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No. 19 Texas leading Texas Tech in Lubbock

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Despite staring a 14-0 deficit in the face, No. 19 Texas recovered to take a 17-10 lead to the locker room over Texas Tech in Lubbock.

Texas Tech accepted the ball to open the game and rolled 66 yards in 10 plays, scoring on a 5-yard pass from Jett Duffey to T.J. Vasher.

After a Texas punt, Texas Tech threatened to push its lead to 14-0 when Duffey found Mason Reed for an 8-yard gain on third down, setting up a 1st-and-goal at the Texas 1-yard line. But Texas stuffed Red Raiders running back Da’Leon Ward on first down and Duffey had to corral a bad snap on second down. Rather than eat the ball or throw it into the stands, Duffey attempted to allude Texas safety Caden Sterns and fire a pass, which was intercepted by Davante Davis.

Given new life, Texas mounted its first drive, aided by two third down completions from Sam Ehlinger to Lil'Jordan Humphrey, first for 15 yards, then for 40. The second gained pushed the ball to the Red Raider 24, but consecutive sacks forced a career-long 52-yard Cameron Dicker field goal.

After forcing a Texas Tech punt, Texas again mounted a methodical, 18-play, 8-minute drive down the field until two more consecutive sacks backed the ‘Horns up from the Texas Tech 11 to the 34. However, during a 7-yard completion to Humphrey on 3rd-and-33, Texas Tech was flagged for a face mask on the complete opposite side of the field. Rather than kick a 44-yard field goal, Texas was given a 1st-and-10 at the Texas Tech 13. The Longhorns converted this time, as Ehlinger again found Humphrey on another third down, securing a 9-yard touchdown to put Texas up 10-7 with 3:46 left in the first half. With Collin Johnson out due to a knee injury suffered during practice this week, Humphrey has carried the Texas offense, catching six passes for 109 yards and the score. He accounted for 109 of Ehlinger’s 132 passing yards.

Facing his first deficit, Kliff Kingsbury decided to roll the dice deep inside his own territory. After Ward was corralled for a 1-yard gain on 3rd-and-2, Kingsbury put Duffey under center at his own 34 and called for a sneak — which was stuffed.

Texas took advantage of the short field, needing three plays to set up a 1-yard Keaontay Ingram touchdown run with 1:16 left in the first half.

Texas Tech halted UT’s 17 straight points when Clayton Hatfield snuck in a 41-yard field goal with seven seconds left before halftime.

Texas will receive to open the second half.

Texas kicker/punter Chris Naggar reportedly transfers to SMU

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SMU is once again on the positive side of the football transfer portal.

Earlier this offseason, Chris Naggar entered the NCAA transfer database.  This weekend, 247Sports.com indicated that the kicking specialist has transferred into the SMU football program.

As of yet, neither the player nor the school has confirmed the development.

Naggar would be heading to the Mustangs as a graduate transfer.  The upcoming season would serve as his final year of eligibility.

Naggar joined the Texas Longhorns as part of its Class of 2016.  His first three years in Austin, the Arlington, Tex., native didn’t see the field.

This past season, Naggar appeared in seven games for the Longhorns.  He punted the ball 25 times in 2019, averaging 39.3 yards per punt.  He also kicked off three times in his seven appearances.

This offseason, SMU has added a pair of Power Five transfers to its football roster.  Stanford offensive lineman Mike Williams joined the AAC team in February.  Arkansas wide receiver TQ Jackson did the same three months later.  Additionally, starting linebacker Richard Moore was granted a sixth season of eligibility.

The Mustangs are coming off a 10-3 campaign, the program’s most wins since the pre-death penalty season of 1984.  In December, SMU announced it had reached an agreement on a contract extension with head football coach Sonny Dykes.

Tom Allen addresses ‘devastating’ shooting death of former Indiana defensive lineman Chris Beaty

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A tragedy that struck the Indiana football program has drawn a response from its head coach.

It was reported Monday that Chris Beaty “was one of two men shot and killed in separate incidents over the weekend as violence erupted in Downtown Indianapolis.” The 38-year-old Beaty was shot multiple times shortly before midnight local time Saturday and was pronounced dead at the scene.

Beaty was a defensive lineman for the Indiana Hoosiers football team from 2000-04.

Monday afternoon, Tom Allen addressed the tragic development.

“I am at a loss for words. The news of the passing of Chris Beaty is just devastating. Since I returned home to coach at Indiana, Chris embraced me, encouraged me and supported me! His passion for life and Indiana Football energized me every time we were together. He was one of our first alumni that displayed his unwavering support for what we are building here at Indiana and how we are building it. I am so heartbroken for his family and he will be deeply missed by all those that were blessed to call him a friend! LEO”

Despite being away from the Indiana football program for nearly two decades, Beaty remained close to it.

HoosierHuddle.com wrote that “Beaty was still actively involved with IU football. He tweeted on April 26th a screenshot of head coach Tom AllenMark Deal and several other Indiana football alumni. He thanked Allen for checking in with the former players and said that IU football was in good hands.”

Included was a tweet from Beaty’s personal Twitter account.

College Football Hall of Famer Pat Dye dies at 80

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In Pat Dye, Auburn has lost one of its most storied head coaches.

Last month, Dye was hospitalized for kidney-related issues.  During that hospital stay, Dye tested positive for COVID-19.  At the time, his son, NFL agent Pat Dye Jr., stated that “[w]e fully anticipate his release from the hospital in the next few days once his kidney function is stable.

Sadly, 247Sports.com is now reporting that Dye died on Monday at 80.  A cause of death has not been released.

The website wrote that “Dye, who was moved to Bethany House in Auburn following a stay at East Alabama Medical Center in Opelika, listened to phone calls on Monday morning from family, friends and former players on Monday morning.”

A Georgia native, Dye played his college football at the University of Georgia.  He began his coaching career as linebackers coach at Alabama from 1965-73.  From there he became the head coach at East Carolina from 1974-79, then at Wyoming for one season in 1980.

Most famously, though, Pat Dye spent a dozen seasons as the head coach at Auburn.  From 1981-92, Dye went 99-39-4 with the Tigers.  Included in that was a 6-6 record in the Iron Bowl.  And a national championship in 1983.

Under a cloud of NCAA controversy, it was announced on the eve of the 1992 Alabama game that Dye would be resigning at season’s end.  There was also the Condoleeza Rice playoff committee flap.

All told, though, Dye went 153-62-5 as a head coach.  In 2005, he was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame.

Syracuse great Floyd Little diagnosed with cancer

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One of the famed 44s of the Syracuse football program is in the midst of the “toughest fight of his life.”

On a GoFundMe page created by one of his former teammates, Pat Killorin, it’s was revealed that Floyd Little has been diagnosed with cancer. It wasn’t divulged what specific cancer Little is battling, but Killorin described it as “a treatable but aggressive form of” the disease.

“No doubt it will be the toughest fight of his life,” Killorin wrote. “Although he has lived a full life admired and enjoyed by many, Floyd doesn’t believe he has yet written, with his Lord and Savior Jesus Christ, the final play of his life.”

Thus far, the fundraising effort has brought in over $15,000 toward the stated goal of $250,000.

Little was a three-time All-American for the Syracuse football team in the mid-sixties.  He’s the only three-time All-American at the running back in Orange history.  During his time at the school, Little ran for 2,750 yards and 35 touchdowns.

In 1983, Little was inducted into the College Football Hal of Fame.  The sixth-overall pick of the 1967 NFL Draft, Little landed in the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2010.

In 2005, the Syracuse football program retired number 44 to honor Little, Jim Brown, Ernie Davis and the other players who wore the number.  A decade later, that number was brought out of retirement.

Little returned to his alma mater in 2011 as the special assistant to then-athletic director Daryl Gross.  The Connecticut native left that position in 2016.

“Floyd Little is a fighter,” Syracuse head coach Dino Babers said. “I know he will face this disease with the same courage, dignity and strength with which he met all of life’s challenges. “The entire Syracuse Football family is in his corner.”