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No. 6 Oklahoma wins shootout over No. 13 WVU, setting up a Red River Rematch

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In a typical Big 12 shootout that saw more than 110 points and 1,300 yards of total offense, No. 6 Oklahoma received and made its own breaks in outlasting No. 13 West Virginia, 59-56 in Morgantown.

While the Sooners’ offense was as efficient and explosive as always in putting up 668 yards on 10.3 yards a play, it was the plays made when Kyler Murray and company were on the sideline that tilted the game in Oklahoma’s favor. The beleaguered Oklahoma defense forced two Will Grier fumbles and returned both for touchdowns and benefitted from two West Virginia touchdowns (or almost certain touchdowns) getting wiped off the board due to penalties. It was the type of game where an OU defensive back was blocked into and beyond the opposing bench — and it turned into the crucial play of the game in Oklahoma’s favor.

The win pushes Oklahoma (11-1, 8-1 Big 12) into a rematch with No. 14 Texas, giving the Sooners a chance to avenge their only loss of the season, win their fourth straight Big 12 title and 12th Big 12 crown overall while keeping hope alive of a third College Football Playoff berth in Lincoln Riley‘s four years in the program.

Both teams opened the game with consecutive touchdown drives and West Virginia momentarily added a third until Grier’s 8-yard touchdown pass to Gary Jennings, Jr. was wiped off the board due the first game-changing WVU mistake — an offensive pass interference penalty on David Sills V. Rather than owning a 21-14 lead three minutes into the second quarter, West Virginia faced a 3rd-and-19. The Mountaineers picked up 13 yards on a Kennedy McKoy run, but, knowing only touchdowns would beat Oklahoma, WVU dialed up a 4th-and-6 pass, but Grier overshot his intended receiver, giving the OU defense the first stop of the game.

After its defense held serve, Oklahoma’s offense issued its first mistake of the game when Murray fumbled the ball on a 16-yard run to the WVU 22, keeping the score at 14-14.

Given a second chance to take its third lead of the first half, West Virginia again was stopped, posting the game’s first three-and-out and its first punt. Oklahoma needed only two plays to grab its first lead, hitting Marquise Brown for a 65-yard catch-and-run to the WVU 1, which set up a Trey Sermon plunge to put the Sooners up 21-14 with 7:12 left in the first half.

After two straight scoreless drives, West Virginia answered with a 75-yard touchdown drive, capped by the second Grier-to-Sills scoring strike of the night, evening the score at 21-21 with 4:14 left in the first half.

Oklahoma wasted no time in retaking the lead when Kennedy Brooks raced 68 yards for a touchdown, putting the Sooners back in front at 28-21. After the Murray fumble, Oklahoma’s next two possessions both found the end zone in just two plays. After its offense made a big play, the much-maligned defense came up with its biggest of the season when linebacker Caleb Kelly stripped Grier of the ball and returned it 10 yards for a touchdown, pushing the OU edge to 35-21.

West Virginia rebounded to go 81 yards in 13 plays, scoring on a 1-yard McKoy plunge with 18 seconds left in the half to pull within 35-28, then, after Kenny Robinson, Jr. intercepted Murray in the end zone to open the second half, Jennings tied it with a 57-yard touchdown pass.

Another red zone mistake took points off the board for Oklahoma when tight end Carson Meier false started on a 4th-and-1 at the WVU 15, forcing a 37-yard Austin Seibert field goal, which was the closest thing to an Oklahoma punt to that point in the game.

Given a chance to take its third lead — and first since the opening frame — West Virginia capitalized. Grier found Jennings for a 52-yard gain on 3rd-and-18, taking the ball from his own 45 to the OU 2, setting up a Grier sneak to put the Mountaineers up 42-38 with 1:52 to play in the third quarter.

Oklahoma surged back in front when, one play after hitting him for a 30-yard gain on a 3rd-and-10, Murray hit Brown for a 45-yard catch-and-run score with 35 seconds left in the frame — but the scoring wasn’t done for the quarter. Facing another third-and-long, Grier again found a streaking Jennings, this time for a 75-yard score to put WVU up 49-45 with nine seconds left in the third quarter.

Again, Oklahoma immediately answered. The Sooners avoided another red zone disaster when Murray hit a wide open Grant Calcaterra for a 1-yard touchdown toss on fourth-and-goal, putting OU back in front and the game over the century mark, 52-49 with 11:19 to play.

West Virginia (8-3, 6-3 Big 12) was seemingly in place to re-take the lead when McKoy busted through the Oklahoma secondary to set up a first-and-goal, but WVU wide receiver TJ Simmons was flagged for a personal foul for blocking OU cornerback Tre Brown out of bounds, taking the ball from the OU 5 back to the WVU 43. A pass interference penalty pushed the ball into Oklahoma territory, but Grier was stripped for the second time of the night, which turned into the second Sooner defensive touchdown of the night when Curtis Bolton picked up the pigskin and raced it 52 yards to the house.

Unlike after his first fumble-six, Grier did not lead WVU to an immediate touchdown. Instead, three straight incomplete passes forced Billy Kenney‘s second punt, giving Oklahoma the ball with a 10-point lead. But the Sooners could not shut the door, instead punting for the first time of the game. This time, WVU went 80 yards in nine plays, pulling back within 59-56 on Martell Pettway‘s 17-yard run with 4:20 left in the game.

Rather than bank on his defense getting a stop, Dana Holgorsen elected to try and onside kick — which Oklahoma recovered. West Virginia’s defense answered the bell by pushing the Sooners into a 4th-and-5 situation, but, with the ball at the opponent’s 45, Riley elected keep his offense on the field, a choice Murray validated with an 8-yard completion to CeeDee Lamb. Murray salted the game away with a 17-yard run to the WVU 14 with under two minutes away, allowing the Sooners to kneel the ball and the quarterback to improve his Heisman resume with another sparkling night — throwing for 364 yards with three touchdowns and one interception on 20-of-27 passing plus 114 yards and a touchdown on nine carries.

In his final home game, Grier posted a career high 539 passing yards with four touchdowns and no interceptions, but his two fumbles proved the difference in the game.

The win is Oklahoma’s 17th straight victory in the month of November and 19th consecutive win in true road games. It was also the fourth consecutive game and fifth in seven outings the Sooners have surrendered at least 40 points. That’s a run that began with a 48-45 loss to Texas on Oct. 6, a loss the Sooners will get a chance to avenge next Saturday at AT&T Stadium.

No. 4 dual-threat JUCO QB in 2019 to transfer from Middle Tennessee State

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Middle Tennessee State was the landing spot for a Power Five football transfer earlier this month.  Now, the Conference USA school is on the wrong end of the portal.

According to 247Sports.com, Randall Johnson has entered his name into the NCAA transfer database.  An MTSU official has subsequently confirmed that the quarterback is indeed listed in the portal.

Now, for what’s seemingly becoming a daily disclaimer when it comes to transfers.

As we’ve stated myriad times in the past, a player can remove his name from the portal and remain at the same school. At this point, though, other programs are permitted to contact a player without receiving permission from his current football program.

NCAA bylaws also permit schools to pull a portal entrant’s scholarship at the end of the semester in which he entered it.

Johnson began his collegiate career at Reedley College in 2018.  As a true freshman, he was named as the Golden Coast Conference Offensive Player of the Year.  That year, the California native threw for 2,832 yards and 28 touchdowns.  He also ran for another 797 yards and 14 scores.

In the 2019 recruiting cycle, Johnson was a three-star prospect.  On the 247Sports.com composite, Johnson was rated as the No. 4 dual-threat junior-college quarterback.

In his only season with the Blue Raiders, Johnson played in one game.  In that lone appearance, Johnson ran for three yards on a pair of carries. He didn’t attempt a pass.

May 18, Kenneth Major committed to MTSU.  The cornerback was a starter at Purdue.  He’ll be eligible to play for the Blue Raiders in 2020.

Middle Tennessee State is coming off a 4-8 2019 football campaign.  That was the program’s worst record since going 2-10 in 2011.  MTSU also saw its school-record streak of bowl appearances end at four in a row.

Tulsa WR Malik Jackson plunges into the transfer portal

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You can officially put Tulsa on the football transfer portal tote board for the first time in a while.  And not in a good way.

According to 247Sports.com, Malik Jackson has made his way into the NCAA transfer database.  That would be the wide receiver’s first step in ultimately leaving the Tulsa football team.

Thus far, there been no word from either the program or the player on Jackson’s status moving forward.

Now, for what’s seemingly becoming a daily disclaimer when it comes to transfers.

As we’ve stated myriad times in the past, a player can remove his name from the portal and remain at the same school. At this point, though, other programs are permitted to contact a player without receiving permission from his current football program.

NCAA bylaws also permit schools to pull a portal entrant’s scholarship at the end of the semester in which he entered it.

Jackson was a two-star member of the Tulsa football Class of 2017.  The Taylor, Texas, native didn’t see the field at all during his time with the Golden Hurricane.

It’s likely Jackson will be leaving the AAC school as a graduate transfer.  That would allow him to play immediately in 2020.  He would also have another season of eligibility to use in 2021 as well.

Earlier this offseason, Tulsa had welcomed a trio of Power Five transfer into the football program.

Two are former Texas A&M football players — linebacker Brian Johnson and running back Deneric Prince — while one is from Oklahoma State — tight end Grayson Boomer.

All three of those transfers will have to sit out the 2020 season to satisfy NCAA bylaws. Johnson and Prince will have two years of eligibility remaining, Boomer three.

Western Kentucky starting TE Kyle Fourtenbary transfers to FCS Northern Iowa

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One erstwhile Western Kentucky football player has found himself a new college football home. Unofficially, of course.

Late last month, Kyle Fourtenbary opted to enter into the NCAA transfer database.  That was his first official step in leaving the Western Kentucky football team.  Three weeks later, the tight end took the next by announcing on Twitter he is headed to Northern Iowa.

The Panthers play at the FCS level.  That will allow Fourtenbary to play immediately in 2020.  He is also a WKU graduate, so that would’ve granted him immediate eligibility as well.

The upcoming season will be Fourtenbary’s final one.  At least, at the collegiate level it will.

“Excited to announce that I will be transferring to the University of Northern Iowa to finish up my last year of college football!” Fourtenbary tweeted. “Looking forward to a great season.”

A two-star 2016 signee, Fourtenbary redshirted as a true freshman.  The following year, he caught eight passes for 96 yards.  Those numbers were good for third among Hilltoppers tight ends.

The 2018 campaign turned out to be a breakout season for Fourtenbary.  That year, the 6-4, 245-pound Alabama native caught 36 passes for 302 yards and two touchdowns.  He started 11 of the 12 games in which he played.

Entering the 2019 season, Fourtenbary was named as part of the Mackey Award preseason watch list.  Last year, though, he totaled just 108 yards and a touchdown on nine receptions in the first season under new head coach Tyson Helton.

Mississippi State’s Jarrian Jones switches Egg Bowl sides, announces transfer to Ole Miss

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Jarrian Jones spent the first portion of the Egg Bowl rivalry on the Mississippi State side.  Now, he’s headed to the other.

Earlier this week, Jarrian Jones became the fifth Mississippi State football player to enter the NCAA transfer database in seven weeks.  This weekend, he became the latest MSU player to find new home as the defensive back has flipped to the Ole Miss side of the Egg Bowl rivalry.

Jones was a four-star member of the Mississippi State football Class of 2019.  The Mississippi native was the No. 18 safety in the country on the 247Sports.com composite.  He was also the No. 13 prospect regardless of position in his home state.  Only three signees in the class that year for MSU were rated higher than Jones.

As a true freshman, Jones started one of the dozen games in which he played.  In those appearances, he was credited with 12 tackles, two passes defensed and one fumble recovery.

After sitting out the 2020 season, the defensive back will have three years of eligibility to use starting in 2021.

The four other Mississippi State football players who have entered the portal in nearly seven weeks?