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Baylor reportedly being encouraged to self-impose bowl ban

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In June of this year, it was reported that Baylor wasn’t expecting any type of earth-shattering NCAA penalties in connection to the sexual assault scandal that rocked the university in general and the football program specifically two years ago.  Two months later, it appears circumstances may have changed.

Citing multiple unnamed sources, the Fort Worth Star-Telegram‘s Mac Engel is reporting that BU has been advised to self-impose sanctions on its football program, including a one-year bowl ban for the Bears for the 2018 season.  The recommendation of a postseason ban reportedly comes from the law firm that is representing the university as the football program wades its way through the NCAA’s investigation.

Per the Star-Telegram, that investigation took a “left turn” at some point in the not-too-distant past that wasn’t favorable towards Bears football.  That left turn, coincidentally or not, came not long after several current and former BU officials, including ex-athletic director Ian McCaw, spoke to NCAA investigators.

In a late-June deposition in connection to a lawsuit filed by nearly a dozen women against Baylor, McCaw, now the athletic director at Liberty University, claimed that university officials had engaged in “an elaborate plan that essentially scapegoated black football players and the football program for being responsible for what was a decades-long, university-wide sexual assault scandal.” The university subsequently fired back at McCaw’s portrayal.

According to Engel’s report, the NCAA’s investigation should be completed within the next 60 days.  That conclusion would serve as the bookend for what’s been a disturbing, years-long series of revelations.

In late January of 2017, damning details in one of the handful of the lawsuits facing the university emerged, with that suit alleging that 31 Bears football players had committed 52 acts of rape over a period of four years beginning in 2011.

Not long after, a legal filing connected to the libel lawsuit filed by a former BU football staffer produced emails and text messages that paint a picture of former head coach Art Briles and/or his assistants as unrestrained rogue elements concerned with nothing more than the image of the football program off the field and its performance on it. The details in a damning document dump included allegations that Briles attempted to circumvent BU’s “judicial affairs folks” when it came to one player’s arrest… and on Briles asking, in response to one of his players brandishing a gun on a female, “she reporting [it] to authorities?”… and asking “she a stripper?” when told one of his players expected a little something extra from a female masseuse… and stating in a text “we need to know who [the] supervisor is and get him to alert us first” in response to a player who was arrested on a drug charge because the apartment superintendent called the police.

In reference to a woman who alleged she was gang-raped by several Bears football players, Briles allegedly responded, “those are some bad dudes. Why was she around those guys?

In response to the report of a potential bowl ban, Baylor issued the following statement:

It is irresponsible to report that Baylor is considering a football bowl ban for the 2018 season when in fact the NCAA investigation into the prior football staff and previous athletics administration remains active and ongoing. Additionally, it is premature to speculate as to what the University’s sanctions will be at this point in time.

USF the landing spot for Michigan transfer Eddie McDoom

COLLEGE FOOTBALL: NOV 04 Minnesota at Michigan
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Nearly two weeks after leaving the Midwest, Eddie McDoom is heading south.

Over the weekend, it was reported that McDoom intends to transfer into Charlie Strong‘s South Florida football program. USF, which opens the 2018 season Sept. 1 against FCS Elon, subsequently confirmed McDoom’s addition to the roster, including his official addition to the online roster.

McDoom will be forced to sit out the 2018 season to satisfy NCAA bylaws. The wide receiver will then have two years of eligibility remaining beginning with the 2019 season.

Earlier this month, it was reported that McDoom was no longer a part of the Michigan football program.

McDoom, a three-star 2016 signee, finished the Wolverines portion of his playing career with 16 receptions for 140 yards. The Florida native also ran the ball 24 times for another 203 yards.

Lingering effects of devastating 2016 knee injury forces Michigan’s Grant Newsome to retire

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As the player himself stated, not all stories have a happy ending.

Michigan offensive lineman Grant Newsome sustained a serious knee injury in early October of 2016 and spent 38 days in the hospital, including more than a week in intensive care, as doctors fought to save his leg. Newsome missed the entire 2017 season as he recovered from the devastating injury, and then was sidelined for spring practice this year as he still awaited medical clearance to resume playing football.

Optimistic of a return in early May, Newsome instead announced Monday that he will be forced to retire from the sport. Newsome’s injuries included a dislocated knee, fractured tibia, three torn knee ligaments as well as significant and extensive nerve damage in the area, and the latter issue is what in very large part foiled Newsome’s comeback attempts.

“Despite the near-miraculous healing in the knee, the totality of the injury was too much,” Newsome wrote in his Twitter missive, “as some recent secondary injuries coupled with the fragile nature of a vascular graph have made the risk of playing football again one that is too great for me to accept. …

“One day I will be able to play catch with my kids, to chase after them as they learn to ride a bicycle, to stand on my own two feet and applaud them at their graduation.”

Newsome plans to remain with the Wolverines as a student coach, working with U-M’s tight ends. He will also enroll in graduate school and work toward earning his Master’s degree.

Prior to the injury, Newsome, a four-star 2015 signee, started the first five games of the 2016 season at left tackle after starting one game as a freshman in 2015.

Former four-star Florida State lineman moves on from football

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With the start of the 2018 season less than two weeks away, Florida State will have one fewer option in the trenches than expected.

Corey Martinez took to his personal Twitter account Monday to announce that he has decided “to move on from football and do what’s best for myself and my family.” The lineman also provided some details as to what his post-football future will hold.

“As I continue my life journey,” the fifth-year senior wrote, “I look forward to stepping foot into the construction industry so that I can work my way into becoming a project manager and apply for my General Contractors license in the near future.”

On 247Sports.com‘s composite board, Martinez was rated as four-star 2014 signee. That same board had the Tampa product as the No. 14 offensive guard in the country and the No. 33 player at any position in the state of Florida.

Martinez played in 11 games the past three seasons after redshirting as a true freshman. He started three games during his time with the Seminoles, with all three of those starts coming during the 2016 season.

Florida State AD Stan Wilcox takes over Oliver’s Luck’s old NCAA job

NCAA FOOTBALL: NOV 11 Boston College at Florida State
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As had been rumored, Florida State is in search of a new athletics boss.

The NCAA announced Monday that Stan Wilcox has accepted the position of executive vice president of regulatory affairs. Wilcox has been the athletic director at Florida State since August of 2013, and FSU will now be forced to launch a national search for a replacement.

Wilcox will replace Oliver Luck, the former West Virginia athletic director who left the NCAA in June of this year to take on the job of XFL commissioner.

“Stan is a highly-respected, visionary leader in intercollegiate athletics, and I’m excited to have him join our senior leadership team at the national office,” NCAA president Mark Emmert said in a statement. “Stan’s nearly three decades of experience working in athletics administration at Notre Dame, Duke and Florida State, among others, have clearly demonstrated his commitment to providing student-athletes with the opportunity to excel in both academics and athletics while being successful in life.”

“I want to thank Stan for everything he has done at FSU. We’re excited for him, and we all wish him the best in his new position,” said FSU president John Thrasher in his statement. “Our success on the playing fields under his leadership has been exceptional, with national championships in football, soccer, and softball over that time. We finished ninth in the 2017-18 Learfield Director’s Cup last year, and our student-athletes reached a cumulative 3.0 GPA this past year.”

Below is Wilcox’s full statement on his departure from Tallahassee:

I am honored and humbled to join Mark Emmert’s leadership team at the NCAA.

I am so grateful for the opportunities and experiences that have led me to this point. The Big East Conference, Notre Dame University, Duke University and most recently Florida State University have provided a depth and breadth of experiences on which I will rely heavily moving forward.

I am excited to return to the NCAA, where my intercollegiate athletics career began.

Lastly, I would like to express my gratitude to former Florida State University Presidents Eric Barron and Garnett Stokes, and current President John Thrasher. The success we have enjoyed in Tallahassee would not have been possible without their trust, guidance and support, and without the fine efforts of our student-athletes, coaches and athletics support staff.

My wife Ramona and I are excited to start this new chapter in my career and in our lives together.