ Onions or Team Coconut Shrimp, you’re in luck when it comes to your annual foodie freebies.

In a press release, “Outback Bowl officials announced… that long-time Title Sponsor Outback Steakhouse has agreed to extend its contract with the New Year’s Day Bowl for six additional years through the January 2026 game.” The Tampa-based game, sponsored by a Tampa-based company, has been played annually since 1986; this new agreement ensures that Outback Steakhouse will continue as the longest-running title sponsor in college bowl game history.

Perhaps most importantly, Outback officials also announced that, over the next seven postseason games, the Outback Bowl will contribute $45 million to universities and donate at least $3.5 million to charities through its Charitable Giving Initiative

“We are proud to announce the continuation of our long-term relationship with Outback Steakhouse,” said Outback Bowl president/CEO Jim McVay in a statement. “With Outback Steakhouse’s continued commitment, the Outback Bowl will be able to grow the more than $1 billion economic impact it has generated to date, allow us to continue to positively showcase the Tampa Bay region both nationally and internationally, add to the almost $150 million generated for universities and expand our Charitable Giving Initiative program which has already benefited over ninety non-profits.”

The first iteration of what would ultimately become the Outback Bowl — at the time it was called the Hall of Fame Bowl — was played on Dec. 23, 1986, a 27-24 win for Boston College over 17th-ranked Georgia.  The steakhouse became the title sponsor in 1995, with Penn State beating Auburn 43-14 in the first game known as the Outback Bowl.

This past season, Iowa upset No. 18 Mississippi State 27-22 in the most recent iteration of the Outback Bowl that’s now played annually between members of the Big Ten and SEC.